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  1. #1
    Registered User joshua5878's Avatar
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    Default ALternative to Crocs for Camp Shoes??

    I am a newbie, going NOBO in March.

    Just weighed my crocs on my digital postal scale. 6.4 ozs. EACH!

    Is there an alternative to these and are camp shoes needed in your opinions?

    Thanks Josh

  2. #2
    Section Hiking Knucklehead Hooch's Avatar
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    Dollar store flip-flops.
    "If you play a Nicleback song backwards, you'll hear messages from the devil. Even worse, if you play it forward, you'll hear Nickleback." - Dave Grohl

  3. #3
    Registered User KG4FAM's Avatar
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    I have a pair of old Nike flip flops.

  4. #4
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    Instead of flip-flops, get the slip-on sandal type to make it easier to wear with socks. The pair I picked up weighed 7 ounces in total. The downside is that you really couldn't walk any distance in them, whereas with Crocs you could hike in them in a pinch and the ones with the straps will stay on your feet when you're forced to ford a river. It's a PITA to fit the Crocs in your main bag, however.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  5. #5
    Registered User DavidNH's Avatar
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    Default here's the problem with crocs

    As I see it, Crocs aren't the panecea they are sometimes made out to be. The strap as often broken off for me and when that happens, they become no better than those strapless sandles.

    Crocs are great for walking around camp. No way would I want to hike in them, even on easy terrain.

    David

  6. #6

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    I wear road running shoes for backpacking. They are very comfortable and easy to put on and take off, so I've never found a need for camp shoes. Just something else to consider.
    Stumpknocker
    Appalachian Trail is 27.0% complete.

  7. #7
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    No camp shoes. I really dont think you will need them. More trash to carry when they break or you lose one. Plus I dont think you will use them as much as you think I didnt.

  8. #8
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    I bought the biggest and the meanest Mountain Crocs for work and it was heavy for camp shoes. The newer Crocs are heavier probably due to court orders to keep escalators chewing them up. I don't like the idea of leaving my main hiking boots on the ground. Dogs or animals might carry them off, but theres barefoot hiking.

  9. #9
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Someone here posted an idea of making sandals out of an old CCF pad & rubber tubes & hit the best UL weight imaginable.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  10. #10

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    It's great that you're repulsed by the thought of 12 oz. campshoes! You're on your way to a great (and comfortable) thru-hike.

    But on to your question ... You'll only wear campshoes in camp two hours a day. You'll have to carry them 10 hours a day. Not worth the trade-off in my book!

  11. #11
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BookBurner View Post
    It's great that you're repulsed by the thought of 12 oz. campshoes! You're on your way to a great (and comfortable) thru-hike.

    But on to your question ... You'll only wear campshoes in camp two hours a day. You'll have to carry them 10 hours a day. Not worth the trade-off in my book!

    Huh? How much does your boots weigh?


    See Link http://www.zappos.com/n/es/d/722000023/page/1.html I have hiked 15 + miles in the Keen's with excellent results.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hooch View Post
    Dollar store flip-flops.
    Or a homemade version made from lightweight running shoe insoles.

  13. #13
    Registered User bigmac_in's Avatar
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    Wear trail runners and just untie them in camp. Nice and comfy.
    It's a great day to be alive !

  14. #14
    Registered User Retro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Old Owl View Post
    Someone here posted an idea of making sandals out of an old CCF pad & rubber tubes & hit the best UL weight imaginable.
    I saw a COMFY pair on the BPL forum made out of a chunk of a blue Walmart pad and a bit of duct tape. And at 1.4 oz, who can go wrong?

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...e_pagination=1

  15. #15
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    Using camp shoes is not so much for comfort since I wear very lightweight shoes to hike in. It's when I pull into camp during the rain and my hiking shoes are like sponges...this is where I really appreciate a pair of flip flops or cheap/light dollar store sandals to change into.

  16. #16
    Registered User joshua5878's Avatar
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    Default Go without..

    Quote Originally Posted by BookBurner View Post
    It's great that you're repulsed by the thought of 12 oz. campshoes! You're on your way to a great (and comfortable) thru-hike.

    But on to your question ... You'll only wear campshoes in camp two hours a day. You'll have to carry them 10 hours a day. Not worth the trade-off in my book!
    That makes a lot of sense, I think I will start w/o them. I am hiking in trail runners (Merrell Moab Ventilators) and will have them very well broken in to start.

  17. #17

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    No camp shoes for me. If my feet are wet, I slip into some clean socks after wiping out my trail runners (or sandals). For those using heavier leather boots, I'd recommend what I used to bring (along with some other posters above), old, tired street running shoes.
    For a lighter alternative you might look at indoor track shoes. They're about the lightest thing that won't come off your foot in the muck.
    Crocks don't tend to stay on your feet in difficult situations, and they float, so crossing a stream in them, if they come off, can be a "bye,bye" situation.
    Another thing that works on many levels is a very thin (2mm or so) pair of neoprene socks. Warm when wet, and dry pretty quickly. You can get zip up boots which might be good for camp shoes.
    Really, I try not to take off my wet shoes until it's time for bed, anyway. Dry socks to bed, coupled with wiped out trail runners usually work for the time or two I have to get up in the middle of the night.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  18. #18
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    As others said, if you wear light footwear, you may find you do not need camp shoes. If you hike in light footwear, you will not need special shoes for the rare stream ford (on the AT).

    If you do want camp shoes, here is the link others talked about:
    http://www.trailquest.net/sandals.html


    Most people get rid of the factory insoles anyway, so it makes good use of something you were going to throwout anyway. At one oz and pretty much free, it is not a bad way to go.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro View Post
    I saw a COMFY pair on the BPL forum made out of a chunk of a blue Walmart pad and a bit of duct tape. And at 1.4 oz, who can go wrong?

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...e_pagination=1
    Now THAT is brilliant.

  20. #20

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    [quote=Wise Old Owl;746064]Huh? How much does your boots weigh?


    25 ozs. for the pair. I use them 11 hours a day, every day of the trip. Given the benefits over going barefoot, I consider them well worth the weight.

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