WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #41

    Default

    Good thread.

  2. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-02-2018
    Location
    California
    Age
    32
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxNcathy View Post
    Starting north Mar 19th how NECESSARY is a stove?
    Thanks, Sandalwood
    I leave the 18th, if you need a stove donít be shy to ask around for me.

  3. #43
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-20-2021
    Location
    Tuscaloosa Alabama
    Age
    35
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Good read

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  4. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4,928

    Default

    Duct tape is overrated.

  5. #45

    Default

    I read you list but I'm not impressed. Duct tape? No mention of first aid? Navigtion? Nutrition? Fitness prior to hiking?

    So here's a list. I can't count how many miles it's based on but it's umpteen thousands...all over the world, much of it as professional work as a geologist. Stopped counting miles thirty years ago...

    1. Safety is first. Carry a decent first aid kit. That includes wound dressings, antiseptic, electrolytes, water treatment, bodyglide, sun protection, and proven quality treatment for blisters (look up blistobans; forget duct tape).

    2. Warmth. You can get painfully cold and uncomfortable on every trip, every month of the year. Merino wool head to toe as a base layer for starters. Always have head gear and some kind of gloves. Don't scrimp on your sleeping bag. 800+ cu inch loft down is worth every penny. You can get a 10 deg rated bag that weighs 2.2 lbs. And take a good parka--you'll wear it lots.

    3. Shelter. Don't count of staying in shelters. There are good shelter options at under three pounds.

    4. Nutrition. Prioritize protein, limit carbs, balance fat. No you don't want to have to rely on Little Debbie for "energy". Teach your body to burn fat, and provide construction materials for repair--you won't get them from pop tarts. Think nutrients, not just energy, and you won't get sick because of vitamin deficiencies.

    5. Navigation. It's a good idea to use more than one technology... GPS and paper maps covers the bases, do different things, have different strengths/weaknesses.

    6. Fitness. Become a hiker before you start a long hike. You're going to make mistakes. Get them out of the way as fast as possible and don't mess up your target hike.

    7. Friends. Be gregarious on the trail. You might need some help at some point. Plus you will make lifelong friends.

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