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Poll: How many folks just clean their pot with dirt and leaves

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Thread: Grab the Leaves

  1. #1

    Default Grab the Leaves

    How many folks just clean there pot with dirt and leaves.

  2. #2
    Jaybird's Avatar
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    Default pot cleaning

    leaves, sticks & handi-wipes...oh my!


    i've actually tried this...& it DOES work!


    but, most times i use a wet wipe or handi-wipe.





    see ya'll UP the trail!
    see ya'll UP the trail!

    "Jaybird"

    GA-ME...
    "on-the-20-year-plan"

    www.trailjournals.com/Jaybird2013

  3. #3

    Default

    I don't have to ever clean my pot - ziplock cooking is great all the "mess" is in the ziplock that the food was packed in with - the pot is only used to boil water

  4. #4
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    Default

    I've used dirt and pinecone to really clean a gooy pot. Works great. Never thought of using leaves. Will give that a try. Love all the useful tips I learn from this site.

  5. #5

    Default

    I first heard of using sand back when I was 13 in the scouts. I tried it once at a stream on bacon grease. What a mess.

    Thirty five years later, a fellow showed me that dry dirt or sand works great to clean greasy dishes. Dry is the secret. I just take some dirt or sand (often from under a shelter, where it stays dry even in winter) and mix it around in the pot, using it like scouring powder. It is fine to mix some leaves in too.

    When done, there is just a little dust left. I rinse that out before cooking the next meal.
    Walk Well,
    Risk

    Author of "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike"
    http://www.wayahpress.com

    Personal hiking page: http://www.imrisk.com

  6. #6
    Section Hiker 350 miles DebW's Avatar
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    Default snow

    Snow is a good abrasive pot cleaner too. Though when there's snow on the ground, it's generally too cold for bacteria to grow in your pot anyway. Pot cleaning does avoid the oft-repulsive mixing of meal flavors. But sometimes you get lucky - curried oatmeal turned out to be pretty good!

  7. #7
    Registered Troll
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flyfisher
    I just take some dirt or sand (often from under a shelter, where it stays dry even in winter) and mix it around in the pot, using it like scouring powder.
    mouse turds! scrub reel well, good aftertaste too YUM

  8. #8

    Default

    I'm lazy. I use just my fingers and water and I clean the pot before anything dries. Shirt tail or bandana can deal with the last greasy films from mac-n-cheese, olive oil, and the like.

  9. #9
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    Default

    I tend to just use lukewarm water and my finger to clean out a messy pot, but I resort to a paper towel or dry sand when I have something really messy that I don't want to put in my pack.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Monster
    I'm lazy. I use just my fingers and water and I clean the pot before anything dries. Shirt tail or bandana can deal with the last greasy films from mac-n-cheese, olive oil, and the like.
    I'm with Moon moster on this. If I am running ahead on tp, I might get the last remnant out with a square of tp. No need for soap. It is likely to make you sick if you don't have enough water for a good rinse. I just rinse it with water, drink the rinse water and it is good to go.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jumble Jowls
    mouse turds! scrub reel well, good aftertaste too YUM
    Good point. I have begun finding the dirt to clean my pot away from the shelter.
    Walk Well,
    Risk

    Author of "A Wildly Successful 200-Mile Hike"
    http://www.wayahpress.com

    Personal hiking page: http://www.imrisk.com

  12. #12
    Addicted Hiker and Donating Member Hammock Hanger's Avatar
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    Default

    I have always like using the leaves. Then you can scatter, bury or burn. It is important for the hiker to really clean the pot by eating ALL of it, but I doubt that is much of a problem for most of us. -- This is what I do with the kids that I take hiking. It is called "Duffing the Dish" and believe me when I tell them what we are going to do they freak. How will we eat breakfast tomorrow... In the clean pot, but we are putting dirt in it....
    KIDS!!! I don't like the bandana idea because I feel that the bandana harbors germs and promotes illness. This from the chick that doesnot filter or treat her water. Sue/HH
    Hammock Hanger -- Life is my journey and I'm surely not rushing to the "summit"...:D

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  13. #13
    ME-GA 2000 NotYet's Avatar
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    When by myself, I usually pour a tiny bit of water in the pot, wipe the food residue off with my finger, then drink the "yummy concoction"...Nothing is wasted!

    When I'm backpacking with others, we make sure all solid scraps are out of the pot, and then we we scrub with leaves, and/or snow and sand if available. The pot ends up shiny and clean! I personally avoid using lots of dirt, because I don't find it to be as effective. When we boil water for the next meal, we sterilize everyone's bowl, spoon, etc.!

    I agree with avoiding bandanas, scrubbie pads, and especially clothing. They're havens for growing bacteria, and I have witnessed food scent on clothing leading to skunks crawling on top of sleeping campers in the middle of the night (the food smells attract other animals, too...mice, bear, etc.).

  14. #14
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    Default plastic onion sack

    I like to use the sacks from veggies, the mesh kind. When done I snap the sack like a towel and put the dishes in it and hang it up to dry.

  15. #15
    Registered User Doctari's Avatar
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    Default

    I voted "I have a bandana or camp rag" I actually use neither, I use a net bag from a small ham (or turkey, or chicken, etc) & it works like magic. I call it my "scrubby", to clean the scrubby, a quick snap & rinse with a little water. When I get into town & rinse it in hot water "just in case". I have curt open both ends of my bag (actually a tube, with metal clamps to hold it closed, I cut off the clamps), so can't use it like todd05 do to hang the dishes to dry, but thats a good idea.
    Curse you Perry the Platypus!

  16. #16
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    Default

    at least 10 characters
    Last edited by Jersey Bob; 10-27-2004 at 13:51.

  17. #17
    Registered User sloetoe's Avatar
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    ### Heya, HH! Is you back in civil-libation yet? Yer hike continue OK? You heading to the Gathering?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammock Hanger
    This is what I do with the kids that I take hiking. It is called "Duffing the Dish" and believe me when I tell them what we are going to do they freak. How will we eat breakfast tomorrow... In the clean pot, but we are putting dirt in it.... KIDS!!!
    ### Even after weeks on trail, Bug and Magic could not observe me doing this without comment. Once I had to show 'em the bright&shiney pot, even, and they *still* had to comment.

    [Q] I don't like the bandana idea because I feel that the bandana harbors germs and promotes illness. This from the chick that doesnot filter or treat her water. Sue/HH
    ### Heh! Anuther non-Filterite! Woo-hoo!

  18. #18
    Long Trail '04
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    Default

    I just hand wash the pot in the nearest stream. Fingers work fine.

  19. #19
    Section Hiker 500 miles smokymtnsteve's Avatar
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    Default

    I use a bandana to clean my pots ...also I steam clean my pots and bandana by putting just a small amount of water in the pot putting in the bananda and then "cook" it until steaming hot. keeps things fairly germ free.
    "I'd rather kill a man than a snake. Not because I love snakes or hate men. It is a question, rather, of proportion." Edward Abbey

  20. #20
    2005 Camino de santiago
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    Default Clean my Pot?

    Finger, a little water & air dry. But never near a stream

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