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  1. #1
    Frieden and Ed - World Explorer Team frieden's Avatar
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    Default Getting in Shape?

    After getting winded running down the street, I realized I had to do something. Yesterday, I stopped at the gym, and picked up a class schedule. I circled the classes that I wanted to take with red pen, and put it in my boss' mailbox, with a note that stated I needed off for 2 classes per week (of any of the ones circled). Seriously, my doctor said that I needed to start taking Yoga classes again, so that's what I'll start with. Has anyone else started physical training? You young whipper-snappers probably don't need as much as us old geezers do!

  2. #2
    Registered User kyhipo's Avatar
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    Default getting in shape

    I will say my last hike felt like old times,because I have stayed in pretty good shape,after a acl tear and other probs I can now easly hike20 mile days if needed or wanted,I prefer 15nsh.I think staying active most certainly helps.ky

  3. #3
    Registered User gregdog's Avatar
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    tru dat. staying active inbetween hikes is the key. Sounds elementary, but it creeps up on you. I switched to a desk job a few years ago and man it doesn't take long to get soft if you don't watch it. My last hike really let me know that I need to work harder on conditioning. The lbs. don't come off like they used to and without regular cardio you get punked out real quick on a climb. Time is the key.....making the time to do it. So far I'm not doing good at setting time aside to exercise, air conditioning and cold beer are just too appealing.

  4. #4
    Registered User Pacific Tortuga's Avatar
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    2 - 3 10 rough trail miles a week with 4,200 ft. of elevation gain and loss with each hike. A 3 day trip every 6 weeks and a conservative weight loss goal of 25 lbs. As we get into fall and winter the same 20 to 30 mile weeks with my pack and gear on. My legs are no longer feeling soar the day after the 10 mile hikes has been very satisfying and my feet are tougher through the rocks. I'm betting on this program to ease me into AT life, going for the long haul.
    Last edited by Pacific Tortuga; 07-19-2006 at 10:34.

  5. #5
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    i've been doing general floor exercises. heel lifts, stomach stuff, weights for my arms, popping down to my mom's when i get a chance for swimming laps in the pool.

    i got an old bike i'm in the process of fixing, i'm just being lazy about that. [:

  6. #6
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    I had taken a class in Tai Chi Chan,Yan style short form to get my PE credits. Since then I had desired to hike the AT, so I went back to my teacher who has be studying martial arts for over 35 years and started to pick up private lessons once a week practicing Chen style I now practice the form everyday to try and raise my flexablity so i am not so sore after practice. to compare the two to a sport the best i can is that Yan style is like touch football short suddle moves, Chen style is like full contact football large explosive moves. Tai Chi Chan is definatly helping me with my agility, balance, endurance, and sanity. plus I am starting to walk park more.


    Oh btw is it better to walk or run/jog to build muscle in the legs. I would think that walking would be better since that is the motion that you will be doing on the AT versus run/jog since that is haveing the muscles work in a diferent way.? idk any insight??
    There’s no point in the destination if you can't enjoy the journey.

  7. #7
    Hug a Trail volunteer StarLyte's Avatar
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    Here is a GREAT work out prior to a hike.

    Hike up a river with light weight waders on.

    Your entire body will feel it afterwards.

    The water should be at least 2 feet deep. Walk 1 mile to begin with, then work your way up each time. Obviously walking against the current will result in a better work out.

    Don't forget your bug spray. And don't attempt this after a rain.

    I walked 3 miles up the Chagrin River here east of Cleveland Ohio. I was walking north towards Lake Erie. We were supposed to hike but it was 95 degrees. The river walk was a more intense workout but at least it was cooler.
    Three miles doesn't sound like a lot, but believe me it is when you're river walking.

    I picked up a water snake in the river and it bit down on my finger and wouldn't let go, I had to yell for help to get it off---that was exciting

    When you get out of the water and take your waders off, you feel like you can jog 10 miles. It's great !!!

  8. #8
    Frieden and Ed - World Explorer Team frieden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skytoproberts
    Oh btw is it better to walk or run/jog to build muscle in the legs. I would think that walking would be better since that is the motion that you will be doing on the AT versus run/jog since that is haveing the muscles work in a diferent way.? idk any insight??
    That depends on your weight. If you are at all overweight, you should walk, or do your running in water (in a pool, at least past your waist). If you are going to run, consider what we used to call "telephone poles" - jog from one telephone pole to the next, then sprint to the next one, then jog to the next one, and so forth. I used to suggest to my clients to strengthen their ankles and knees first.

    Sit in a chair, lift your leg slightly, and draw the alphabet (upper and lower case) in the air with your big toe, with each foot.

    Sit in a chair, point your toes to the ceilling (think like you are pulling it back to your knee), and raise and lower your lower leg, keeping your foot flexed back. Never lock your knee, and never lower to a 90 degree angle. Don't use weights. Do this with each leg, whenever you think about it.

