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  1. #1
    Registered User Engine's Avatar
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    Default Great old tree photos.

    Recently there was a thread about the demise of a famous tree on the AT, and I mentioned I would try to get a photo of a large Tulip Poplar I had heard about on the Hanna Mountain trail. Here is a pic of the old guy with my favorite gal (Caboose) for a size comparison. I would love to see some of the photos of grand old giants that some of you have as well.

    http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/show...i=33504&c=555]
    Last edited by Engine; 05-11-2009 at 21:02. Reason: no photo...
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  2. #2

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    My favorite trail for big trees is Ramsey Cascades in the Smokies. It's out of the Greenbrier area. There are some monsters on that trail.
    Cabin Fever
    You need God—to hope, to care, to love, to live.

  3. #3
    Registered User Engine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabin Fever View Post
    My favorite trail for big trees is Ramsey Cascades in the Smokies. It's out of the Greenbrier area. There are some monsters on that trail.
    I remember reading about that stretch of trail in Backpacker quite a few years ago. They said it was one of the largest stands of old growth left in the east if I recall. I haven't had the pleasure of seeing it yet, but do try the Hannah Mountain trail. There are about 2 dozen old guys that aren't much smaller than the one in the picture.
    Last edited by Engine; 05-11-2009 at 21:12. Reason: sp
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  4. #4
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
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    The Sequoias in CA are amazing. I never saw anything like it.







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    "the big tree" in Sipsey Wilderness in Alabama



    Big Poplars in GSMNP (near CS#41)




    Waslick Poplar off the AT in North Carolina


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    Registered User Reid's Avatar
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    Great thread!! I'll have to find my pics though. I've got a 700 yr old loblolly right down the road.

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    Registered User Reid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blissful View Post
    The Sequoias in CA are amazing. I never saw anything like it.
    Can't wait to get out there too!

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    Registered User Reid's Avatar
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    I believe there are only about 10 old growth forests left in America. Two of which I've been too which is Joyce Kilmer and Congaree. Congaree is a very old forest and you can only really access by kayak/canoe.

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    http://www.nativetreesociety.org/big...s_by_state.htm
    The AT in Mass. goes over Mt. Race and Mt. Everett which have about 40 acres of old growth trees. They are not so impressive because they are stunted by the harsh climate, but they managed to avoid centuries of logging.

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    Default Eastern Old Growth.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    I believe there are only about 10 old growth forests left in America. Two of which I've been too which is Joyce Kilmer and Congaree. Congaree is a very old forest and you can only really access by kayak/canoe.
    The Five Ponds Wilderness in the Adirondacks has 50,000 acres of old growth forest.
    The West Canada Lake Wilderness in the Adirondacks has at least 6000 acres.

    The Adirondacks are awesome. I've got to explore the Five Ponds Wilderness. That's a trip that will be a blood sacrifice to black flies and mosquitos.

    Even Mt. Wachusett, 40 miles west of Boston has 200 acres of old growth.

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    Aparently they have found some really old trees in Fundy National Park. They are the ones that were stunted, and in less accessible places, so nobidy bothered to cut them. There is a Red Spruce which is supposed to be the World's oldest at 445 years, but I think people in other regions just haven't looked as hard yet maybe. Not sure.

  12. #12

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    Old growth* south of the AT near Monson, Maine:
    http://tinyurl.com/pswfxs


    *due to pro-lumber Maine politics, this 200 acre forest of 200-300 year old trees doesn't qualify for status as 'old growth'.
    Teej

    "[ATers] represent three percent of our use and about twenty percent of our effort," retired Baxter Park Director Jensen Bissell.

  13. #13
    Registered User Reid's Avatar
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    I know we've joked in the past about the earth first groups and the other far out tree huggers but I do share some of their concerns, and I think everyone does to some degree. I love reading history books about the people who settled the area I live in and how the original forest's were. I couldn't explain it all but if you ever get a chance to read up on the early settler's you should do it. I called my local university and got some leads on the best books on the matter.

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    Thank you for the pics. Tulip poplars have a history in New England, plus I like big tree pics.

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    Registered User Engine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    I believe there are only about 10 old growth forests left in America. Two of which I've been too which is Joyce Kilmer and Congaree. Congaree is a very old forest and you can only really access by kayak/canoe.
    I had some photos of some really big old guys in Joyce Kilmer, but the hard drive on the old computer crashed and they are lost until I can get back up there...
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  16. #16

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    Just trying something to see if it works


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    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
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    I took loads of tree photos on my hike. None of the photos convey the experience of being in the presence of a Giant. Here's one picture:

    http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=199078
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  18. #18

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    Rare American chestnut tree discovered in Sandusky marsh.
    “Only two things are infinite; The universe and human stupidity,
    And I’m starting to wonder about the universe.”
    Albert Einstein

  19. #19

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    Having finally spent months on the west coast (tacoma/st fran and everywhere in between) the trees absolutely blew my mind. I was lucky to be able to see most of the west coast state parks (SD, MT, ID, WA, OR, CA, NV, NM) and was MOST impressed and awed by the trees. I was completely facinated and spent hours in amazement of these behemoths that (i humbly offer) have no east coast comparison. My wife really thought I was nuts, until she also had a chance to stand in the old growth redwoods and experience them for herself.
    this was the result: http://picasaweb.google.com/dneilson...93437961185810
    pardon the lighting, it was dusk in Humbolt...

    I really took to having a new appreciation for people that fight for and preserver wilderness areas, I'd love to go back to school for a forestry related degree. I also gained a lot of respect for the harvesting/management in WA.

    Of all the sights and sounds, I miss the trees the most....
    feel free to look around at my pics - there are too many to post here; they are interspersed amongst the various areas we visited (eg: Grizzly Giant will be under Yosemite etc).

  20. #20

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    Can't beat those trees out west. Got to experience them a few times and can't wait to go back. Something unreal about Sequoia National Park.

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