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  1. #1
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    Default 'Unique' AT Shelters

    There are many shelters along the trail that are different than all the rest. I enjoyed my stay at Dick's Dome Shelter around a day north of SNP. As I approached the shleter it appeared to be collapsing but upon closer inspection just has an unually design. The log book was full of debate on if it was a true geodesic dome or not and the consensus was no. The floor was in the shape of a pentagon with many bulging triangular walls. The entire outside was shingled. One of the smaller shelters on the trail also, I can't see more than four people comfortably fitting... although more in a storm is always possible.
    -Early Bird

  2. #2
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Is the privy still up a side trail right above the water source?

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    Yes, privy is located a short distance uphill from the stream.

  4. #4
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    Peru Peak Shelter/Lean-to, near Bennington, VT is rather unique. You have to work a bit to get there but both the design and the setting are worth the effort.

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  5. #5
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    Hexacuba shelter, just north of Smarts Mtn. in NH.

  6. #6
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firemountain View Post
    Yes, privy is located a short distance uphill from the stream.
    Not a very smart decision to put it there. Water sources should be kept a healthy distance from a privy, and certainly the privy should not be uphill from the source.

    The shelter design is not that smart either--kind of guarantees the fewest number of sleepers for the number of square feet. But the surrounding area is very attractive IMHO.

  7. #7
    1811 miles and counting!
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    If I recall, the guidebook says not to use the water at the stream at Dick's Dome anyway. There is a very nice spring about a mile north of the shelter.

    I stayed there in '05 and camped out. Nice setting. Packed in enough water for the evening, and filled up at the spring in the morning, just before two yuppie day-hikers came by with their dogs and encouraged them to "jump in and cool off". Grrrrrr

  8. #8
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    I liked the two-story Bryant Ridge Shelter north of Roanoke. Nice design in a nice setting, and a nice place for a relaxed lunch on a sunny Fall day.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  9. #9

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    The old fire wardens cabin (Chestnut Knob maybe??) a little south of Bland is one I found interesting but not often mentioned.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

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  10. #10
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    Default Rausch Gap Shelter

    This shelter in St. Anthony's Wilderness east of Duncannon was built by BMECC in 1973. It was designed by Len Reed who was then BMECC Shelters Chairman and incorporates a number of unusual features. At one time it was known among long-distance hikers as the Halfway Hilton.

  11. #11
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    Default 501 and Eckville Shelters

    Both shelters situated near public roads on BMECC's portion of the A.T. have a caretaker in residence. It should be understood that both shelters are intended for long-distance hikers and use by others is discouraged.

    These shelters came about as a result of an unusual opportunity recognized by Len Reed, who then chaired BMECC's A.T. Corridor Management Committee. The shelters and the homes where the BMECC caretakers now reside were residual structures slated for demolition when acquired by NPS in the 1980s.

    Considerable labor and cash were invested to bring these facilities up to current building codes before NPS approval could be secured by BMECC. They allow for a more complete shelter system in an area where many of the shelters near roads were removed over the years due to vandalism.

    For those interested in more information about BMECC, it's history and how these buildings came to be converted into A.T. shelters go here.
    Last edited by emerald; 03-28-2007 at 13:04.

  12. #12
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATRagamuffin View Post
    If I recall, the guidebook says not to use the water at the stream at Dick's Dome anyway. There is a very nice spring about a mile north of the shelter.

    I stayed there in '05 and camped out. Nice setting. Packed in enough water for the evening, and filled up at the spring in the morning, just before two yuppie day-hikers came by with their dogs and encouraged them to "jump in and cool off". Grrrrrr
    Yeah, I know how you feel. I was at Pinefield Gap Shelter in SNP once and a similarly-demographicked couple came in with their young'uns. The youngest young'en needed its diaper changed. After deleting the dirty diaper which was thrown in the firepit, she cleaned the brat's butt in the stream, then freshly diapered her. They seemed indifferent to my POV on the subject.

    Re: Dick's Dome--I've read that advisory in the Wingfoot, but many folks don't carry the Wingfoot or the Companion. I'd hate to think of anyone getting sick because of a poor decision on privy placement.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ATRagamuffin View Post
    If I recall, the guidebook says not to use the water at the stream at Dick's Dome anyway. There is a very nice spring about a mile north of the shelter.

