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Thread: trail runners

  1. #1
    Registered User Peanut's Avatar
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    Hi ladies!! I am planning on wearing my boots starting in Georgia, but am thinking about switching to trail runners after it gets warmer. I've tried searching the forums for trail runner ideas, but am seeing mostly shoes for men. I will check these out, but I was wondering if any of you would mind sharing what works for you. Thanks!!

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    Hi Peanut,

    I wear New Balance 810 trail runners in all kinds of weather including snow/buy one size large and wear liners with med wt hiking socks.

    NB 811 just came out this month if you can't find 810s at a discount.

    I bought 810 for $59 at NewBalanceTampa.com

    Great reaction,ventilation,mult widths and lightweight. needs no break in.

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    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    I switched to trail runners when my boots began giving my calf problems. Made the switch halfway through to Adrenaline ASR (I alo oronate and so this kept my foot stable). They worked beautifully for me. I also wotre spenco hiker insoles them as well. Evn with the orcks of PA and other areas I had good stabiltiy. There was one section in the HWItes in the Presidentials on the scree rocky areas) where boots are better, but that was it, and certainly not worth the switch back.

    In 2011 I will start in Trail runners for sure and skip the boots. No blisters, nothing. Yeah probably get wet feet, but it's no big deal. (I got wet feet in Gortex boots anyway)







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    Registered User Peanut's Avatar
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    Did you buy them ahead of time, or get them on the trail? I've heard your foot lengthens after hiking that long? Is that true, and is it enough to make you need another size boot/runner?

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    Trail runners last about 800 miles for some hikers so good to have back ups.

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    For me, I started my first thru in boots, which gave me huge blister probs. I switched to trailrunners at Fontana, and went the rest of the way in them (bought one more pair further up north).

    My second thru, i started in trailrunners, and then switched to Chacos and went pretty much the rest of the way in those! i used hiking socks with them so my feet didnt dry out and so they would be warmer on some colder days. I really dont like hiking in anything else to this day, although i will sometimes use trailrunners.

    as far as feet lengthening....i did have to buy about a half size bigger in the trailrunners during my first thru. from what i remember, it seemed like this happened to most people.

    enjoy it out there!!!

  7. #7

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    I have a narrow foot, and wear adidas Trail Response, and I wear one size larger than a normal shoe size. I do that for running as well, and wear a pair of very thin liners and another pair of socks. I am generally blister free. I keep my pack weight low to compensate for the decreased support (but better feeling feet).

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    Wife likes Salomon XA Pro Comps
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    REI, if you are near one of those, some smaller local stores will have trail runners for women. There are quite a few brands (Salomon, Asics, NB, Brooks, etc etc.).

    I just got Asic Gels. I think I like them though I can't say I am exactly used to them yet.

    --des

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    Lower cut shoes are far superior to boots in my experience for intensive hiking. (I will likely never be able to thru hike, but I have done week-long sections, including GA.) I think the problem with boots is that too much sweat builds up inside which contributes to blisters.

    I don't normally wear what would be considered true trail 'runners', but rather light weight trail shoes, which I think have a little more support. There are any number of brands out there. I am currently wearing Keen, but have also used Vasque successfully and have already bought a pair of Salomon to replace the Keen's when they wear out.

    Of course, you will likely need to keep your pack weight low, but more than likely you will want to do that anyway.
    Last edited by River Runner; 02-11-2008 at 01:26.

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    1. In a normal-season AT hike temperature is not enough of a concern to warrant wearing boots over trail runners. If you're worried about cold/wet feet bring along a pair of warm wool socks. If you're really worried you could buy gore-tex socks (that you'll never use, but they might help you with cold feet anxiety), or neoprene socks. You could also carry grocery bags to put your feet and socks in while you hike.

    2. As far as socks go, the two-sock (liner/wool) is a throwback to old-fashioned wool socks and probably isn't necessary with smartwools. It's still a good idea if you're having blister problems from friction, but blisters are burns, so removing the thick wool sock is a better solution than adding a liner.

    3. As a woman, you're very lucky! There are many types of shoes that are very popular men's trail runners, and often it's easy to find the less-purchased women's equivalent that was overstocked by the retailer on super-sale.

