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  1. #21

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    The best ones are made of air. Very light, inexpensive and you can use your hands for other things. You never see athletes using poles and if there were an advantage they would be. There is a reason humans stopped using their arms for propulsion, millions of years ago. If you have knee pain try shorter distance, slower speed or less weight (get rid of pole weight). When you break your leg you don't use crutches forever. Granted pole scream "I AM A HIKER" and they sure look cool.

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    When carbon fiber poles break, do they splinter? (Thinking sailboat mast.)

    When Al or Ti poles break, do they bend?

  3. #23
    not very ultralight user Creepy Uncle's Avatar
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    Leki carbon polls aren't waranteed. the aluminum polls are.

  4. #24
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    The best ones are made of air. Very light, inexpensive and you can use your hands for other things. You never see athletes using poles and if there were an advantage they would be. There is a reason humans stopped using their arms for propulsion, millions of years ago. If you have knee pain try shorter distance, slower speed or less weight (get rid of pole weight). When you break your leg you don't use crutches forever. Granted pole scream "I AM A HIKER" and they sure look cool.
    Why do you non-believers in trekking poles feel compelled to butt in on every discussion of pole logistics thread?

    You are very unlikely to convince trekking pole users who positively have experienced the benefits of using them that their perception of those benefits is flawed. And if your family lineage sprung from apes, I guess that's your business, but mine didn't!

  5. #25
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudhead View Post
    When carbon fiber poles break, do they splinter? (Thinking sailboat mast.)

    When Al or Ti poles break, do they bend?
    Mine didn't splinter . . . it just snapped in half like a toothpick.

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    Deja vu ... I recall this same thread not too-o-o long ago, but maybe on another site.

    I'm a believer in CF poles; I have the REI branded Komperdell poles, and thru-hiked the PCT this year with them; I guess I've put 3000 miles on them now over the last 2 - 3 three years, replaced the tips once. A couple of times I've (very) temporarily loaned them to someone else, swapping pole sets briefly so the other person can try them out. The difference is very noticeable and I'm always happy to get my own poles back. It's a bit like the old saw about a pound on your feet is like X pounds on your back. In both cases (hands and feet) it's a repetitive motion you're doing all day long.

    I use one of my poles as a tent pole for my tarptent, and in fact I almost always over-extended the pole to make a longer tent pole, without problems.

    I'm not denying that people break these; it might be a matter of luck, it might be that my hiking style is a little less abusive in the way that might cause breakage. I don't use pole baskets, and if the tip catches in a hole I don't blast on forward and force the pole along, but stop and back up a little to pull it out. That sort of thing.

    While the adjusting mechanism on the REI CF pole might not be the best (occasional tinkering needed to get it to tighten up firmly), on the whole I'm really happy with these light, adjustable, non-shock-absorbing poles.


    Brian Lewis
    http://postholer.com/brianle

  7. #27
    Registered User Egads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Why do you non-believers in trekking poles feel compelled to butt in on every discussion of pole logistics thread?

    You are very unlikely to convince trekking pole users who positively have experienced the benefits of using them that their perception of those benefits is flawed. And if your family lineage sprung from apes, I guess that's your business, but mine didn't!
    Summit,

    I'm with you on this one.

    The original question is Aluminum vs Carbon, and not should I use trekking poles.

    Egads
    The trail was here before we arrived, and it will still be here when we are gone...enjoy it now, and preserve it for others that come after us

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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Mine didn't splinter . . . it just snapped in half like a toothpick.
    Sharp edges?

    A better question is which type is safer(or more dangerous) in a "fall involving breakage." Or some thing like that. I may try them someday.

  9. #29
    Kilted Thru-Hiker AT'04, PCT'06, CDT'07 Haiku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    You never see athletes using poles and if there were an advantage they would be.
    Every time I go on a thru-hike I see several hundred athletes using poles.

    Haiku.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haiku View Post
    Every time I go on a thru-hike I see several hundred athletes using poles.

    Haiku.
    Athletes and people who's knees appreciate them.

    Aluminum is my choice. I tend to put a lot of weight on them, not that I'm heavy, I just am not very coordinated with 40 pounds on my back. Okay, I am just not very coordinated, period.

  11. #31
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudhead View Post
    Sharp edges?