    I stayed there in '05 and camped out. Nice setting. Packed in enough water for the evening, and filled up at the spring in the morning, just before two yuppie day-hikers came by with their dogs and encouraged them to "jump in and cool off". Grrrrrr
    If you follow the water that runs past the shelter upstream a quarter mile or so, no worries. The spring you mentioned a mile away is rather famous. It actually is hidden pond drainage, but you can't see the source approaching from the dome. The pond is listed in all the yuppie dayhiker guidebooks as a great place to let your dogs take a dump, wash your baby's butt, and rinse your skivvies.

  14. #14
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
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    Default Dick'd Dome Design

    Quote Originally Posted by firemountain View Post
    There are many shelters along the trail that are different than all the rest. I enjoyed my stay at Dick's Dome Shelter around a day north of SNP. As I approached the shleter it appeared to be collapsing but upon closer inspection just has an unually design. The log book was full of debate on if it was a true geodesic dome or not and the consensus was no. The floor was in the shape of a pentagon with many bulging triangular walls. The entire outside was shingled. One of the smaller shelters on the trail also, I can't see more than four people comfortably fitting... although more in a storm is always possible.
    -Early Bird
    Hi, folks - I'm new here. I stayed in Dick's Dome MANY years ago with my young son. Dick's Dome is not a "true" geodesic dome; from an engineering standpoint, you have to know what you're doing to build one (or have a really good kit!). Structures like Dick's Dome are a sort of "poor man's dome" - anyone with basic carpentry skills and some attention to detail can build one. The joint-plates are sold as a package with instructions. The "starplates" have been around for over 20 years: I've been playing with them (and design modifications to them) for almost that long. It's a "quick-up" building that's fun to play with. But shingles are NOT best way to cover the walls - it looks bloody awful.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelterbuilder View Post
    Hi, folks - I'm new here.
    to WhiteBlaze.net shelterbuilder. I am always happy to see another poster from Pennsylvania! I note you are from Berks County also.

    If you were to speak loudy, maybe I could hear you from where I sit and we would not need to communicate in this manner.

  16. #16
    Registered User trlhiker's Avatar
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    I have always liked Paul C. Wolfe shelter in VA. It has bunks, a large covered porch and plenty of water closeby.

  17. #17
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
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    The Jim and Molly Denton Shelter is the bee's knees. I like the convenient water on tap, the cooking pavillion, and the porch.

    I like the Rausch Gap Shelter's wonderful spring running into a trough right out front.

    Eagle's Nest is sturdy as anything, and wonderfully deep. I sat out an incredible storm there.
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

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  18. #18
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    Default Thanks, Marta!

    I like Eagle's Nest Shelter too. There's someone who just posted to WhiteBlaze.net for the first time who will be pleased to hear what you just posted.

    Eagle's Nest is another of BMECC's shelters. At least 5 2000 Milers contributed to its construction.

    There's a photo in National Geographic's more recent book of Eagle's Nest Shelter being air lifted to Weiser State Forest. It was actually built off-site at BMECC's Rentschler Arboretum.
    Last edited by emerald; 03-31-2007 at 08:56. Reason: Corrected a factual error.

  19. #19
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
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    Default Rausch Gap andEagle's Nest Shelters

    Quote Originally Posted by Marta View Post
    The Jim and Molly Denton Shelter is the bee's knees. I like the convenient water on tap, the cooking pavillion, and the porch.

    I like the Rausch Gap Shelter's wonderful spring running into a trough right out front.

    Eagle's Nest is sturdy as anything, and wonderfully deep. I sat out an incredible storm there.
    Rausch Gap shelter is one of the coolest, most re****l shelters that I've ever been to (I just wish that the fly-boys from Fort Indiantown Gap could find somewhere else to play with their planes!). The spring is hidden under the huge rock above the shelter, and is piped behind the rock wall to the trough.

    I sat out a storm at Eagle's Nest that actually spawned a tornado that did a lot of damage up in Schuylkill County (north and east of the shelter). The sky turned GREEN, and rain came down in buckets, but we were fine. It's nice to have a sturdy shelter!

    BMECC is glad that you liked the accomodations.

  20. #20
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shades of Gray View Post
    to WhiteBlaze.net shelterbuilder. I am always happy to see another poster from Pennsylvania! I note you are from Berks County also.

    If you were to speak loudy, maybe I could hear you from where I sit and we would not need to communicate in this manner.

    If I could still speak loudly, I think you know that I would. When you e-mailed me the other night, I checked out the site here, and I thought that I should join up!

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