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  1. #1
    Registered User NorCalGuy's Avatar
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    Question Sierra Nevada Survival Kit Questions.

    Hello there. I am planning my first true deep woods backpacking/ Bush craft trip this summer and joined this web site to do some research and to possibly meet people with common interests for future trips. I plan on going to the Sierra Nevada area in late June/ July of 2009. Here are some of my survival kit questions about the Sierra Nevada.

    1) Is there any Sierra Nevada specific gear you would suggest I bring?

    2) Is there any gear you personally recommend from your past trips/ trips in the Sierra Nevada?

    3) What is your survival kit like?


    Thanks so much ahead of time. Any help is appreciated!
    - David

  2. #2
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    NorCal --

    Not sure I understand what you mean about a "survival kit" in the Sierra Nevada. If you're talking about a backpacking trip, about the only item different there than for some other areas is a bearproof container for food/toiletries/cooking gear. If you're talking about something else, help me out on what your plans are.

    Weasy
    "Thank God! there is always a Land of Beyond, For us who are true to the trail..." --- Robert Service

  3. #3
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    I've done several trips to Yosemite & the Wind River Range. I'd say that your first consideration is going to be the extreme temperature range compared to the AT. You can easily go from daytime highs in the 80's to overnight lows in the teens in a single day. That will certainly need to be addressed in your clothing & shelter choices.

    Check out Koip Peak on the north eastern edge of Yosemite if you want to lose the crowds. I don't know if you can still call it bushcraft if the terrain won't even support bushes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalGuy View Post
    my first true deep woods backpacking/ Bush craft trip this summer and joined this web site to do some research.

    Any help is appreciated!
    NorCalGuy, this website has encylopedic information about hiking the Appalachian Trail, which has road crossings throughout at 10-20 miles intervals, with a few exceptions.

    It is not "deep" woods backpacking, nor "bushcraft." In fact, bushcraft is actively discouraged along the AT corridor, as it is highly traveled, and within the a 4-hour drive of 60% of the US population in the East.

    That said, I hope you can learn a lot here, and that you have a fantastic trip.

    Check out these sites, as they have a lot of cool bushcraft information that may be more applicable if you truly want to go the bushcraft route:

    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/

    http://www.survivalbushcraft.com/sbf/

    http://www.bushcraft.ridgeonnet.com/

    http://apathways.com/
    I walk the line.

  5. #5
    Registered User NorCalGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BR360 View Post
    NorCalGuy, this website has encylopedic information about hiking the Appalachian Trail, which has road crossings throughout at 10-20 miles intervals, with a few exceptions.

    It is not "deep" woods backpacking, nor "bushcraft." In fact, bushcraft is actively discouraged along the AT corridor, as it is highly traveled, and within the a 4-hour drive of 60% of the US population in the East.

    That said, I hope you can learn a lot here, and that you have a fantastic trip.

    Check out these sites, as they have a lot of cool bushcraft information that may be more applicable if you truly want to go the bushcraft route:

    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/

    http://www.survivalbushcraft.com/sbf/

    http://www.bushcraft.ridgeonnet.com/

    http://apathways.com/
    Cool thanks, I will check them out!
    - David

  6. #6
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    Be aware that in the National Parks up there a bear canister is required. Outside the parks, if you don't hike with a canister, learn to hang your food and bring cord for that (50' of paracord or similar). The critters aren't dangerous, but keep them out of your food. Summer in the Sierra is pretty nice weather, but be prepared for afternoon thunderstorms, which can be very violent, and especially dangerous above treeline. Stick to an itinerary which you've given to two different people--one you love, and one you trust. Acclimate slowly to the altitude, especially above 10,000'. Drink plenty of that great Sierra water. Otherwise, basic backpacking gear and the "10 essentials" and some common sense will keep you out of trouble. You probably won't be totally alone up there, so ask for help if you need it.

    A dry 20 degree bag will keep you warm no matter what, but you can probably survive with a 30. You won't need much extra clothing that time of year, as long as you keep dry. Be prepared for mosquitoes.

    Happy hiking. That's beautiful country, enjoy it.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  7. #7
    Registered User boarstone's Avatar
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    Don't cook your meals in the same area your going to be camping/sleeping....cuts down on the bear encounters in camp. Don't sleep in clothes you've cooked in either. So that being said, cook, eat, move to night camp. Take off clothes you cooked in, hang w/bear bag, put on fresh sleepwear, in the a.m., remove fresh, put back on old clothes from tree where they were hung the night before.
    Do one thing everyday...that makes you happy...

