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  1. #1
    Registered User strebor's Avatar
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    Post Supplies For Thru Hike

    I have read alot about re-supply when thru-hiking. But, which is better and least expensive. Mail Drops or buying at a local store on the trail?

    Also I keep reading alot of comments from hikers that you do not need a water filter or a way to purify water. Is water that clean and avalible on the trail.

  2. #2
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    Cheaper and stress free buying along the way.
    I personally feel you don't need to filter or treat water on the AT. I've been drinking it for 20 years and never been sick.

  3. #3
    Doting Membrane Skidsteer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strebor
    I have read alot about re-supply when thru-hiking. But, which is better and least expensive. Mail Drops or buying at a local store on the trail?

    Also I keep reading alot of comments from hikers that you do not need a water filter or a way to purify water. Is water that clean and avalible on the trail.
    Articles:

    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/arti...01&postcount=1

    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/arti...97&postcount=1
    Skids

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  4. #4
    Registered User Phreak's Avatar
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    I plan on using maildrops as much as possible on my '07 thru-hike. I don't eat 'processed' foods, so I'm concerned I won't have many options for resupplying along the trail. I'd rather have the logistic/time issues with the PO's as opposed to not being able to find healthy food at a store.

    I have a friend who is a triple crown hiker and he's never used anything for treating water on the AT, PCT or CDT. Personally, it's not worth the risk of catching a stomach bug. I have a sensitive stomach and I can't imagine being laid up for days on the trail with some illness. But others I hike with never treat their water and have been fine. So I guess it's a personal choice.

  5. #5
    Registered User AdamantiumKid's Avatar
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    Even if it's not something that would make me ill and have to leave the trail, I'd feel much better having as few bugs and floaties as possible swimming in my belly. I'm bringing a filter

  6. #6
    Registered User general's Avatar
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    if you're senseable about where you get your water, there is no need for treatment/filtration. your choice of foods will change, so, buying in a grocery or general store will suit you taste more than pre-bought.
    don't like logging? try wiping with a pine cone.

  7. #7

    Default Maildrops

    I used 20 maildrops when I did the trail. Never again. Maybe a drops in Andover, Monson, and Fontana Dam and that's it. All of those could be made from the trail a couple of weeks ahead of time too.

    A bounce box is handy to toss the very few items you can't get from any grocery store (maps, databook sections, etc), but it's way to easy to over do it on the maildrops.

    -JOhn
    ww

  8. #8
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
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    Read over the various guide books and decide which towns would be hard to reach or didn't have adequate re-supply options. Consider those as your "food" mail drops and buy the rest along the way.

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  9. #9
    Frieden and Ed - World Explorer Team frieden's Avatar
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    I don't like processed foods, either. I'm going to use maildrops, but will try to buy fresh veggies and fruits in major towns. I'm eating a fish sandwich, with lettuce right now. I walked out on my porch, picked a few lettuce leaves, and put them on my sandwich. I'm really going to miss that.

    I'm going to carry a water filter, and a couple of tablets for backup.

  10. #10
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    I've tried the AT with mail drops and without them. I have come to prefer going without them except in the rare instances where resupply is difficult. Then I just make a resupply box at any handy town a couple of weeks ahead of time and mail it from there. I keep a list of where to do that and where to mail to with PO zip codes in the sanctum sanctorum. I've pretty much given up on bump boxes as well. They are a lot of trouble and tend to get misplaced. The general problem with mail is that hitting town after the PO is closed or on a holiday means a zero day or two. More than once I've had to resupply in town instead of waiting for the PO to open. It may take a little practice, but composing meals for a few days and packaging them while sitting outside the grocery story is really not much trouble.

  11. #11
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Swank
    I used 20 maildrops when I did the trail. Never again. Maybe a drops in Andover, Monson, and Fontana Dam and that's it. All of those could be made from the trail a couple of weeks ahead of time too.

    -JOhn
    ww
    Maybe Hanover as well for cold weather gear before tackling the Whites. (?)

    Also, I'd think if you can plan mail drops at hostels or backpack stores that accept them. Then you don't have to depend on the PO being open. (?)







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  12. #12
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
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    [quote=Blissful]Maybe Hanover as well for cold weather gear before tackling the Whites. (?)
    =============================
    Actually, unless you hit Hanover just right (day of the week-wise) you might be better off sending that changeout of clothes/gear to Glencliff which is just 3 - 4 days up the trail.

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  13. #13
    James Sodt Time To Fly 97's Avatar
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    On the AT, I went with drops which I liked...but there were some challenges with that. For example, I ended up eating dinners for breakfasts because I needed more energy. So I had to go to grocery stores a few times, stocked up on dinners, and sent them up in my bounce box. I did feel that by going with drops, I had more time to enjoy the resupply towns which is an important part of the experience (as opposed to spending time getting to the grocery stores which could take hours if you needed a ride). I think that one of the joys of long distance hiking is how great all the ammenities of town life are after you get back - you take nothing for granted. I found that I had a lot to do - laundry, gear repair, waterprooof boots, etc. After that, I didn't want to waste a second before I have a shower and a beer and was hanging out with my hiking buddies.

    For my PCT hiking, I made my own food with a dehydrator. It took a LOT of time, but it was awesome to break out an Indian dish, etc. on the trail. If you have the time, nothing beats this.

    This is definitely a personal preference thing. When I start hiking, I want the logistics to be done and spend as little time as possible doing errands in towns.

    TTF

  14. #14
    Registered User Peaks's Avatar
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    Default Water Treatment

    Sure, some people boast that they never treat the water, and don't have problems. And given that some sources are better than others. But, everyone's immune system is different. While I don't treat all of my water, I certainly do treat some of it. The risk of illness isn't worth ruining my big adventure.

  15. #15

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    It's best to learn to find good water: small seeps, water coming out of the ground, from a spring. The bigger the stream, the better chance that it's contaminated. I've also learned to "camel up" at these good sources and do carry some bleach just in case i get desperate and must drink some water from a river or something, but the last thru-hike i did, i never used it.
    I often chug as much as 3 litres if i know water won't be around for a while. once i do that, i'm good for at least 12 miles or so. I hate carrying water.

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