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  1. #1
    Registered User wtmntcaretaker's Avatar
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    Default Danger on the PCT?

    So I am a proud AT2008 thru hiker and am already saving for the PCT in 2011. I grew up in the east and new about what I had in store for myself in the east. But for the PCT and being so close to the Mexican border I was looking for information about murder and deaths on the PCT. Being a single female hiker I always need to reinforce saftey so my mom wont cry. I couldnt find much other than hypotermia and 2 hikers getting hit by a car.
    Dose anyone know if there have been murders along the PCT? and were and when and all that jazz?

  2. #2
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    Hmm...I've read that there has NEVER been a murder on the PCT proper...the book is a few years old, though.

  3. #3
    Registered User A-Train's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wtmntcaretaker View Post
    So I am a proud AT2008 thru hiker and am already saving for the PCT in 2011. I grew up in the east and new about what I had in store for myself in the east. But for the PCT and being so close to the Mexican border I was looking for information about murder and deaths on the PCT. Being a single female hiker I always need to reinforce saftey so my mom wont cry. I couldnt find much other than hypotermia and 2 hikers getting hit by a car.
    Dose anyone know if there have been murders along the PCT? and were and when and all that jazz?
    Very safe. Unlike the AT I haven't heard of any murders of hikers. Illegals and hikers having altercations is not an issues. I hiked section A the last 3 yrs in a row. Saw a few illegals my 3rd time and they waved. They are trying to fly under the radar, not draw attention. Usually fly thru the night. You will see their clothes, water bottles, cans, etc.
    Start at KIckoff and this will be a NON-issue. dozens of hikers start last 2 weeks in April, first week in May.

    The only danger on the PCT is slipping off a snowy icey pass or a strong ford in the Sierra, but this is stuff you'll be ready for.

    I felt safer on the PCT than the AT. Less people but less town encroachment. You don't hike thru people's backyards on the PCT. Maybe that makes some feel safer, me the opposite. you'll be fine.
    Anything's within walking distance if you've got the time.
    GA-ME 03, LT 04/06, PCT 07'

  4. #4
    Garlic
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    The illegals are either trying to get to work, or trying to get some illegal work done. Zero interest in hikers. They're not out to "get you".
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  5. #5
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    Doesn't matter if 1000 hikers get murdered on the PCT every yr. or no one ever has. Ask yourselves - HOW DO U WANT TO LIVE YOUR LIVES??? In faith or fear? Absolutely, YOUR CHOICE! If U or your mother HAVE DECIDED to live in fear no amount of statistics will completely resolve your fear! May be hard to hear or accept, paricularly if U R accustomed to being governed by fear, but that is the choice! Learn to live in trust, love, and faith and see how it frees U!

  6. #6
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    I am guessing but what I think your really asking is what is the crime rate down by the border of Mexico. Once you get 100 miles away the violent crime rate probobly drops close to zero.

    The majority of illegals do not want to draw any attention to themselves so they are not looking for a confrontation. Drug runners may use illegals to transport drugs, but again, they do not want to draw attention to themselves.

    Most serious crimes occur right inside the border towns. Make your start on your side of the border, in broad daylight, early in the morning and move away from the border in a reasonable amount of time and you will not have any problems. The one thing to be aware of is that residents who live near the border but outside of towns get a bit wary of strangers passing through. They may not always be the friendliest.

    Border towns are not like other towns inside the US or inside Mexico. They seem to attract the worst from both sides. I would not hesitate to start my hike at the border, but I would think twice about spending any appreciable amount of time across the border in one of them quaint border towns.

  7. #7
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    I thought the minuteman militia yahoos sitting there by the border "protecting" us from the folks trying to cross and get a job were about the scariest thing I saw in my 1500 miles thru California.

    You'll be fine. Have fun out there.
    What? Me worry??

  8. #8
    Registered User Desert Reprobate's Avatar
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    Minute Men simply observe and report to the Border Patrols.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by yaduck9 View Post
    Border towns are not like other towns inside the US or inside Mexico. They seem to attract the worst from both sides. I would not hesitate to start my hike at the border, but I would think twice about spending any appreciable amount of time across the border in one of them quaint border towns.
    Campo isn't a border town per se because there's no nearby crossing.

    On the PCT the 1st day I camped at Hauser Creek (15 miles) and at 5AM a bunch of illegals passed. No problems.


    It would be a long day but most seem to do it these days is hike to Lake Moreno County Park (20 mi). From there it's not likely you'll run into illegals.

    It's not hard finding a partner for the PCT, and there's lots of hiker now-a-days. Join the pct-l www.backcountry.net

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Reprobate View Post
    Minute Men simply observe and report to the Border Patrols.
    They also helped put up a fence to keep people away from the border fence and adorned it with various racist slogans. New addition since 2003 and I feel much safer. The PCT is far safer than the AT, especially once you get out of the LA area. The remoteness and distance from roads keeps criminals out. On the AT, you're rarely more than a short walk from a road and criminals can get out to you with little difficulty.

