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  1. #1
    Registered User 2009ThruHiker's Avatar
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    Default Aluminum v. Carbon

    YOur Thoughts on Aluminum vs. Carbon when it comes to trekking poles...
    Aluminum bends...Carbon shatters.... Experiences???
    You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.

  2. #2
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    How about titanium? Lighter, smaller, and stronger than aluminum, but of course very pricey. I love my ti. leki poles. I have no experience with carbon fiber hiking poles, but when carbon fiber fails it does seem to explode.

  3. #3
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    You should be fine with either kind under normal use, just like any other piece of gear.
    It has been said that a journey begins with a single step. I say hogwash! It starts with a dream.

  4. #4
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    I second Picasso, the map feature that lets people see where the pic was taken really tips the scale for me.
    It has been said that a journey begins with a single step. I say hogwash! It starts with a dream.

  5. #5
    Registered User 2009ThruHiker's Avatar
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    what do u consider normal use? an AT Thru -hike? Or less daily wear and tear?
    You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by trouthunter View Post
    I second Picasso, the map feature that lets people see where the pic was taken really tips the scale for me.
    HAHa, I closed a tab I guess, wrong thread.
    My bad.
    It has been said that a journey begins with a single step. I say hogwash! It starts with a dream.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2009ThruHiker View Post
    what do u consider normal use? an AT Thru -hike? Or less daily wear and tear?
    Well, yes I would consider everyday use on the AT normal use.

    I have done a lot of southern sections, I don't consider the AT to be either rugged or challenging based on my experience, maybe the northern sections are more challenging.

    Go do the Blue Wall area (Blue Ridge Escarpment), or the Cumberland Plateau Escarpment area and you will see the difference.

    Like I said, maybe the northern sections are tougher, but I don't see any reason to be too concerned.
    It has been said that a journey begins with a single step. I say hogwash! It starts with a dream.

  8. #8
    Registered User Egads's Avatar
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    5 ounces of carbon for me baby
    The trail was here before we arrived, and it will still be here when we are gone...enjoy it now, and preserve it for others that come after us

  9. #9

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    4' of rebar...doesn't bend or shatter!

    geek

  10. #10
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    By experience, my first trekking poles were carbon and one broke on the first hike when I fell due to a log I stepped on breaking. When I took them back to REI, the sales guy said they had a lot of returns on the carbon ones breaking, and he personally recommended the slightly heavier aluminum ones.

    I've got a couple hundred miles on my REI Summit ones now and am extremely pleased with them. They were also half the price of the carbon ones I initially purchased. The few extra ounces do not fatigue my arms at all.

  11. #11
    Garlic
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    Good question. To my complete and utter surprise, my REI carbon poles lasted for my through hike this year. I found them on sale and thought I'd give them a try, and had my titanium poles for backup, but they actually made it. I also heard of many stories of carbon poles shattering when wedged in rock or on falls. Whenever I saw someone using them, I'd ask and they usually had a story. They survived a couple of good falls in ME.

    Some folks have problems with the joints sliding. I never had that problem.

    Would I recommend them? For a through hike, definitely. I think the light weight was worth it, for me. If you're a die-hard dirtbagger, no way, they're way too expensive. And they're probably not worth it for day hikes or sections, again, too expensive.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  12. #12
    Registered User Phreak's Avatar
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    Carbon is the way to go, imo.

  13. #13
    Just Hikin' Along
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechanic.mike View Post
    How about titanium? Lighter, smaller, and stronger than aluminum, but of course very pricey. I love my ti. leki poles. I have no experience with carbon fiber hiking poles, but when carbon fiber fails it does seem to explode.
    If you'll check the Leki site, you'll find that the material in each version of the Leki Ti poles is actually Aluminum 7075. Great marketing idea, but more than a bit deceptive.

    I've been using TiGoat adjustable CF poles at 6.4oz per pair since they were first introduced (actually had the very first pair ever produced commercially).


  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quoddy View Post
    If you'll check the Leki site, you'll find that the material in each version of the Leki Ti poles is actually Aluminum 7075. Great marketing idea, but more than a bit deceptive.

    I've been using TiGoat adjustable CF poles at 6.4oz per pair since they were first introduced (actually had the very first pair ever produced commercially).
    IT is great that you talk about ....YOU and YOUR gear...BUT ,does it hold UP?

  15. #15
    Just Hikin' Along
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow View Post
    IT is great that you talk about ....YOU and YOUR gear...BUT ,does it hold UP?
    The main point, in case you missed it, was that Leki "Titanium" are aluminum. But yes, my CF poles are going strong after well over 1000 miles in the Whites, the Greens, and the Adirondacks. I doubt that I'd ever consider going back to the "heavies".


  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quoddy View Post
    The main point, in case you missed it, was that Leki "Titanium" are aluminum. But yes, my CF poles are going strong after well over 1000 miles in the Whites, the Greens, and the Adirondacks. I doubt that I'd ever consider going back to the "heavies".
    What poles?

  17. #17
    Kilted Thru-Hiker AT'04, PCT'06, CDT'07 Haiku's Avatar
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    I've snapped a Leki Ti pole as well, so it doesn't have to be carbon fiber to break! I've also bent my poles and have been able to bend them back, so there is that. If they'd been carbon they would have broken.

    Haiku.

  18. #18
    Just Hikin' Along
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow View Post
    What poles?
    Are you referring to my CF poles? If so I gave the details in the previous post that you responded to... TiGoat adjustables (Titanium Goat brand).

    BTW, I have had a set of Leki Super Makalu Cor-Tec's since they first came out. I have a lot of miles on them, too. I do still use them occasionally in deep snow conditions because the CF's tend to defect, and weight in this case is a benefit. Would I recommend CF poles to everyone? No... particularly someone without significant experience using poles previously or anyone who completely abuses their sticks. I found that I place my poles with each plant, and that's easier with CF's. Although I get a lot of support from them, I use them just as much for balance and speed.


  19. #19
    Garlic
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    I for one got totally sucked in by Leki's "Ti" marketing scam. I can't believe it, and I fell for it. Thanks, Quoddy, for pointing that out. I will not buy another Leki product again. I'm happier now that I got the REI carbon poles, made my Komperdell, by the way, even though it was tough finding replacement tips along the AT last summer.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  20. #20

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    If you break your stick, do they give you carbon credits?

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