WhiteBlaze Pages 2022
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$5 for printable PDF, AVAILABLE NOW. $9 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1

    Default Not giving up Yet!

    I just returned from a 4 days school provided by Warren Doyle for hiking the AT. We hiked parts of the AT in NC, TN and VA with day packs. I had a very hard time doing the inclined because of my COPD. He told me that because of the problems I was having it would take me at lest 8 months to hike the trail.

    This made me very discouraged and depressed. I had been hiking some trails around here in TX that were just as rough and many cases steeper that the ones we hiked there. I could not understand what was happening. I did not believe that it was because of the altitude. Something else was wrong.

    On the third day I starting running a fever so I knew I was sick. I felt this was the problem. So I felt I could do much better and hope by the time I get to the AT in March I will be alright to hike the trail. I have now taken the things that Doyle said as a challenge. I am more determine now to do the AT.

    While we were in Damascus,VA I had the chance to talk to Jeff at the Mt. Roger Outfitters. He gave me some very good information that was very different than what Doyle said and I feel better.

    When I got home my doctor found I had developed acute bronchitis and maybe a touch of pneumonia. I now feel that is what was the cause of the problems. I am now on medications and hope to be better soon. I will then have to work even harder to get back into shape. I may still not be able to make it but it will not be with out giving it a very hard try.

    The moral here is do not let someone else determine what you can do or not do. Let your own body determine what it can do. Others can see what is on the outside but can not see what is on the inside. Do not give up because someone tells you that you will never make be able to hike the AT. Only you can make that decision.

    Tomman

  2. #2

    Default Walking The Trail

    Tomman, nothing wrong with walking for 8 months. You can always flip up to Katahdin if you see you're not going to make it in time and walk south.

    When you get out on the Trail, things will not go as planned. Just have fun with whatever happens. You'll be living your dreams and that's a very good thing.

    Being determined is probably the most important part of a long walk, the rest will happen naturally.
    Stumpknocker
    Appalachian Trail is 35.9% complete.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-30-2005
    Location
    NW MT
    Posts
    5,468
    Images
    56

    Default

    I have consistantly tried to have a good day every day of my hike rather than let some sort of overall time limit set the daily pace. IMO, eight months of good days is better than six months of hard days.

    Have a good hike!
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  4. #4
    El Sordo
    Join Date
    02-20-2005
    Location
    Hiawassee, GA
    Age
    77
    Posts
    1,612
    Images
    28

    Default

    lots of good advice here. Hike Your Own Hike means exactly that. If you have the time and resources, who cares how long it takes or how many miles you put in each day.

  5. #5

    Default

    You may be right and the current slowness is temporary. If not, if you are slower than you hoped - so what?

    Warren didn't say you wouldn't make it, just that it might take you longer than you originally planned. Big deal. If you're starting in March, you'll have plenty of time to get to Katahdin.

    Several years ago Backpacker had a TV series on the outdoors. Two episodes were on hiking the AT. There was a woman, Maine Rose, who kept trying to increase her daily mileage past 12 mpd. She was short and round and could not do bigger miles. When other hikers passed her, hiking 20 mile days, she would get very discouraged. Yet she still finished.

    Bottom line - hike your own pace, whatever that may be. Don't let yourself get competitive with other hikers. If your COPD kicks in, just take it slow and easy. One step at a time, one day at a time. That's what gets you to Katahdin.

  6. #6
    Registered User LEGS's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-14-2004
    Location
    HAMPSTEAD,NC
    Age
    79
    Posts
    165

    Default hyoh

    All good advice from the postings above. And just remember, IT'S THE SMILES NOT THE MILES !!!! YOU'LL MAKE IT, HAPPY HIKIN AND MERRY CHRISTMAS!

  7. #7

    Default

    Hiyas Tom,

    Sorry to hear you were sick for the NC trip. Let me know when you get better so we can set up the Arkansas shakedown hike. My brother wants to join us and go in January sometime. Gimme a call

    And merry Christmas!
    2005 "No Legs" Springer to Clingman's
    2007 SloFar/DrClaw - GA-NJ

  8. #8
    Registered User Doctari's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-26-2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,253
    Images
    2

    Default

    8 months, 8 years.

    The trail will still be there.

    I started in 1997, so far have made it about 370 miles. I hike one step at a time, one trip at a time. Come March 15th, 2007, I'll have been "on the AT" in sections for 10 years.

    Get out there, go as far as you can, as "fast" as comfortable. You will want to keep up with faster hikers, that is (In my experience) the path to misery. I for one am most comfortable, and do the most miles over the long term, when I hike at my personal, for each day, pace. If I try to hurry, or "Push the miles" I end up doing less miles in the long term.

    My most miserable days where the days I tried to keep up with: my schedule, friends, whatever took me out of that comfortable pace.

    Carry your COPD meds, take them as perscribed. Plan on rest breaks if that is what it takes. Take days off. Hike short days ("Nero days").

    You can do it.


    Doctari.
    Curse you Perry the Platypus!