    4. The amount of mileage you'll get out of a trail runner is largely a function of the miles/day you hike. If you are a 10-15 mile/day hiker you might be able to get away with replacing your trail runners after 800-1000 miles, once they're in tatters. If you're a higher mileage hiker then the fact that the support system of a pair of shoes wears out after 400-600 miles will force you to replace your shoes more frequently. Trying to save money by stretching a pair of shoes extra miles is generally a really bad idea. YMMV.

    5. Supposedly, the tendon that holds the arch in your foot will stretch, and your feet will change shape. This may or may not be true, depending on how much running/hiking you've done before your thru. Heat and walking all day can make your feet swell up and become a bit bigger, and adding the weight of a pack will put more pressure on your feet and temporarily make them a bit bigger.

    6. The AT is a wonderful learning experience. If you pre-buy shoes, gear, etc. then you won't have the chance to apply a lot of what you've learned. As far as trail runners go, simply doing a half-day out of town after you get your new pair of shoes should be enough miles to break them in.

  12. #12

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    i've had great luck backpacking with montrail hardrocks. they come in both regular and wide widths.

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    Montrail got bought out by Columbia recently and has had a SEVERE drop in quality (there are 2-3 threads floating around WB about this problem. ). Unless you have access to old-style hard rocks, I'd stay away from montrail.

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    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peanut View Post
    Did you buy them ahead of time, or get them on the trail? I've heard your foot lengthens after hiking that long? Is that true, and is it enough to make you need another size boot/runner?
    I bought them after I developed calf pain that took me off the trail near Daleville. I went to a local professional running shop in Charlottesville and they fit me with the trail runners. The insoles I had been using all along and they fit in my shoes well. I also normally wear a size 9 1/2 but take an 11 in trail runners.







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    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottP View Post
    Montrail got bought out by Columbia recently and has had a SEVERE drop in quality (there are 2-3 threads floating around WB about this problem. ). Unless you have access to old-style hard rocks, I'd stay away from montrail.

    Montrail boots made my arches hurt like crazy even when I tried them for a few minutes in the outfitters. I am also flat footed and I pronate.







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    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxNcathy View Post
    Trail runners last about 800 miles for some hikers so good to have back ups.

    I replaced mine very freqently, it was just something I did. I used a total of four pairs from Harpers Ferry to Maine (about 300 miles on each pair give or take). I figured if I took care of my feet, they will take me where I want to go. It was a good investment for me. Many go much longer in their runners. I didn't, esp with the rocky terrain in the northern part of the trail. You might be able to go longer in runners in the southern section (I wore boots then). The runners got ripped up some in the Whites but I was amazed how well Brooks held up, really.







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    What model of Brooks Trail runners did you wear, Blissful? Did they last more than 300 miles?
    Thanks

  18. #18

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    Love my Salomon XA Pro 3D's. They also come in a Goretex version. Nice large toe box has been the great definer between these and other shoes I've tried. The lacing system still gives me all the control I need and keeps the rest of my foot secure from developing hotspots.

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    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxNcathy View Post
    What model of Brooks Trail runners did you wear, Blissful? Did they last more than 300 miles?
    Thanks

    Hi!
    I used Brooks Adrenaline ASR. And they will probably last more than 300 miles. Esp if you interchange insoles. They hold up very well and are quite durable. My only problem was the very tip of the sole by the toe became detached, in which I just cut it off because it stuck out and could have caused a tripping issue. I did get two pairs of free runners from Brooks because of the issue (they were also the older model). Hopefully they put better cement on the toe sole part when they redid the model for this year. No other problems with them. Love them.







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  20. #20
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmcatl View Post
    Love my Salomon XA Pro 3D's. They also come in a Goretex version. Nice large toe box has been the great definer between these and other shoes I've tried. The lacing system still gives me all the control I need and keeps the rest of my foot secure from developing hotspots.

    I really liked my Salomon GTX canyon boot and wore them for the first part of the hike. But they didn't offer my pronating feet the support I needed long distance and eventually I developed a calf issue - which is what led me to switch to trail runners. But my son wore his until he wore them out. Good boot. I once got Salomon trail runners to try but they ended up too narrow for me, sadly enough.







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