Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Registered User wtmntcaretaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-02-2007
    Location
    Three Rivers, Ca
    Posts
    163
    Images
    12

    Default what gear did you use?

    I was looking for input on what are the big three that people have used on the PCT? Backpack, Sleeping bag and Shelter? I have an idea of what people used on the AT this past year and what I used for the AT but I would like to see if there are differences in gear and weight and what not.

  2. #2

    Default

    i thought when i used it it was lighter then my freinds north face gear

  3. #3
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,449
    Images
    2

    Default

    You'll probably see a big difference between the average AT hiker and the average PCT hiker.

    I use a Gossamer Gear pack, Henry Shires tarptent, and Marmot Helium sleeping bag, for a total of 63 oz or a little under 4 lb.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-05-2002
    Location
    Lakewood, WA
    Age
    46
    Posts
    1,885
    Images
    118

    Default

    In 2003 I hiked with a ULA Zenith (no longer made, about 16 oz), Western Mountaineering Highlite (40 deg, 19 oz), and a Dancing Lite Tacoma tarp (about 11 oz) with a Tyvek groundcloth (about 7 oz).

    I saw a lot of heavy weight (50+ lbs) on the AT and none on the PCT.

  5. #5
    Registered User A-Train's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-12-2003
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,027
    Images
    10

    Default

    In 07' on the PCT, the unofficial pack was the ULA Catalyst, bag-the Western Mountaineering Ultralight and people used a variety of Shires tarptents, mostly the Contrail, Rainbow, Virga and the Six Moons lunar solo
    Anything's within walking distance if you've got the time.
    GA-ME 03, LT 04/06, PCT 07'

  6. #6

    Default

    For my thru-hike last year I used: Gossamer Gear Mariposa / Golite Pinacle (half of the trail with each), Golite 20 degree Quilt, and Six Moon Design Wild Oasis

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,033

    Default

    On the PCT a greater % of thru-hikers have a higher level of experience than the AT. As a hiker gains more experience he or she is usually in a better place to choose lighter wt. gear and they often do. Hence, this is a major factor in hikers having a lower wt. hiking kit on the PCT than on the AT. There * some on the PCT, as on the AT, that keep the same gear set-up during their entire thru-hike, but IMO there exists a wider range of hiking conditions on the PCT than the AT and therefore the PCT lends itself better to changing out gear for different sections of the hike. For example, I personally wouldn't use the same gear set-up for a nobo start in early Apr from Campo across the Mojave Desert as I would in the Sierras or Washington. And, even in SoCal it's not always clear cut what kind of gear you should be hauling because you can be set-up for desert hiking at 1500 ft elev. and then suddenly you reach 10,000 ft elev. Mt. San Jacinto where, needless to say, the conditions can be very different. Same with going over Mt. Baden-Powell in SoCal.

    If it helps you in some way I swapped out a WM Highlight and Marmot Helium on different ocassions. Same w/ shelter. Sometimes I carried just a MLD Superlight bivy as shelter. Sometimes I carried both that bivy and a light wt Spinnaker tarp. Started w/ one set of clothing in Campo and when I got to Kennedy Meadows(KM) I switched to some warmer clothing. Again, changed clothing for Washington near the N. Cascades. Same with shoes. I didn't want to wear the same highly ventilated trailrunners that I wore across the Mojave as when I crossed the Sierra's snow and ice filled passes at 13000 + ft elev. As for hauler, I started w/ a GoLite Jam2 and switched to a ULA Conduit. But I made the pack switch not because of any trail conditions, but based on the ULA Conduit fitting my hiking style better.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chris View Post
    I saw a lot of heavy weight (50+ lbs) on the AT and none on the PCT.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    On the PCT a greater % of thru-hikers have a higher level of experience than the AT. As a hiker gains more experience he or she is usually in a better place to choose lighter wt. gear and they often do.
    . . . and there are some idiots, like me, who don't.
    I had what was probably a fifty lb. pack last year on the PCT, although I can't be sure (as I never weighed it).

    I carried the same pack and sleeping bag the whole way -- Osprey Atmos 65 and a Lafuma 950 X (850 Down). I carried a MSR Twing tarp in the desert and switched to an MSR Fling (single wall, no longer available) from Kennedy Meadows north.

    Other posters are correct regarding generally lighter pack weights on the PCT. I think much of it has to do with experience, but also the fact that there's more time pressure on the PCT. Ripping off a series of 30+ mile days is easier if you have a lighter pack, but I managed just fine with my fairly ridiculous load.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  9. #9

    Default

    It's also not necessary to do a lot of 30 mile days. We hiked the trail in 2000 with an average pace of 19 mpd - and finished September 23rd after 5 months, 5 days. We only did one really big day (29 miles).

    I also don't tend to switch out gear because it puts more of a burden on the home support, and can get expensive shipping from the east. I don't mind carrying a 20 degree bag the whole way. If it's hot, I just sleep on top.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit Walker View Post
    It's also not necessary to do a lot of 30 mile days.
    It is if you do a lot of unnecessary zero days! Like me!
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  11. #11

    Default

    Yep, those zeros will get you. We did a lot fewer zeros on the PCT, especially up north where we were going to resorts more than towns.

    My point was just aimed at those who think that you HAVE to do big miles on the PCT or CDT. You don't. Bigger than the AT, perhaps, because of the water issues -- but it doesn't have to be a death march.