  9. #9
    ...Or is it Hiker Trash? Almost There's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-01-2005
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Age
    48
    Posts
    2,454
    Images
    17

    Default

    Warren has his opinion, and you have yours...I would hope you know yourself better than he does. Follow your heart and don't worry about what he says, that's what HYOH is all about.
    Walking Dead Bear
    Formerly the Hiker Known as Almost There

  10. #10

    Default

    I took me 7 months and wished I was out for another. 6, 7, 8, 9 months it makes absolutely no difference. Do the Whites and Maine in the summer, the rest in the spring and fall. Warren was making a guess, but you know that. I've done it 3 times and even I do not know how long it will take me the next time, nor do I care.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomman View Post
    I just returned from a 4 days school provided by Warren Doyle for hiking the AT. We hiked parts of the AT in NC, TN and VA with day packs. I had a very hard time doing the inclined because of my COPD. He told me that because of the problems I was having it would take me at lest 8 months to hike the trail.

    That would make you a speed demon, in my book. I've been at it more or less forever, and I'm still not done yet. Thru-hikes are overrated. Do it in two years, or as long as it takes. The point is to be out there, enjoying yourself, being safe -- and hiking your own hike, not Warren's, and not your hiking buddy's. Push yourself, if you're up to it, but don't let it stop being fun. Your mileage may vary, but that's as it should be. It's your hike.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-30-2005
    Location
    NW MT
    Posts
    5,468
    Images
    56

    Default

    Miss Janet said it best recently: "I've never heard a hiker say they wished they had hiked the Trail faster." She went on the elaborate that many, many hikers have told her they wished they had taken more time on their hikes to see the sights, stop in interesting places, spend more time with people along the way...
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  13. #13
    Registered User Frolicking Dinosaurs's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-25-2005
    Location
    Frolicking elsewhere
    Posts
    12,398
    Images
    15

    Default

    Tomman, hike as slowly as you need to, don't worry about the time it takes. The trail isn't going anywhere. We had seriously considered a thru-hike, but were on-the-fence between doing that and attempting to section hike the trail in about four to six segments. We decided to section hike because my elderly parents need more help than I can give if I take the time to do a thru-hike. Just before we were to go do a 300 - 350 mile segment, we were in an auto accident and I was left with permanent damage to one of my legs. We now have no choice but to section hike and do that much, much more slowly than we had planned. The joy is in the journey, not in arriving at the destination. If hiking the entire AT is your dream - get out there and do it. You don't have to do it somebody else's way.

  14. #14

    Default Walking Faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Marta View Post
    Miss Janet said it best recently: "I've never heard a hiker say they wished they had hiked the Trail faster." She went on the elaborate that many, many hikers have told her they wished they had taken more time on their hikes to see the sights, stop in interesting places, spend more time with people along the way...
    Well, I'll have to talk to Miss Janet because I wish I had walked the Trail faster in '06.
    Stumpknocker
    Appalachian Trail is 35.9% complete.

  15. #15
    Registered User Ewker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-07-2005
    Location
    southeast
    Age
    72
    Posts
    2,051
    Images
    21

    Default

    Tomman, go out and enjoy your hike no matter how long it takes. There is no time limit on when you have to finish. Are you going to do a journal on Trail Journals?
    Conquest: It is not the Mountain we conquer but Ourselves

  16. #16
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-27-2005
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Age
    44
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    Tomman, go for it. I hope to see you out there.

  17. #17
    Geezer
    Join Date
    11-22-2003
    Location
    Portsmouth, NH
    Age
    75
    Posts
    2,964

    Default

    It doesn't matter how long Warren or Jeff or your doctor think it will take you.

    You went to each for their thoughts and you got them, but those thoughts are just, well, just what they think.

    No worries. It's all good information. It might take 8 months, Warren says. Great, now if it DOES take eight months, you won't get depressed because it's been six months and you've still 400 miles to go. And you will be aware of the possible need to flip-flop.

    Jeff thinks less. Very encouraging for you. You can now plan a six-month hike, maybe start in March, which will get you to Katahdin in September. (And if it takes longer, you won't worry because you are aware that it might be eight months, and can flip in July and finsih up walking with the SOBOs.)

    The doctor, well, he's the guy I'd pay most attention to, but regardless of what he says, or Warren or Jeff, it will take you as long as it takes you.

    It's all very zen.
    Frosty

  18. #18
    Musta notta gotta lotta sleep last night. Heater's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-11-2005
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    5,228
    Images
    1

    Default

    Start February, 15th. Enjoy. No problemo!

    Also, there aren't many that would even attempt to backpack the AT 71 years old.

    "Kludos" to ya! (whatever THAT means? I dunno...)

  19. #19
    Geezer
    Join Date
    11-22-2003
    Location
    Portsmouth, NH
    Age
    75
    Posts
    2,964

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Austexs View Post
    Start February, 15th. Enjoy. No problemo!

    Also, there aren't many that would even attempt to backpack the AT 71 years old.

    "Kludos" to ya! (whatever THAT means? I dunno...)
    I think Kludos are candy bars, sort of like snickers, but with the peanuts in the nougat part of the bar instead of in the caramel.

    Both Kudos and Kludos to anyone even considering thruhiking at 71 years old!
    Frosty

  20. #20
    Registered User Grampie's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-25-2002
    Location
    Meriden, CT
    Posts
    1,407
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    2

    Thumbs up Not giving up

    Tomman,
    Disregard what experts tell you. Prepair as best as you can, pick a date to start and start hiking. Listen to your body. Stop and rest when it tell you to. Enjoy the days as they happen and HYOH. Before you know it you will fall into a groove, be it five mile or twenty miles a day. If you don't finish this time, finish later. It's your hike enjoy it.
    Grampie-N->2001

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •