WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: heavy daypack

  1. #21
    Registered User Yukon's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-25-2007
    Location
    Cambridge, New York
    Age
    43
    Posts
    1,224
    Images
    21

    Default

    I didn't want to say anything either, but 6.5 pounds seems pretty darned good to me...

  2. #22
    Yellow Jacket
    Join Date
    02-13-2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,929
    Images
    11

    Default

    I don't care so much about weight on day hikes. In fact, they tend to be "heavy" and "over stocked". Unless you plan on doing a 20-30 mile day hike, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Yellow Jacket -- Words of Wisdom (tm) go here.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Age
    50
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Yeah, 6.5 pounds is pretty reasonable. If it feels heavy for you, then go ahead and make a few changes, as others have given really, really good tips.

    First thing I can think of, you don't need an entire First Aid kit, look into the suggestions mentioned. Second, do you need to carry that entire book? How much does the book weigh? If you can, just photocopy (or tear out) the pages you need and take those. You don't need 6 oz. of Repel for a day hike, get an eyedropper bottle and put some in.

    I strongly suggest taking the compass.

  4. #24
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    5,490
    Images
    2

    Default

    Not all day hikes are created equal. And your pack should reflect what you're afraid of. It sounds like you're taking decent walks in the Smokies, so you do want to cover some contingencies with weather. But there's a huge difference between, say, a 21-mile traverse of the Wildcats in stormy weather with your kids, and a half-day solo jaunt in a county park on a sunny afternoon. Pack accordingly.

    The more I hike, the less I carry, as I get more comfortable with my ability to solve problems and stay out of trouble. Sure, a day hike CAN turn into a survival adventure, but really, how often does that happen to an experienced hiker? I've never used any survival equipment on a day hike, ever. Mostly, my day pack is now lunch and a rain jacket. Sometimes I'll even start out with an empty water bottle, if I can count on springs or snowmelt along the way. If I'm in familiar territory in known weather conditions, I might leave a few of the 10 essentials at home (gasp!).

    I never get headaches or sore joints or diarrhea and have no allergies, so why pills? I have a cotton bandanna in my pocket and never get blisters, so why bandaids? I often hike in areas I've been exploring for a decade or more and know every trail and junction, so a map and compass are dead weight. If I can't keep my feet dry because of snow melt, why carry drinking water? Drinking untreated water IMO does not constitute an emergency, so I won't carry water treatment. If I'm staying on known trail and clear skies are forecast for the week, why carry extra clothing. If I've taken literally hundreds of photos of the area already why bring a camera? I have nothing that needs to be fixed, so why carry a multitool?

    I really enjoy my day hikes when I carry next to nothing. I might pay the price someday when I slip and fall and fracture my femur, or need to cut off my arm at the elbow, but I might win the lottery someday, too.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-26-2007
    Location
    maine
    Age
    60
    Posts
    4,964
    Images
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mauby View Post
    . You don't need 6 oz. of Repel for a day hike,

    .
    6oz of bug spray is best left in the garage. Even in Maine.

    Think water. One quart = 2 pounds.

  6. #26
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    59
    Posts
    7,925
    Images
    296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post

    I never get headaches or sore joints or diarrhea and have no allergies, so why pills? I have a cotton bandanna in my pocket and never get blisters, so why bandaids? I often hike in areas I've been exploring for a decade or more and know every trail and junction, so a map and compass are dead weight.
    All of this is correct. However, many times I have used my first aid kit, blister pads, map, multitool, etc., to help another hiker who has blisters, is lost, broke something, whatever. I don't mind carrying those things on a dayhike.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  7. #27

    Default

    If you do it right, you can put your 10 essentials in a single quart size ziploc. I do this for when I trael and want to hike. Hate to leave the knife out, but oh well.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-29-2006
    Location
    Bloomington, IN
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,018

    Default

    I never really thought about what I bring on a day hike / slack pack because the weight is not an issue. If the weather forces me to bring additional clothing I use my Go Lite pack and if not I use a 3 liter camelback. Replenishing water isn't an issue so I don't need a filter.

    Regardless of the pack I'm also taking the following for a typical 15 - 20 mile day:

    Food. Meal replacement bar, trail mix, and something like a snickers is plenty.
    Camera and map but that's normally in my pocket and not in the pack
    Cell phone and car keys
    Extra socks
    Wipes in a ziplock bag and a small amount of TP. I rarely take a dump on the trail.

    If I bring the Go Lite I have 2.5 liters of water in nalgene bottles and I'll add a rain jacket, sweatshirt, etc.

    With 3 liters of water I probably start with up to 10 pounds.
    Pain is a by-product of a good time.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-22-2009
    Location
    Somerset, KY
    Age
    39
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I scored a nice Kelty Wasatchi daypack on e-bay for 30 bucks plus s+h. I love it and I have been loading it down with everything and even things I know I won't use. It's good for the excersice I think plus if I ever feel the need I can go slacklining or play frisbee by myself (if I'm alone and with some practice).

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2005
    Location
    Salisbury, NC
    Age
    67
    Posts
    147

    Default

    Day hiking is one thing I have done a lot of. For me, I always carry:

    Water- 1.5L hydro and (2) .5L bottles. If I'm unsure of good water availbility, I'll carry my Pur Sweetwater.
    Food- snack bars at a minimum, other goodies at my discretion. I'm usually on a loop trail, so I drive to my meal before the next trail.
    Rainwear
    Pack towel
    Knife
    Whistle (this is flirting with disaster, no matter how experienced you are. And, really, what does it weigh?)
    Moleskin
    Warm clothes depends on the time of year.

    Any other items are purely discretionary. My pack is rarely near 10 lbs.

  11. #31
    Nalgene Ninja flemdawg1's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-31-2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Age
    49
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    I normally take my wife and 3 small kids dayhiking w/ me. With snacks, lunch, everyone's jacket, and lots of water + 10 essentials, I'm up to 20lbs easily.

    I go on solo 40 mile weekend BPing trips for the rest.

    Solo dayhike list:
    rain jacket
    1st aid kit (2 bandaids, 2 guaze pads, small amount of tape, 2 alcky wipe, neosporin, ibu, immodium, sinus tabs)
    headlamp
    steripen
    water bladder
    4-in-1 survival whistle (compass, mirror, wp matches, )
    map
    nav compass
    multitool/knife
    bic lighter
    fire starter (vaseline soaked cotton balls)
    fleece jacket and hat (if not summer and in mountains)
    snack

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-08-2009
    Location
    Greeneville, TN
    Age
    64
    Posts
    183
    Images
    8

    Default

    How can you complain about 6.5 lbs?? That is nothing! I am a 52 yo woman who weighs 110 lbs, and I tell you I wouldnt even be able to tell that I had that little weight on my back. Maybe put more stuff in your pockets if that much weight bothers you!

  13. #33
    The trail is childhood reborn. Simple, carefree, and full of Wonders Captn's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-30-2005
    Location
    New Braunfels, Texas
    Age
    59
    Posts
    443
    Images
    21

    Default

    I carry at these things every time I go anywhere near a trail, at a minimum, and in warm weather.

    1.) A good, if small, knife.

    2.) At least two ways to make a fire.

    3.) A water filter bottle.

    4.) A Photon keychain flashlight.

    5.) A rain jacket with a hood.

    The other stuff you have in your pack are really nice to have if you have an emergency and I would encourage you to keep carrying all of it, including a headlamp. Don't forget some iodine tablets and a map if necessary.

    The most important thing you're missing: Leaving an itinerary with when and where your going with someone you trust.

    I won't even hike trails near town without the above list AS A MINIMUM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •