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  1. #1

    Default Best Baby Jogger/Stroller for Hiking?

    I am expecting a baby in December and am doing research now for a baby stroller/jogger that I can use for hiking. We won't begin hiking with the baby until spring or early summer, and I want something that will double as stroller for running (but probably not trail running).

    Any suggestions? I have narrowed my search down to the BOB Sport Utility Stroller, with the BOB Revolution and BOB Ironman coming in second.

    As for the hiking, we probably won't be doing any overnighters with the baby for a while. For the first year at least, hikes will be limited to day hikes, mostly in the western NC and north GA mountains. I do want to find something that will be comfortable for the baby and not too much of a hassle for the parents.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    As a new grandma, I'd be interested in suggestions, too. From my experience as a mom, though, I'd think front pack (for under six months) or backpack. I found those indispensable, and not only for walking on trails.

  3. #3

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    My wife had us buy a BOB Revolution last month. Though the price tag is high, so is the resale value in our neck of the woods. We have lots of old brick sidewalks here in WDC and the BOB eats them up. It's a smooth ride for our 6mo old. We've not taken it off road at this time, but imagine it would be difficult for any type of incline or uneven rootsy, rocky surfaces. It is large and awkward.

    We use an Ergo Baby for our off-road adventures and seems to work fine. I'd definitely try before you buy if at all possible.

  4. #4

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    Forgot to mention: We're definitely getting a Kelty backpack for hiking also, but are looking for a baby jogger alternative as well.

    I will check out the Ergo Baby. Thanks!

  5. #5
    Registered User gravityman's Avatar
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    If you run a lot, go for the Bob Ironman. We have it and love it. Look at the Sherpani Rumba Ultralight or regular Rumba (if you want more room to do an overnight).

    My feeling when I looked at them was that the 'off-pavement' BOBs wouldn't do anything very well. I stuck with the nice straight tracking of the Ironman (critical when running) .

  6. #6
    Registered User Jayboflavin04's Avatar
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    My x wife would say you are outta your mind.....Taking a kid into the woods is too dangerous....Much less a baby.....you must be completely nuts! Better up the meds!

    Sorry I am so salty right now. My x wife thinks I am crazy for taking my 8 year old backpacking.
    Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.-John Muir

  7. #7
    Section Hiking Knucklehead Hooch's Avatar
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    Congrats Waterfall and Sheltowee! Gonna be @ Standing Indian camping Sunday night with Doc and Dancer. Y'all stop by and say Hi!
    "If you play a Nicleback song backwards, you'll hear messages from the devil. Even worse, if you play it forward, you'll hear Nickleback." - Dave Grohl

  8. #8

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    All: Thanks for the feedback. Feel free to keep the suggestions coming!

    Hooch: Unfortunately we won't be anywhere near Standing Indian tonight. Hope you have a great time!

  9. #9

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    This is what I was told with my son: 6 months old and ability to hold head up. No hard core stuff till he was 1 year old.

    If your stroller does NOT have a tether to put around your wrist, sew one. DO NOT use it without one!!!! If you trip the stroller can go out of control. With the tether on, the stroller stops.

    Test it out first, before you buy. It has to fit your height, so that you are not stooped over.

    Tires: 16" at least. These will clear better. Always carry a couple spares and a small pump.

    Get as light a frame as you can. It makes a huge difference.

    Insulation for baby/toddler? Take or make a fleece blanket that you cut and finish holes for the safety strap system. Line the seat with the fleece. Don't be cheap - buy name brand Polartec Windblock (you can always buy a blanket and cut to size, finish on a machine with a zig zag stitch.) Always have another blanket for covering them up. And mittens! And hat!

    Don't make the kid wear shoes, make them fleece booties to wear.

    If the stroller doesn't come up with a good stashing area, create one. You will apreciate it. Make it water proof.

    My son road in a UL aluminum jogger from 6 months till he was about 4. Even later on I used the jogger for trips for when we had say 10 miles of road walking, then hiking. He would ride inside, with packs hanging off. Stash in woods, go hike, then reverse. It allowd us between 4 and 5 to do really long days.

    Mostly I used the jogger for off season hiking in local trail systems that were bike friendly.

    PS: In steep it is often easier to drag the stroller behind you than pushing. Trust me on that - and further reason why a tether system/good safety strap system is SO important.
    Trail Cooking/FBC, Recipes, Gear and Beyond:
    Trail Cooking

  10. #10

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    Also, a rigid front wheel works better than one with a flexible wheel (that moves side to side).
    The front wheel should also be the same size as the back ones.
    Metal spokes are desirable, plastic NO. They can and will break.

    Most of all, before you go coughing up hundreds of dollars, look here:
    http://www.instep.net/Product/Fixed-Wheel_Joggers/

    They make decent joggers that work well. And cost a LOT less. You can often find them at Wal-Mart, Target, baby shops, etc. They REALLY work.
    Trail Cooking/FBC, Recipes, Gear and Beyond:
    Trail Cooking

  11. #11
    Mom of Future Thru-Hiker docllamacoy's Avatar
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    When baby is a newborn, babywearing is a great way to get off the beaten path and keep baby warm. I had a Moby Wrap and then moved on to a mei tai and an Ergo. I didn't use the hard backpack until my son was 15 months. I was able to walk trails with my son through a Massachusetts winter by using a carrier and a babywearing coat. He stayed toasty up against my body just fine. If you go that route, you won't have to wait until spring to hit the trail.
    Jogging strollers are great for running, but they aren't great on hiking trails. They tend to be pretty heavy and bumpy for baby. I have a Jeep jogger just for running; I wouldn't recommend it. It seems that the BOB is the lightest around, and everyone I've talked to seems to love them.
    Llama, of Doc, Llama & Coy

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by docllamacoy View Post
    Jogging strollers are great for running, but they aren't great on hiking trails. They tend to be pretty heavy and bumpy for baby. I have a Jeep jogger just for running; I wouldn't recommend it. It seems that the BOB is the lightest around, and everyone I've talked to seems to love them.
    For older babies (say 6 months and older and then especially into toddler years) those with rear shocks work well. It really depends on the trail though and how fast you go. I kept my hiking at 2 mph or less on trails - and I only went on bike friendly trails (since a jogger is a bike in essence!). True hiking trails are a no-no if hiker only.
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  13. #13

    Default Best double stroller options

    Just hanging around and searching for a stroller for my coming new birth. And we are extremely exciting because we were told that my wife had twin babies. We are busying now double our preparation, including clothes, toys, travel gear, etc. So is it a good idea to get a double stroller instead of an ordinary one?

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkPrince View Post
    Just hanging around and searching for a stroller for my coming new birth. And we are extremely exciting because we were told that my wife had twin babies. We are busying now double our preparation, including clothes, toys, travel gear, etc. So is it a good idea to get a double stroller instead of an ordinary one?
    If you can afford it, I'd seriously consider buying a single and double. There will definitely be times when you don't need to haul both kids around at the same time and a double stroller would be an odd fit for those situations. Also don't be afraid to look at used Bob strollers. I think we paid $75 for ours. I'm not sure what year it is, but definitely has some miles on it. I've run quite a bit with it and have noticed virtually nothing that was the worse for wear. Also, once we started using it, we almost immediately quit using our other traditional stroller because the Bob works so much better in nearly all environments. I'd have to dig through some notes and order history, but there's an adapter you can get that will allow most of the infant car seats to go into it.

  15. #15

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    Having several of my own I am not anti baby.
    But a wheel stroller or such will conflict with Wilderness requirements and is also basically prohibited on the AT. There are no exclusions for age.

    I think you'll find that carrying your baby would actually be easier then Wheeling it over extremely rough ground and Rocky stair steps anyway. There's a reason that's what everybody else does. Or perhaps you've never been on a hiking trail?

    From my experience with baby consumer items...... You can forget about them being durable enough to hold up to off-road use anyway. They're not made for that and sureley will break very quickly even if it was legal for you to use, and you managed to use it. Babies ride would also be extremely rough and it would be tossed around. That is unless your version of hiking is a groomed walking path at a local park.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 04-27-2018 at 10:22.

  16. #16
    Registered User gravityman's Avatar
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    Pay up front for the Chariot. I say double, unless you are 100% sure you aren't going to have a 2nd.

    You won't use it on anything more extreme than fine crusher trails.

    You can use it for biking and ski attachment if you are in to cross country.

    We got a bob, then a Burley, and finally the chariot. Should have just gotten the chariot. Rei 20% off coupon is the way to go. Finally sold the chariot this year with a 8 and 11 year old. The 8 year old stopped riding in it 2 years ago.

    Tom

  17. #17
    Registered User gravityman's Avatar
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    PS I agree that you need a baby backpack for actual hiking. Early on (first 6 months) we used front carriers (Moby wrap then Ergo). These are great for getting through the Caulic stages to take them for a stroll before bed. When they can hold their head up (8 months) we moved them to the backpack (Deuter seems real popular, at the time Sherpani made a great one we loved).

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