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  1. #1
    Registered User Capt Chaos's Avatar
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    01-18-2004
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    Default Work For Stay...

    Hey guys, Capt Chaos reporting.
    My question is do many hostels accept a work for stay deal? Such as showing up in the afternoon and working for them for the rest of the afternoon. This will be a big help to my adventure. Thanks a lot guys.

    Signing off,
    Capt Chaos

  2. #2

    Default

    I think most of them will work something out with you. There are several that are run on donation only basis, also, and the donation usually suggested is nominal for the hospitality you'll get (often ~$4).

  3. #3

    Default Work Stays

    I don't know about "most" but there are certainly many places where work-for-stay is an option, tho a lot of places aren't that thrilled about offering it anymore since so many hikers take advantage of this opportunity by either doing a lousy or incomplete job, shirking, etc. It's very simple-----if you're offferred a chance to work off some or all of your stay, then make sure you DO THE WORK, i.e. if you're supposed to be cleaning a bunkroom or bathroom, then make sure you actually clean it. If you're chopping wood, or doing yardwork, or whatever, then actually make an effort to do it. A "work stay" job usually involves less than 3 hours of workand often less; sometimes it's a lot less, so make sure you actually put some effort into it. There are places that no longer offer work stays because they've been screwed by too many lazy hikers, and this really messes things up for budget-conscous hikers that pass thru later that really need these work-stay options. It's very simple: Don't ask about doing a work-stay unless you're actually willing to do the work.

    Also, even tho your Companion or Handbook might state that a place offers work-stay, don't immediately take for granted that this will be the case when you get there----maybe when you arrive there is simply no work to be done that day; maybe you're the fifth person that arrived that day that inquired about doing some work. In short, work stays are not something you should take for granted, even at places that "advertise" that this is an option.

    Lastly, most "work stay" jobs involve cleaning, yard work, etc., i.e. work that requires neither specialized skills or much brain work. In some cases, however, places are looking for workers who actually need to know what they're doing, so don't take a painting or carpentry job unless you feel confident about what you've been asked to do, especially if it involves power tools, machinery, hostel vehicles, etc. I've seen well-meaning "work stay" hikers really **** things up with bad paint jobs, horrible carpentry, destroying hand tools, etc., and this creates a lot of ill will, in addition to making sure that these places are leery of hiker workers in the future. In short, don't offer to a job you can't handle, and don't volunteer for ANY job that you're not willing to actually do, and do well.

  4. #4
    Registered User Peaks's Avatar
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    09-04-2002
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    Default Work for stay

    With the exception of the AMC, I would discourage anyone from even thinking about a work for stay.

    First, most of the places are run out of love, not for the money. They are a very thread bare operations.

    Second, the cost of most hostels isn't that much, usually $10 or less.

    Third, why not just offer to help out? Cut the grass, weed, help with the cleaning, etc. Pitch in where ever needed. It's a great way to get to know people.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peaks
    With the exception of the AMC, I would discourage anyone from even thinking about a work for stay.

    First, most of the places are run out of love, not for the money. They are a very thread bare operations.

    Second, the cost of most hostels isn't that much, usually $10 or less.

    Third, why not just offer to help out? Cut the grass, weed, help with the cleaning, etc. Pitch in where ever needed. It's a great way to get to know people.
    Peaks you are wonderful and you beat me to it.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peaks
    Third, why not just offer to help out? Cut the grass, weed, help with the cleaning, etc. Pitch in where ever needed. It's a great way to get to know people.
    Peaks makes an excellent point. One of the most pathetic sights i saw on my thru was coming out of the shower at the church hostel in Manchester Center, VT and seeing a dozen or so thrus standing and joking around in the common area -- while the Pastor was busy sweeping up around them.

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