  12. #12

    Default

    I did most of my zeroes in California, and as a result of that (plus the fact that I was in shape) most of my 30+ mile days in OR & WA.


    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit Walker View Post
    . . .but it doesn't have to be a death march.
    You keep telling people it's not a death march and it's gonna get all kinds of crowded out there. Don't listen to him, people! It's like Bataan out there!
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-11-2007
    Location
    Crofton, MD
    Age
    81
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    I did most of my zeroes in California, and as a result of that (plus the fact that I was in shape) most of my 30+ mile days in OR & WA.




    You keep telling people it's not a death march and it's gonna get all kinds of crowded out there. Don't listen to him, people! It's like Bataan out there!
    It's only a death march if "you" make it that way. 2663 miles/150 days = 17.75 mpd average for a 5 month hike.

    What Bataan? In which universe?

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oso loco View Post
    It's only a death march if "you" make it that way. 2663 miles/150 days = 17.75 mpd average for a 5 month hike.

    What Bataan? In which universe?
    Hmmm. Well, the Bataan Death March was only 70 miles long. On the other hand, no one shot me for wanting to take a zero day on the PCT, so there's that. So maybe not like Bataan at all. Longer but safer, and, you know, voluntary. But I'll continue to believe that there's a place for hyperbole in this world!

    What I was trying to point out was that if people post that it isn't hard . . .nevermind.

    But I will say that if I was perfectly honest with myself, I probably only averaged 12 miles per day on the AT (2162 over six months), so 17.75 mpd IS significantly more. For me. Is there no one who will feel sorry for me?
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-11-2007
    Location
    Crofton, MD
    Age
    81
    Posts
    394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    Hmmm. Well, the Bataan Death March was only 70 miles long. On the other hand, no one shot me for wanting to take a zero day on the PCT, so there's that. So maybe not like Bataan at all. Longer but safer, and, you know, voluntary. But I'll continue to believe that there's a place for hyperbole in this world!

    What I was trying to point out was that if people post that it isn't hard . . .nevermind.

    But I will say that if I was perfectly honest with myself, I probably only averaged 12 miles per day on the AT (2162 over six months), so 17.75 mpd IS significantly more. For me. Is there no one who will feel sorry for me?
    Hmmm - I didn't say it wasn't hard. Easier than the GDT - and the CDT - and maybe the AT, but still not "easy". The distance, water and occasional weather issues ensure that. And then there was the shot-up rental van just south of Silverwood Lake - so we weren't sure we weren't gonna get shot at.

    But not quite Bataan. Still - didn't mean to spoil your hyperbole. I'll try to do better next time

    Welcome to the 6-month stragglers. For me, only the PCT took less than 6 months. But then, that's because, except for the PCT, I planned for 6-month, maxiimum-time-on-trail hikes. Life is so much better when one isnt in a hurry. Gotta wonder about people who say they love the backcountry and then spend as little time as possible out there.

    But I can't feel sorry for you - after all, you got to do the distance through some beautiful country. Now - when are you gonna do the CDT? It's even better.

  16. #16

    Default

    NO one has mentioned that you need less gear on the PCT.
    It rarely rains in CA. So, you don't need much of a tarp for a shelter. You don't need bombproof raingear, you don't need a garbage bag or double bag your stuff all the time with extra socks to have a dry pair at night.
    Also, you can wash your clothes almost everyday and they dry out in hours so you are hiking cleaner. (don't smell like a sewer)

    On the harder side, you do need to carry more food out of towns, know how to ford groin deep, wide rivers, self arrest, and find our way on snow-covered trails. (some years, maybe not this coming one)
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  17. #17
    Registered User A-Train's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-12-2003
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,027
    Images
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    NO one has mentioned that you need less gear on the PCT.
    It rarely rains in CA. So, you don't need much of a tarp for a shelter. You don't need bombproof raingear, you don't need a garbage bag or double bag your stuff all the time with extra socks to have a dry pair at night.
    Also, you can wash your clothes almost everyday and they dry out in hours so you are hiking cleaner. (don't smell like a sewer)

    On the harder side, you do need to carry more food out of towns, know how to ford groin deep, wide rivers, self arrest, and find our way on snow-covered trails. (some years, maybe not this coming one)
    Not necessarily. The desert is capable of providing some serious storms and I'd like to have something more susbtantial than you mention for a shelter. I know it is the exception to the rule, and every yr a few walk to KM without ANY shelter. Most of those people don't have a plan other than to find a way into a town.

    In 06 and 07 the Lagunas got decent snow the end of April and last year there was a serious storm around Baden Powell and Wrightwood.

    Be prepared from Campo to Canada.
    Anything's within walking distance if you've got the time.
    GA-ME 03, LT 04/06, PCT 07'

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    . . .know how to ford groin deep . . .
    For a second I thought "groin deep" was the name of a body of water. "I forded Groin Deep! It was incredibly dangerous!"
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  19. #19
    Registered User kyhipo's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-19-2005
    Location
    ky
    Age
    48
    Posts
    676
    Images
    14

    Default

    I used my ferrino,kelty and my alcohol stove o and my wool sweaters.ky

  20. #20
    Registered User wtmntcaretaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-02-2007
    Location
    Three Rivers, Ca
    Posts
    163
    Images
    12

    Default

    so most of you it looks like didnt use a shelter with bug netting. (exempting the tarp tenters). do you think netting is necessary? and for those of you who didnt have a bottom to your tarps... what did you do for a dry floor?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •