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  1. #1

    Default Anyone seen this wax stove in use?

    On another site, someone is looking at this wax stove for winter use. Anyone have any experiance using it? Cost is $129, you can see a demo video on the manufactureers site here....

    http://www.gattgen.com/

    Thread on the other site is...
    http://forums.backpacker.com/cgi-bin...ntry9992154588

    .

  2. #2
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    No - I would not buy it - clearly it needs priming ( that is what they are doing in the lighting video) and the yellow flame means it's NOT hot enough.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

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    Registered User q-tip's Avatar
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    Sorry--try to get that started on a windy evening when you are starving and freezing---no thanks- I will keep my Soto

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    From the video, it doesn't look like the easiest thing to use with mittens or gloves. Seemed to need a lot of attention to get it going. If I needed a winter stove I think I'd look for something simpler to get lit. Just my opinion from a first look.

  5. #5

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    Definately a unique stove - I almost think I want one - if it were just a little less expensive.

    It looks a little small to cook a full meal on, seems to be more suited for a cup of soup or hot drink. For dead of winter, I'd still want to go with a white gas stove. You need some serious BTU's in the dead of winter. It could be handy to use for a lamp and then make that hot drink later in the evening without messing with the real stove.

    Keeping a supply of wax for it on a long trip could be a problem, but it will burn alcohol too. But then if your going to burn alcohol anyway, there are lighter and much, much cheaper alturnatives.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

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    It would be fun to try out. Curious how you load the wax. Curious if it would burn vegetable oil.

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    Looks legit. I think I can get that burn rate with a simple wick stove, for vegetable oil or wax, with less fuss and weight, but not as clean burning.

  8. #8

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    looking at the greasy black coating on the pot I doubt it is all that clean burning

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    Good gracious, how many steps does it take to light that stove? Do this, pull that, add wax, blah, blah, blah.

    Another good reason why a simple alchy stove is hard to beat on the trail.

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    A vegetable oil burning stove is very tempting, if you can get it to work.
    Fuel is also backup food. Fuel is relatively cheap and available.
    About twice the btu per pound vs methanol.

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    I don't see it being suitable at all for backpacking because it's a hassle to use, doesn't put out much heat, and doesn't seem to be wind resistant. It might be useful as an emergency stove at home where you can find wax or oil to put into it, and where there's plenty of protection from the wind. It's quite expensive though. One possible advantage for travel is that you might be able to travel with wax fuel, where you wouldn't be able to travel with liquid or gaseous fuels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leaftye View Post
    I don't see it being suitable at all for backpacking because it's a hassle to use, doesn't put out much heat, and doesn't seem to be wind resistant. It might be useful as an emergency stove at home where you can find wax or oil to put into it, and where there's plenty of protection from the wind. It's quite expensive though. One possible advantage for travel is that you might be able to travel with wax fuel, where you wouldn't be able to travel with liquid or gaseous fuels.
    While waxes are generally allowed (don't tell them it's fuel) I'm looking at a stove thing with some waxy substance and a wick and burner and scorch marks and soot - and I'll guaranty that thing winds up in the TSA bin. Where can't you buy fuel anyway?

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    The heat output is ok, but I would like to see how it works in cold weather. I don't mind the steps involved. They seem straightforward once you figure all they are doing is preheating it. It seems like it would work as well with vegetable oil as melted wax. You would still need some alcohol, for priming, but I like the idea of a combo stove that works with both. If it also burned wood or char that would be better. Sketchy about how this is actually built. It looks like something using cheap lamp parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    While waxes are generally allowed (don't tell them it's fuel) I'm looking at a stove thing with some waxy substance and a wick and burner and scorch marks and soot - and I'll guaranty that thing winds up in the TSA bin. Where can't you buy fuel anyway?
    Catalina Island. Remote trips in Alaska. In the latter case, it seems the bush pilots are willing to overlook fuel being carried on board.

    If you have the wax in the stove, I can see why they'd confiscate it...they'd figure out that the wax is the fuel. If there was no wax in it, they'd have little reason to confiscate it since it's perfectly acceptable to carry an empty used stove.

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    I'm going to take another crack at making a decent veggie oil burner.

  16. #16

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    good luck - I was never able to get veg. oil to burn clean but looking at what was shown in the video of the wax stove I suspect a similar technique might work - that is to say to have a heat feedback loop thingy to preheat the fuel, then a wicked primary burner, then a screen and a secondary burn area for the fumes produced by the air flow restricted primary burner

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    I have found with a small batch feed, less than 1 ounce, there is less need to use a loop to preheat the fuel. The flame itself will heat the fuel up fairly quick, as long as it is well insulated, from the ground as well as the sides. EXTREME CAUTION must be made with regard to liquid oil or wax in this type of stove, as it gets EXTREMELY HOT, like 500F HOT. So really stable platform, and don't put it on something like a blue foam pad or tent floor. Also, after a minute or so after lighting, assume it is bone charring hot, as it soon will be. 0.5 oz is enough for about 2 cups of water, so keep it small, and keep it from spilling and splashing or splattering. Have fun.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    A vegetable oil burning stove is very tempting, if you can get it to work.
    Fuel is also backup food. Fuel is relatively cheap and available.
    About twice the btu per pound vs methanol.
    Vegetable oil and tp make a reasonable fire starter, but there's too much smoke.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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    I'll stick with my Trangia. Pour in fuel, light it. Dead simple.
    "You're a nearsighted, bitter old fool."

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    here a stove that burns alcohol and oil but not good for back packing fun to do in the camp grounds
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10lVe_cGn8k

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