    A better question is which type is safer(or more dangerous) in a "fall involving breakage." Or some thing like that. I may try them someday.
    I don't think there is any difference. I was thankful that I did not fall on my broken pole . . . that could have had serious consequences. The edges where it snapped were not sharp, but with enough momentum and force, one could impale themselves on a blunt pole. But then, I've never heard of anyone being impaled on a broken trekking pole. It's certainly possible, but the likelihood is extremely slim. In conclusion, I would say that trekking poles have saved far more people from injury than they have caused injury.

  12. #32
    GA-VA 2005, VA-CT 2007, CT-ME ??
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    I've put a couple thousand miles on carbon fiber poles. I eventually broke one when it got wedged in a rock, but I doubt aluminum or Ti would have survived, either. I plan to keep on buying carbon fiber poles because the lower weight is so nice.

    -Mark

  13. #33
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    You never see athletes using poles and if there were an advantage they would be.
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidNH View Post
    Finally, when I thru hiked in 2006, practically every single thru hiker was using trekking poles. Even the ultra light types.
    DavidNH
    Hmmm, someone's accounting isn't adding up?

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Why do you non-believers in trekking poles feel compelled to butt in on every discussion of pole logistics thread?

    You are very unlikely to convince trekking pole users who positively have experienced the benefits of using them that their perception of those benefits is flawed. And if your family lineage sprung from apes, I guess that's your business, but mine didn't!
    It was clearly not a question of logistics (distribution of material or personnel???). It was a question about the best type of type of material. Air is clearly the correct material for hiking poles. Your perception is not flawed merely illusionary due to peer pressure and advanced marketing.

  15. #35
    Registered User 2009ThruHiker's Avatar
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    actually to clear this up from the original post...the question was:

    aluminum vs. carbon....


    not what's the best material.
    You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haiku View Post
    Every time I go on a thru-hike I see several hundred athletes using poles.

    Haiku.
    Yes there are walking races, but to call hiking the AT a walking race is just plain sad. I am aware some people compete on the AT but I doubt several hundred do so at any particular time. Most people walk.

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2009ThruHiker View Post
    actually to clear this up from the original post...the question was:

    aluminum vs. carbon....


    not what's the best material.
    You're correct, sorry. I withdraw air poles (although they are much lighter and cheaper).

  18. #38
    Registered User Summit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    It was clearly not a question of logistics (distribution of material or personnel???). It was a question about the best type of type of material. Air is clearly the correct material for hiking poles.
    Why don't you start a thread called "Why thousands of users are stupid and deceived by snake oil salesmen into thinking they are getting benefits from using trekking poles?" Then stay out of discussions about particulars for folks who do use them!

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    Your perception is not flawed merely illusionary due to peer pressure and advanced marketing.
    As I said in the last thread discussing pole particulars that you butted into with your "snake oil salesmen' diatribe, if you don't want to enjoy the real, tangible benefits of using trekking poles, that's great. Enjoy aching, sore knees and overly tired legs to your heart's content. But you should avoid insulting your own intelligence by claiming to know that what thousands of trekking pole users are experiencing as a result of using them is 'illusionary.' You will never convince me that my relatively 'fresh legs' at the end of a long day hiking is 'illusionary,' and I really don't care whether you ever believe that or not . . . I'm just tired of hearing it!

  19. #39
    Registered User Egads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Jay View Post
    It was clearly not a question of logistics (distribution of material or personnel???). It was a question about the best type of type of material. Air is clearly the correct material for hiking poles. Your perception is not flawed merely illusionary due to peer pressure and advanced marketing.
    BJ,

    I was once in the no pole camp until I tried them and found my uphill speed improved, my downhill knee strain lessened, and my pack weight dropped since they are my tarp poles. I use carbon fiber from Gossamer Gear with no problems. You just need to understand they are made for compression and not bending moments.

    Egads
    The trail was here before we arrived, and it will still be here when we are gone...enjoy it now, and preserve it for others that come after us

  20. #40
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    I love my carbon poles. My friend has aluminum and we switched for a couple miles on the AT. The biggest thing I noticed was that the carbon poles soak up the vibration on every pole plant where the aluminum poles translate the vibration right up to your hands this is especially noticeable when hiking over rocks.

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