  8. #8
    Registered User oops56's Avatar
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    Now if you are hiking you got ever thing in you pack why would you need a survival kit. The only way i would have a survival kit would be in a fannie pack just in cast the pack fell off down cliff or lost in a stream not can get it then you have the fannie pack on you

  9. #9

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    Things you need: Sleeping bag, tarp or tent, bear bag, permit, rain or at least wind shell top,( preferably jacket), food, container to hold water, long underwear (polypro or equivalent), shoes, socks, hat, possibly sunglasses or sunscreen, map, toothbrush and paste, dental floss and needle for sewing, razor blade or knife.
    Oh yeah, and something to carry it all in.

    If you are cooking, add a stove, fuel, pot and spoon.
    if you are going in July, headnet (bug net)

    That's what i take (plus a guitar) Many take more, some less.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  10. #10
    Registered User NorCalGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boarstone View Post
    Don't cook your meals in the same area your going to be camping/sleeping....cuts down on the bear encounters in camp. Don't sleep in clothes you've cooked in either. So that being said, cook, eat, move to night camp. Take off clothes you cooked in, hang w/bear bag, put on fresh sleepwear, in the a.m., remove fresh, put back on old clothes from tree where they were hung the night before.
    Seems like a lot of work, does anyone else do this on the norm? Or is it just to be extra safe?
    - David

  11. #11

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    I don't do that. I don't have more than one set of clothes anyway.
    But i do try to sleep where other people don't.

    i don't camp in established campgsites unless i have to and then they have bear boxes.
    I like to camp above treeline. The bear's don't go up there. They know where the easy food is: (they go to those guys that cook in different clothes)
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

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    The clothing thing isn't necessary and I don't know of anyone who actually does it. I'm only carrying the clothes I'm wearing, except for a set of thermals and rain gear.

    On a long hike it is easy to not cook where you sleep: Eat dinner in the late afternoon for added calories, then hike on. At night, snack on cookies or brownies or bourbon. Like fiddlehead, I try not to camp in established sites where lots of others have before, except when they are stunningly beautiful, of course.

  13. #13
    Registered User NorCalGuy's Avatar
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    I read a lil on bear canisters and it suggests your cooking area, camping area and bear canister all be 50ft away from eachother in the form of a triangle during the night. i guess that aint so bad, but im gonna want a fire close by
    - David

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    Registered User handlebar's Avatar
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    Default No fires above treeline

    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalGuy View Post
    ... but im gonna want a fire close by
    No fires are permitted above treeline, but that's the best place to camp for bear avoidance. Also you might cut down a bit on the mosquitos (at least it was that way in June08). A great section to hike is Tuoloumne Meadows to Sonora Pass on the PCT (about 4 days at 20 mi per day), but much of it's in Yosemite and you'll have to hitch a ride to whichever end you leave your car. I'm not sure, but I think you can catch public transport from Bridgeport back to Tuolumne via YARTS. I'd leave the firearm at home and enjoy that section (assuming CA's not on fire again this year).
    Handlebar
    GA-ME 06; PCT 08; CDT 10,11,12; ALT 11; MSPA 12; CT 13; Sheltowee 14; AZT 14, 15; LT 15;FT 16;NCT-NY&PA 16; GET 17-18

  15. #15

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    a lot of what you need depends on where you are going. That time of year, thunderstorms can come up out of no where. Also, in some areas it may be the start of bow season for deer. so be careful. The sierras are beautiful, I've done a little travelin from hwy 50 south to hwy 4. mostly hiking, camping, hunting and fishing. If you are interested, there is a section of the coast to crest trail up by salt springs res. that might be good to look into. As far as bear cannisters are concerned, I was under the impression that they are required in the wilderness areas, just something you might want to check into. to my world

  16. #16

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    As far as my personal gear, I always carry a light rain coat. a poncho would work also. make sure you have something warm to put on if it gets chilly out. could definatley happen if you are up high. I carry water with me, but I also drink directly from fast moving rapids( has a tendancy to gross people out). I wouldn't advise it unless you are used to that sort of thing. I did it in yosemite one time when really thirsty, and my cousin, after seeing I did't drop dead immediatly followed suit. Long story short, we had to stop on our way back to merced for immodium for HIM. I also drink directly from springs when I am up real high, water just tastes great. the bears aren't as much of a problem as people make it out to be, just use your head, don't keep food in you tent/shelter( mine is now a hammock), and they will pretty much leave you alone. they can smell you long before you can see them, and if not in a park, they will avoid you when ever posible due to being hunted.sleeping bag depends on what type of sleeper you are. 20 to 30 degree bag should be just fine. I use a coleman 20 degree bag snow camping and stay nice and warm. the most important thing you can bring is also the hardest to find, COMMON SENSE. remember you are going into an area where cell service is spotty at best, and the possibilty of seeing people may vary greatly upon your choice of locations. Don't become a news story about another dumb a** that went up into the sierras in shorts and tennis shoes, and wasn't heard from again.

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