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  1. #21
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    It just occurred to me that used sneakers in lots of snow with multiple stream crossings back in 2002. (The days were warm, however. But, cold nights)

    Worked like a champ.




    If Nike sneakers worked well in the High Sierra, they can probably work in the Appalachians.

    The only time I wear boots is for skiing or trail work. If there is too little snow for skis, then I am wearing trail runners.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  2. #22
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    I like slightly oversized trail runners in winter, for thicker socks, and replacing the insole with a thick felt insole. I still have trouble keeping snow out. I have gators but they are really heavy and snow still gets in. I think I will sew something on directly, like a nylon hiking pant material.

  3. #23
    Kilted Thru-Hiker AT'04, PCT'06, CDT'07 Haiku's Avatar
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    In trail runners, as long as you're hiking your feet will get wet, but they'll be wet and warm because of your exertion. When you stop, take off your shoes and socks and put on dry socks. The only time my feet got so cold that I had to stop and warm them because I couldn't feel them was after crossing a creek in the morning in the Sierra. Since the creek was above my knees boots wouldn't have helped at all.

    Haiku.

  4. #24
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    That's it. Trail runners that absorb too much water suck in snow.
    Next time I go shopping for trail runners I'm bringing a bucket of water and a stopwatch.

  5. #25
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    This article (How fast do popular lightweight hiking shoes dry after a thorough soaking?) was posted on Backpacking Light back in 2006. Very informative!

  6. #26

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    I started in Goretex boots this past year, had lots of rain, and found that if it was wet enough, even with the Goretex my feet got wet. When I switched to non-Goretex trail runners, they got wet faster, but they dried MUCH faster without the Goretex. I also used Smartwool socks, and carried a few pairs, so I always had a dry pair to put on the next day. This system worked for me: good socks (extra pairs), trail runners, no Goretex.

  7. #27
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    I used to hike in high quality leather boots (free from work) but once I tried some lighter weight styles I will never go back to the boots.

  8. #28
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    Here is that thread. I was saying I don't think all trail runners are equal in wet snow.
    Some behave like those annoying wool gloves with suede palms that just make the wool wet and cold and keep from drying. Trail runners for winter shouldn't be waterproof but they shouldn't absorb any water either. I read that article, but I don't think it tells the full story on trail runners in snow. I think there are some trail runners out there that don't absorb any. I don't mind felt liners, because you can take them out and they are warm when wet. Some trail runners are cold when wet, and make your wool socks colder and wetter. You don't want that. Mine that suck are Northface, with some suedey bits on the uppers, but I think the padding in the uppers and the tongue is equally offensive. They are ok in summer when you want to keep your feet cool, and they dry ok in summer also, but in wet snow conditions they suck. Not all trail runners are equal in snow. I think you have to do your own research to find a pair that work, and trade names and models don't help cause they keep changing. It might be harder to get a good fit, but I think you need something with a mesh that isn't padded and doesn't absorb water. In winter you can wear thicker socks for the padding.

  9. #29
    Peakbagger Extraordinaire The Solemates's Avatar
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    i used trail runners that were not waterproof and had holes in them this past week in PA while walking in anywhere from 1-10 inches of snow for 4 days. my feet were constantly wet and sometimes cold, but I learned to deal with it. its really not that bad if you are continually walking anyways. we had a fire every night, so i just warmed up my feet my it each night, then slept with wet socks. the socks were completely dry by the next morning when i had to put them back into frozen shoes It beat the alternative I had of either going to purchase a new pair or lugging my "mountaineering" boots that weigh over 5 lbs.
    The only thing better than mountains, is mountains where you haven't been.

    amongnature.blogspot.com

  10. #30
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    I don't mind hiking in damp wool socks, but there is a difference between trail runners that hold a little bit of water but don't keep your wool socks any wetter and trail runners that hold more water, and act like, well like suede palms on wool gloves, keeping your wool socks colder and wetter. I'm saying not all trail runners are equal in snow. I want them to be breathable, not waterproof, but non-absorbing, not like suede. There has to be a way of identifying trail runners that are good for snow, and trail runners that are not.