    These two exercises are really easy to do, while sitting at your desk, and it helps with circulation too. Also, when you are waiting for something (the microwave, the shower to heat up, etc.), do calf raises.

  9. #9
    Registered User Phreak's Avatar
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    I make it a point to stay in shape all the time, so there is never a need for getting in shape. I find it a lot easier to maintain a fitness level rather than to try to get 'back into shape' after a layoff from exercise. I ride my bicycle to/from work whenever possible.. typically 150-200 miles per week, play tennis 2-3x per week, and lots of backpacking. I do a lot of trail running with my dogs, which helps as well.

  10. #10
    Registered Loser c.coyle's Avatar
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    There's nothing better than hiking regularly. 8-10 miles once a week with some ups and downs does wonders for maintaining a decent level of fitness. Also, regular walking, ride a bike, run steps if you have access to a building or your local high school stadium.

    Weight training is nice for other things, but it won't help your cardiovascular fitness much.

  11. #11
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Wow some great tips.

    We've been walking around the neighborhood and I use my poles. I'd like to get out on a trail at least once a week. Last week I was out though it was 100% humidity and I almost croaked. Only got 7 miles in. And my knee's been hurting ever since. Ugh.

    Hope to start doing the neighborhood soon with a pack on my back. That should get some stares.







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  12. #12
    Registered User blindeye's Avatar
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    i was 60lbs overweight when i decided to hike the trail. i have hemed and hawed and done all kinds of diets, and i lost a whopping 15 lbs over 6 months ( note the sarcasim) so now i walk ( or hike) 3 or 4 days aweek and on the off days i lift weights not big weight but 20 to 30 lbs. i REALLY try to keep my caloric daily intake to 2500 calories a day. i have lost 25 lbs in 2 months. it works for me . hope this helps

  13. #13

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    If you are in ok shape you can always start the trail without workout before and building yourself up over the next few weeks to a month. But I think that you would have a better time at the beginning if you had been atleast walking a few miles 2 or 3 times a week and a nice long trail of 8 to 10 miles a weekend a few months before your thur. Personally I will probably be doing what I normally do which is walking a few miles 2 twice a week then an 8 to 10 mile hike every weekend or every other weekend. For me this will not start until mid September.

  14. #14
    Llama Punch VictoriaM's Avatar
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    Yup, I've started. I'm a bellydancer, and I've been dancing up a storm lately. There's no better exercise for women than that. Once I get my pack, I'm going to start walking a few miles with it here and there. I'm also looking to join a yoga class soon, but that's for my own enjoyment, not to get in shape.

  15. #15

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    Started treadmill workout carrying 20 lb weightvest to simulate pack walking 8 miles at 3.1 mph. Anyone out there have any experience with weightvest?
    E-Z---"from sea to shining sea''

  16. #16
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StarLyte
    Here is a GREAT work out prior to a hike.

    Hike up a river with light weight waders on.

    Your entire body will feel it afterwards.

    The water should be at least 2 feet deep. Walk 1 mile to begin with, then work your way up each time. Obviously walking against the current will result in a better work out.

    Don't forget your bug spray. And don't attempt this after a rain.

    I walked 3 miles up the Chagrin River here east of Cleveland Ohio. I was walking north towards Lake Erie. We were supposed to hike but it was 95 degrees. The river walk was a more intense workout but at least it was cooler.
    Three miles doesn't sound like a lot, but believe me it is when you're river walking.

    I picked up a water snake in the river and it bit down on my finger and wouldn't let go, I had to yell for help to get it off---that was exciting

    When you get out of the water and take your waders off, you feel like you can jog 10 miles. It's great !!!
    I'll have to try that again, a lot of that growing up. Does it count as a workout if I bring my fishing pole?

  17. #17
    Registered User Nightwalker's Avatar
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    Just hike; as often as you can; multiple hard days in a row.

  18. #18

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    i went for a run yesterday, finished and realized i had done slightly more than 11 miles....didnt hurt today

    figure im off to a good start

  19. #19
    Frieden and Ed - World Explorer Team frieden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrc237
    Started treadmill workout carrying 20 lb weightvest to simulate pack walking 8 miles at 3.1 mph. Anyone out there have any experience with weightvest?
    Personally, I don't like the weight vest. It doesn't distribute the weight the same as a pack, and it puts stess on your body, before the supporting muscles are strong. Build your supporting muscles up, then your major muscle groups, and then think about the weight vest. If you are already Arnold, then go for it!

  20. #20
    Registered User FLHiker's Avatar
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    Here's an odd one - Rollerblading. (I hate running)

    Great for leg strength, good cardio. - But this only suppliments hiking full pack weight. However, for those of us in flat 'ol F-L-A, we need to work legs some other way!

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