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  1. #1

    :banana Campmor Sleeping Bag

    Hi i have two slepping bags a campmor 20 deg. 2lbs 4oz and a 0 deg. sleeping bag. I plan on starting on Feb 3 2007 what one do you guys think i should take with me.

    PS Thank for the help on the candle Lantern

  2. #2
    Thru hike Done, working on a section hike. stickat04's Avatar
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    Default 0 Degree

    Go with the Zero degree. I took a 20 degree and started in March. I froze my buns off a few nights.

  3. #3
    Geezer
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    Best thing would be to head to the mtns (or in your back yard if it's cold enough) and sleep in the 20* when the temps get down to low teens. If you can sleep in 20* bag (by itself or with liner, etc, whatever you will be hiking with), there's your answer. Bring the 20* bag. If in the morning you say you never want to spend another night like that, or if you have to bail because you are too cold to sleep, well, there's an answer, too. Bring the 0* bag.

    If I were leaving Feb 3, I'd be bringing my 15* WM bag and a pair of StormKloth socks to sleep in (cold feet).
    Frosty

  4. #4
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
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    Has a lot to do with how you sleep ...cold/warm and the difference in weight of the 2 bags.

    I started March 29th (2003) and carried a 20 degree down bag. I'm a warm sleeper and we still had several chilly nights. I made up the difference by wearing a couple layers in the bag.

    If you're a cold sleeper and don't mind the extra weight of a zero degree bag that might be the better option for you. But, like another post indicated ...maybe the best thing is for you to do a little test of both bags in chilly condions to determine your tolerance.

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  5. #5

    Default

    Feb 3?

    Easy. Take the zero.

  6. #6
    Registered User hopefulhiker's Avatar
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    Default

    I would experiment with the 20 degree bag and a silk liner and insulated air mattress. plus wear down layers with it... I like to go light weight though...

  7. #7

    Default

    The bag testers may have a point.

    Starting Feb 3, start sleeping outside. Use the zero for a week, then use the 20 degree for a week. Do this for 2 months. At that point you will know what bag is best for you.

    Plus you'll be starting in decent weather.

  8. #8
    Registered User Toolshed's Avatar
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    When it comes to having a few or more absolutely miserable shivering nights and the effect it has on you and your performance the next day versus sleeping warm and well and being ready to go the next day, the Zero bag is the winner.

    You didn't mention the weight of the zero bag nor the fill nor the age - All large considerations and all will affect the real temp rating of the bag.

    Consider from that you have miserable sleepless nights in a cold 20 degree bag and it will feel like you are lugging much more than the differential of a couple of lbs the next day.

    Plus it's only for a month or so and you can then send it home and have a nicer smelling 20d bag for a few months.

    Finally, if this is your place of last resort, do you want tobe on the edge or do you want to have a bit of a safety margin?

    Finally, Finally, If your bags are down, a week of wet weather might make you bag damp and the temperature rating will be much higher than if the bag was completely dry.
    .....Someday, like many others who joined WB in the early years, I may dry up and dissapear....

  9. #9
    Registered User rockrat's Avatar
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    I'm using the 20 degree bag from Campmor on my hike, but I leave Feb. 27. I am switching to a 0 degree bag though for the Smokies.
    Getting lost only makes things more interesting.

  10. #10
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    I have a 15 degree bag (Marmot synthetic). I figure I can put on more layers if need be.







    Hiking Blog
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  11. #11

    Default

    im looking at a campmor down bag. i like the price but notice the down is 550 fill. does anyone have firsthand knowledge on how campmor down bags compare to the namebrands?

  12. #12
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny quest View Post
    im looking at a campmor down bag. i like the price but notice the down is 550 fill. does anyone have firsthand knowledge on how campmor down bags compare to the namebrands?
    Very well. Its not going to be on par with Western Mountaineering or Marmot's 800+ FP bags, but compares very well with The North Face, Sierra Designs, etc. 600 FP bags. If you're on a budget, they're good choices with relatively accurate temp ratings.

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