WhiteBlaze Pages 2022
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$5 for printable PDF, AVAILABLE NOW. $9 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 43
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-04-2002
    Location
    various places
    Age
    47
    Posts
    2,380

    Default Planned daily mileage in GA next year?

    What will your average daily mileage be in GA next year? Or atleast, what do you think it will be?

  2. #2
    Registered User ZEKE #2's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-24-2005
    Location
    West Bend, WI
    Age
    64
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I'm anticipating 9-10 miles per day.
    Zeke

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    Why worry about it? In a hurry? Got an appointment?

  4. #4
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Age
    55
    Posts
    14,861
    Images
    248

    Default

    I expect about 12-14 miles per day average. But that is me.
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  5. #5
    •Completed A.T. Section Hike GA to ME 1996 thru 2003 •Donating Member Skyline's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-08-2003
    Location
    Luray, Virginia
    Posts
    4,844
    Images
    3

    Default

    Start at about 8 mpd, finish GA at about 12 mpd.

    YMMV.

  6. #6
    Registered User Phreak's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-21-2005
    Location
    Lake Saint Louis, MO
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,708
    Images
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by _terrapin_ View Post
    Why worry about it? In a hurry? Got an appointment?
    It's possible they have a short time frame to complete their hike.

  7. #7

    Default

    MOST people in the beginning stay at shelters, so the mileage is dependent upon the distance between the shelters they select to stay at.

  8. #8
    Registered User Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-10-2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    52
    Posts
    656
    Images
    1

    Default

    If I make it 8 mpd, I'll be happy.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    It's possible they have a short time frame to complete their hike.
    If that's the case, they need to be in good shape and have donetheir homework (for example, practice hikes) in advance. Why would the OP care what other hikers were planning or expecting?

    MOST people in the beginning stay at shelters
    As I recall, out of the start gate at Springer or Amicalola, there are lots of nice camping opportunities. I must have been abnormal -- I did more camping than "sheltering" in GA.

    I'm just saying... one sure way to make a hike "not fun" is to be constantly comparing your daily mileage with other hikers. It's been said before: hike your own hike.

  10. #10
    Springer to Atkins, VA
    Join Date
    02-10-2007
    Location
    LA
    Age
    71
    Posts
    205

    Default

    I think it will be driven by water availability or how much added water weight you are willing to carry...that is if this drought continues

  11. #11
    Registered User briarpatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2004
    Location
    Cumming, GA
    Age
    64
    Posts
    305
    Images
    10

    Default

    duplicate post.
    Last edited by briarpatch; 10-15-2007 at 18:09.
    A bad day on the trail beats a good day most anywhere else.

  12. #12
    Registered User briarpatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2004
    Location
    Cumming, GA
    Age
    64
    Posts
    305
    Images
    10

    Default

    I generally tell people to expect Georgia to take 7-10 days, with 8 being about average. It takes 3-4 days of hiking to reach Neels Gap, and another 3-4 days to get to Bly Gap. Experienced hikers will be near the lower number, folks who don't have a lot of mountain hiking experience but train for their hike will be about at the average, and people who decide "I'm gonna go hike the AT" will be at the higher end. Most hikers will take a zero or nero at Neels Gap or in Hiawassee, so that has to be figured into daily averages. Hiking the Approach Trail adds a day, too.
    Last edited by briarpatch; 10-15-2007 at 10:31.
    A bad day on the trail beats a good day most anywhere else.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-11-2006
    Location
    Fleming, OH
    Age
    58
    Posts
    374
    Images
    211

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by briarpatch View Post
    I generally tell people to expect Georgia to take 7-10 days, with 8 being about average. It takes 3-4 days of hiking to reach Neels Gap, and another 3-4 days to get to Bly Gap. Experienced hikers will be near the lower number, folks who don't have a lot of mountain hiking experience but train for their hike will be about at the average, and people who decide "I'm gonna go hike the AT" will be at the higher end. Most hikers will take a zero or nero at Neels Gap or in Hiawassee, so that has to be figured into daily averages. Hiking the Approach Trail adds a day, too.
    I think Roo and I took 11 days to finish Georgia, to include the Approach Trail. We had a 3.7 on the day we got to Neels Gap. That was at her pace, with lots of breaks. When I went by myself from Bly Gap to NOC I did between 10-16 per day. We met one guy coming south who was doing 26 mile days. He was very light and moving out!

  14. #14
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-22-2007
    Location
    Springfield, Illinois, United States
    Age
    64
    Posts
    6,384

    Default

    From what I've read, people seem to get into trouble going too fast too soon. I've never read about someone's hike being "ruined" by starting out GA too slow.

    My plan would be for shorter days than my excitement wants. Short days allow for body to slowly adjust. Too many times I have read about folks taking off like a bat out of hell, only to have to hole up in a hotel to nurse over-use injuries.

  15. #15
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Age
    55
    Posts
    14,861
    Images
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinMusic View Post
    From what I've read, people seem to get into trouble going too fast too soon. I've never read about someone's hike being "ruined" by starting out GA too slow.

    My plan would be for shorter days than my excitement wants. Short days allow for body to slowly adjust. Too many times I have read about folks taking off like a bat out of hell, only to have to hole up in a hotel to nurse over-use injuries.
    Exactly. Let your body tell you what mileage you can do. For planning, make a general itinerary for what you think you want to do based on past hikes - then use that itinerary to start your first campfire on day 1.
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock View Post
    Exactly. Let your body tell you what mileage you can do. For planning, make a general itinerary for what you think you want to do based on past hikes - then use that itinerary to start your first campfire on day 1.
    Yeah, itineraries are pretty worthless. I'd never hiked with a 50 lb pack before, so I kinda sorta planned on stopping at Hawk Mtn the first night. Got there at lunch time so I kept going and ended up at Gooch Gap. So my itinerary was fuel for the fire in 4 hours.

  17. #17

    Default

    ive made about 18 miles a day with considerable weight (30 lbs or more). all depends on your ability and fitness.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-04-2007
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Age
    42
    Posts
    38

    Default Don't underestimate your bumbling abilities.

    Due to various circumstances(Involving me forgeting things), we had to boil all of our water on a camfire for three days. With having to make a fire every morning and night and boil water over it repeatedly. Still, we made 10+ miles each day with our truncated hiking times without too much difficulty. Still, even if you don't share my genius. Plan for delays.

  19. #19

    Default

    Endurance atheletes take and record their pulse every morning while still lying in bed after they awaken. If their resting pulse is 8-10 beats higher than the preceding days, they will cut back on that day's training, or take a day off. This might be of use, especially to old guys like me.

  20. #20
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-22-2007
    Location
    Springfield, Illinois, United States
    Age
    64
    Posts
    6,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by take-a-knee View Post
    Endurance atheletes take and record their pulse every morning while still lying in bed after they awaken. If their resting pulse is 8-10 beats higher than the preceding days, they will cut back on that day's training, or take a day off. This might be of use, especially to old guys like me.
    Excellent point! I will keep this gem in mind, being a baby-boomer myself.

    I plan on taking a zero or two very early in the thru anyway.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •