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  1. #1
    The Wandering Bull - AT&FT EndToEnder 2005 djessop's Avatar
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    Default Shelters in August

    Hi...

    I am planning to do a thru-hike of the LT beginning August 2, 2008. I will probably do it on the fast side averaging about 25 miles/day. My hope is not to bring a shelter of any sort with me, relying on the shelters along the trail.

    When I thru-hiked the AT back in '05, I rolled through the LT/AT section in early-mid June and there were three consecutive nights in which the only occupants of the shelter were insects, slugs, and me...The Wandering Bull.
    A friend of mine did the New England portion of the AT in July 2006 and he told me that the shelters along the LT/AT were absolutely packed and he had to tent it...

    So the question is, how likely would it be to encounter full shelters on the LT in early-mid August.

    Also, would you consider this an ideal time for hiking the LT?

    Thanks...

    The Wandering Bull
    AT / FT 2005

  2. #2
    Registered User Seeker's Avatar
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    Default

    can't speak for the shelters, but it's always a bad idea to 'hope' for shelter... at least bring a poncho so you can hole up under it if need be.

  3. #3
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    Default

    As above, at least bring a small tarp.

    I'd say September would be the nicest time to hike. Less heat, less people, beginning of foliage, etc

    25 miles per day, huh? 11 days end to end. Very fast hike. Especially on the northern half. Don't blink or you'll miss the scenery.
    I was self employed once, but it proved too stressful. My boss was a jerk and my employee was a slacker - I didn't know whether to quit or fire myself.

  4. #4

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    My hike was mid-August to mid-September. For me, I never had a problem finding space in a shelter. And I don't recall any shelters being full where latecomers couldn't get in. Only once (Kid Gore Shelter) was I completely alone.

    That said, I still think it's a good idea to bring at least a tarp since you're hiking in the midst of AT thruhikers. I hiked the Southern half of Vermont in September past the peak of thrus.

    As I said in the other thread, you won't find many other hikers north of Rt. 108 so you shouldn't have a problem with shelter availability there.

  5. #5

    Default About the mileage

    If you can do 25 miles-per-day from Appalachian Gap to Whiteface Mountain (about 52 miles, 2 days of hiking), I'll tip my hat to you. And per 4-Eyed Buzzard, don't miss the views at that breakneck speed.

  6. #6
    The Wandering Bull - AT&FT EndToEnder 2005 djessop's Avatar
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    Many of you seem to think I was asking for your judgment of my hiking style and at no point did I indicate it. I walked from Georgia to Maine in 2005 in 3 months 24 days (including 17 zeros) and I enjoyed the scenery quite a bit, thank you very much. Hike your own hike kids.

    Thank you for the tips to those who actually provided useful and genuine answers.

  7. #7
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    I will also try to dissuade you from going without some sort of emergency shelter, especially as a number of the New England universities seem to encourage group outings just before school starts that can (inappropriately) fill up a shelter. Plus, if you're planning on averaging 25 mpd then you'll likely be arriving toward evening when there is less chance of shelter availability.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  8. #8
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    North of rt. 4, Rutland, VT most of the shelters will probably have available space and most empty or 1 or 2 people. Friday or saturday nights may be dirfferent. The southern VT shelters can fill around Straton area, very popular during your hiking times. Write back after your hike and best of luck with the 25 miles a day. I did 20-25 miles a day below rt 4 and 15 above. It's like two different trails, but hey, I'm a lot older.

  9. #9
    Registered User DavidNH's Avatar
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    Default on the long trail

    once you get north of the AT section (route 4) there should be far less people. Still bring a tarp or SOMETHING just in case you don't make it to the next shelter for what ever reason.

    It will be a major challenge to avg 25 miles a day on the Long Trail. The northern section is probably more difficult than almost any part of the AT. But if you did as you say the whole AT in 3 and a half months with 17 zero days, than you can probably speed hike the LT to.

    I can't help but ask my self why.. but I guess to each his own.

    David

  10. #10

    Default

    I section hiked the LT over a few years, mostly in September. I highly recommend that time of year for reasons mentioned above. If you start early in September, you'll still be able to enjoy the swimming available at a few of the ponds that the trail passes.
    Yes, DO bring some sort of shelter. If you're not a poncho user, look at the floorless shelter from Six Moon Designs, or the Gatewood Cape, the inspiration for the shelter. If you bring a hammock, you probably won't need bug netting if you have a little insect repellant on the warmer nights. A basic nylon hammock weighs a pound or less with another 5 oz. or so for ropes or straps. With a poncho or small tarp over it, it makes a fine shelter. Bring a "sit pad" of closed cell foam to double as torso insulation on chilly nights if you bring a hammock.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11
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    Default Right time is when I'm there!

    Quote Originally Posted by djessop View Post
    Hi...

    I am planning to do a thru-hike of the LT beginning August 2, 2008. I will probably do it on the fast side averaging about 25 miles/day. My hope is not to bring a shelter of any sort with me, relying on the shelters along the trail.

    When I thru-hiked the AT back in '05, I rolled through the LT/AT section in early-mid June and there were three consecutive nights in which the only occupants of the shelter were insects, slugs, and me...The Wandering Bull.
    A friend of mine did the New England portion of the AT in July 2006 and he told me that the shelters along the LT/AT were absolutely packed and he had to tent it...

    So the question is, how likely would it be to encounter full shelters on the LT in early-mid August.

    Also, would you consider this an ideal time for hiking the LT?

    Thanks...

    The Wandering Bull
    AT / FT 2005
    Hey Bull!!! I'm going SOBO, so I'd love to meet up with you this year and visit a minute or two. Should be in Vermont in mid August... Do you need another hair cut? Oh, and since Lion King is out in Colorado, I'll know it's you...

  12. #12

    Default

    LT in mid to early august is going to be hot (by new england standards) and potentially dry water sources. There will be some significant haze most days and dont worry about the views, a good day in august has less than a 50 mile view due to the haze. Good chance of afternoon thundershowers. It does clear after a front goes through. Shelters south of AT junction have a high likelihood of being full especially the ones near water as that area is popular for group trips until after Labor day (thus the recomendations by folks to shift to a Sept trip) North of AT junction, except the area around Mansfield, should have less shelter use. The farther north you go the less people.

  13. #13
    The Wandering Bull - AT&FT EndToEnder 2005 djessop's Avatar
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    hey red hat!!! i don't look much like lion king these days but a haircut may be in order!!! hope to see you on the trail.

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