  11. #31

    Default Boots vs Trailrunners

    I thru'ed in '05 starting near the end of March...started off with Scarpa goretex, waterproofed mid-height boots and SmartWool Trekker socks (heavyweight, with much-appreciated extra thickness) carrying a 35-40 lb pack. It helped having the heavier boot in the beginning and even in rain/snow, my feet stayed dry, comfy and warm. I changed to a New Balance trailrunner in Damascus and had lots of problems with fit, leading to blisters and problems and had to change to Montrails in Pearisburg (drove to Blacksburg). Use a slightly oversized trailrunner, as your feet will take more of a beating in them and swell some, and you don't need tight fit problems. Trailrunners are great in VA, WV, MD and into PA. Helps having a tougher shoe in PA with all the rocks. NJ is good for a trailrunner, but in hindsight, I wish I had used boot in NY, MA, VT, NH & ME. The terrain is tougher and the extra support/padding would have helped foot comfort. Net/net... people do the entire trail in ALL kinds of shoes so you have to figure out what your budget, hiking style, personal comfort and circumstances will allow you and go for it. Have fun!
    ------------------------------
    Ga-ME 2005 March 27 - July 20.

  12. #32
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    1.
    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    Has anyone done any tests on trail runners to see how much water they absorb if you dunk them and drain them upside down for a minute, and then run around a track with them for 5 minutes, or something like that. I know the models change to fast anyways for such a test to be much good, but I am wondering how much trail runners vary in terms of there weight when wet and how fast they dry. Probably doesn't vary much.

    2. Has anyone sewn a gator to trail runners to make a sort of mukluk for winter?
    1. BackpackingLight archives has an extensive analysis of the water absorption of various models of trail shoe. There was a lot of variation. However, in all cases, trail runners absorb less than leather boots. Look for TRs with little if any padding. It is the padding that absorbs and holds water. Cheap trail shoes generally have the most padding.

    2. Not necessary. If you use stretch gaiters held down with a Velcro patch glued to the shoe heels, you can posthole without a problem.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tagless View Post
    This article (How fast do popular lightweight hiking shoes dry after a thorough soaking?) was posted on Backpacking Light back in 2006. Very informative!
    aw. come on. which shoe dries fastest? ...don't have access to that article.
    Lazarus

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1azarus View Post
    aw. come on. which shoe dries fastest? ...don't have access to that article.
    The ones they threw in the clothes dryer .

    I use Sealskinz in snow and cold rain and they keep my feet just warm enough. No wet wool socks. You can keep your socks from freezing by putting them in a plastic bag and taking them to bed with you. They won't dry out but they won't freeze your feet or wet out your bag either.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  15. #35
    Working on Forestry Grad schol
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    It's march in Georgia, not March in Alaska. Non-waterproof trail runners with some wool socks will be plenty.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1azarus View Post
    aw. come on. which shoe dries fastest? ...don't have access to that article.
    I think that article is flawed for wet snow conditions because it focused on drying time in warmer conditions. For wet snow conditions you simply want the pair that holds the least amount of water when soaked. Minimize wet weight minus dry weight. Then some sort of vbl or gortex or neoprene sock to wear over your wool socks in wet snow conditions. Otherwise your wool socks will also be saturated, almost instantly.

    They should really publish wet weight of fleece and socks and footwear, not just dry weight.

  17. #37
    Registered User lbbrown's Avatar
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    Default Try NEOS

    Trail runners are lite and comfortable. Carry NEOS overshoes for real wet hiking. They are liteweight and can add up to 40 degrees worth of insulation. Check out their website www.overshoe.com.I think Santa is bringing me some.

  18. #38

    Default Hey!

    Quote Originally Posted by lbbrown View Post
    Trail runners are lite and comfortable. Carry NEOS overshoes for real wet hiking. They are liteweight and can add up to 40 degrees worth of insulation. Check out their website www.overshoe.com.I think Santa is bringing me some.
    I've been looking for opinions on the NEOS insulated overshoes. Where have you BEEN?
    I'd like them to wear over trail runners in the dead of winter in the White Mountains (temps. from 30f to -30f).
    Think they'd be a viable option for snowshoeing?
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  19. #39
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    When it gets cowld and wet I go to a WP shoe and make every attempt to keep my feet dry.

    Of all the Goretex socks I've owned none stayed WP very long. Maybe, if I had seamsealed the stitching or were able to find one piece GoreTex socks(if they exist?) or the seams were welded or glued it would have been different. Sometimes the combo of Mysterios socks(the kind used by paddlers) or wool socks underneath sealskins or neoprene socks have kept my feet warm and realtively dry. Just watch out your dogs don't turn into prunes with that set up!

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