  11. #11
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    I was hiking solo last year, and also camped at Hauser Creek my first night. While cooking dinner, I looked up to see a group of about 10-15 illegals headed up the trail past my camp. They observed me as they passed, but it was fairly clear they wanted to just move on without any kind of interaction.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayfly View Post
    I was hiking solo last year, and also camped at Hauser Creek my first night. While cooking dinner, I looked up to see a group of about 10-15 illegals headed up the trail past my camp. They observed me as they passed, but it was fairly clear they wanted to just move on without any kind of interaction.
    I'm fairly sure they've been passing through there regularly for years since I was there in '99. You'd think the Border Patrol would set up a sting.

  13. #13

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    Mayfly, you should consider attending the PCTKO before starting the CDT. Lots of snow in CO. Don't want to get there too quick, and if you'll get you to Glacier at a good time. There's usually a few CDT hikers that attend the KO. Fun!

  14. #14
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    Default Pctko

    Hi Sly

    I've been hearing rumors of "lots of snow" in southern CO. Postholer seems to indicate the same. I'm bringing my ax and spikes, and have been kicking around whether or not to bring the snowshoes. I'll probably wait and see on those though.

    You probably have the right idea on waiting a bit, but I've already booked my flight to El Paso, and confirmed my ride out to Crazy Cook around 4/23.

    I guess that is what I get for planning too far ahead.... Maybe next year.

    Thanks!

    Ellie

  15. #15
    Registered User gravityman's Avatar
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    Default

    It's way to early to even guess at the snow pack in the San Juan's in June. It all depends on how the spring melt goes. But my guess is you'll need those snow shoes, or take lower routes. Postholing through crusty snow is very painful and gets real old. But maybe you've been there (I have). It's still hard even with the snow shoes, as the snow tends to be in drifts with a lot of waviness and sun cupping. But I'm probably preaching to the choir.

    G

  16. #16
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    It's way to early to even guess at the snow pack in the San Juan's in June. It all depends on how the spring melt goes.

    Ditto

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    It's way to early to even guess at the snow pack in the San Juan's in June. It all depends on how the spring melt goes.

    Ditto
    Yeah, think? So far it's above normal. More so than in 2007 when I was there and only a couple hardly souls attempted to get through without road walking.

    http://postholer.com/postholer/index.php

    I wouldn't count on above average melt. I also wouldn't road walk what's arguably the best section of trail but flip. Mayfly's early start and suggested mileage will get her to Cumbres Pass early June.

    We needed to bail after 4 days, only be able to average 10 mpd.

  18. #18
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    Default Southern CO

    All good feedback...thanks. Snowshoeing in hard or wet snow is definitely a bit tedious. I've been grumbling my way around here in CT for the past several weeks. Been doing more light postholing than anything else, but at least it keeps my legs in shape.

    I'll guage the snow when I get there, but judging by a few journals I've checked out from past years, I will definitely want to give thought to heading through the San Juans too early in June, with a lot of snow.

    I'll judge the conditions when I get closer, and possibly reach out for some feedback from those that live a little nearer the area, a week or two out.

    All feedback and opinions is always welcomed. Thanks

    Ellie

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mayfly View Post
    Hi Sly

    I've been hearing rumors of "lots of snow" in southern CO. Postholer seems to indicate the same. I'm bringing my ax and spikes, and have been kicking around whether or not to bring the snowshoes. I'll probably wait and see on those though.

    You probably have the right idea on waiting a bit, but I've already booked my flight to El Paso, and confirmed my ride out to Crazy Cook around 4/23.

    I guess that is what I get for planning too far ahead.... Maybe next year.

    Thanks!

    Ellie
    Yeah, I just read about your reservations on your journal. It's a little far to get to the KO from El Paso. You'll be fine, but have a plan to flip. Most northbounders usually have to, or do lots of road walking missing the South San Juans and the Weminuche.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Doesn't matter if 1000 hikers get murdered on the PCT every yr. or no one ever has.
    Um... Yes it does. If I heard that 3/4 of all airplane flights ended with a crash landing, guess what? I won't be flying. It isn't a matter of fear, it is a matter of being smart enough to know when the odds are against you and you won't survive them beating you.

    Guess what else? I won't be hiking in Columbia anytime soon because of all the kidnappings and murders. It doesn't mean that I am living in fear, it just means that I am smart enough to know that the area is not safe.

    Knowlege is key. With the right knowledge, you can make wise decisions...
    Nothing is foolproof to a talented fool.

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