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  1. #1
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    Default You're doing it wrong but don't care

    You're wearing jeans, tennis shoes, and got the family tent on your back. You have cans of soup and plan on starting a campfire. Any ultra-heavy campers out there? This is not me but my gear is old and wonder what others think.

  2. #2
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    I think that folks need to decide for themselves what they want to carry, and at the end of the day, it's nobody else's business.

    People spend altogether too much time speculating and commenting on what other folks are doing out there and what their pack weighs. Most of these comments are snarky and gossipy. People should carry what they like, and they should like what they carry, and they have no obligation to explain or rationalize this to anyone.

  3. #3
    Registered User lazy river road's Avatar
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    Im a total newb....Before I decided to E2E...I loaded up my non-framed pack, my marmot aura 3p, wisperlight international, lafuma 40, some soup, other random cans of food, one change of cloths and a couple other essentials Id need on a extended hike...I went for a 4 hr hike and was miserable.....it was then i decided that proper gear was a must if seriously considering a long distance hike.....I have started investing in lighter gear and a much better pack...IDK if this answers your question but lighter is def better.....
    Half of the people can be part right all of the time,Some of the people can be all right part of the time. But all the people can't be all right all the time

  4. #4
    formerly amazonwoman
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    Gear is for your comfort and safety. Just as some people go irresponsibly ultralight (don't carry a tent and then throw a fit when there is no room in a shelter), some go irresponsibly heavy. Inproper clothing can indanger your life. Often it rains for days on end and a campfire is impossible. If you are carrying a very heavy pack it may be tempting to leave those soup cans behind instead of packing them out. I've heard stories of the trail in Georgia being littered with lanterns, jars of peanut butter and other stupidly heavy gear because the owner didn't realize what a 70 lb pack would feel like going up hill.

    I've also heard people say the carry a camp stool and lots of other extras that are heavy and don't mind the weight because of the comfort level. Some people thru with a 2 man tent for the extra room.

    Hike your own hike and carry what you want, but be responsible. Make sure your clothing and gear are adequate to keep you warm and safe. Practice Leave No Trace and don't rely on other hikers to fill in the gaps.
    Dancer (Julie)
    "What saves a man (woman) is to take a step. Then another step." ---Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5
    Registered User nox's Avatar
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    I went out for a 3 day this weekend in the rain with 3 of my friends. I carried all kinds of extra crap i would never take on a long trip. About 2 lbs of dry wood, a can of baked beans, i wore my waterproof, leather, work boots. One of my buddies carried a 12x16 poly tarp for us to hang out under, and an extra sleeping bag (trying out a new one). Another friend brought a double burner coleman stove!! He was convinced we wouldn't get a suitable fire to cook on. We had an awesome weekend! Sure we carried a lot of unnecessary stuff but it made the trip memorable.

  6. #6
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    I don't know how I survived all those years wearing blue jeans and t-shirts out in the woods. I guess God takes care of fools and morons.
    I'm not really a hiker, I just play one on White Blaze.

  7. #7
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    I know I'll never wear steel toe boots again while hiking down a mountain. I think all my toes were broken.
    I'm not really a hiker, I just play one on White Blaze.

  8. #8
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    You're wearing jeans, tennis shoes, and got the family tent on your back. You have cans of soup and plan on starting a campfire. Any ultra-heavy campers out there? This is not me but my gear is old and wonder what others think.
    Other than the sneakers, that is how I started. I now wear sneakers when hiking.



    I do not like hiking in blue jeans because they are heavy and constrictive. When they get wet, they suck heat out of you. If you are on a budget (and don't like the shorts/underwear combo), some cheap Dickies (poly-cotton 65/35 blend) from the thifter works fine for 3 season backpacking.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  9. #9
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    I agree with the other responses. How you hike/backpack is totally your call, and what others think shouldn't really matter. What DOES matter is safety and enjoyment. Safety means cotton is bad. Since your stuff is old, I'm reading between the lines that that means you may not want to spend a thousand dollars on new stuff, just yet. Walmart has UnderArmor-like base layer for cheap money (like $12). If your old gear works for you, then that's all that is important.

  10. #10
    Crazy Larry #1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    You're wearing jeans, tennis shoes, and got the family tent on your back. You have cans of soup and plan on starting a campfire. Any ultra-heavy campers out there? This is not me but my gear is old and wonder what others think.
    At least once or twice a month I witness the Jethro's of the Beverly Hillbilly's walk down the trail in either direction....

  11. #11
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    Default ???????

    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    You're wearing jeans, tennis shoes, and got the family tent on your back. You have cans of soup and plan on starting a campfire. Any ultra-heavy campers out there? This is not me but my gear is old and wonder what others think.
    Ahhh, visions of Emma "Grandma" Gatewood.

  12. #12
    Registered User Lostone's Avatar
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    After spending a year or so reading all the opinions posted here.


    It is very clear that there is no right or wrong answers. You use what works for you. Don't worry about gear, brand names or status symbols.


    Pack your gear and enjoy your trip.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    You're wearing jeans, tennis shoes, and got the family tent on your back. You have cans of soup and plan on starting a campfire. Any ultra-heavy campers out there? This is not me but my gear is old and wonder what others think.

    Everyone has to start somewhere, and most of the folks I know started the way you are suggesting. I am assuming that your going on a short distance on an overnighter and checking to make sure that no rain is in the forecast.

    Some of my best memories are those early experiences.

    Go and have fun.

  14. #14
    Hike smarter, not harder.
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    Better to be out there, than sitting home worrying about what other people think.
    Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe - Thomas Sowell

  15. #15
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    Default

    As long as they're enjoying themselves, being considerate of others and staying safe...who cares?

  16. #16

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    Man, back in the 70's all we had were jeans and flannel.

    Nowadays I am fortunate enough to be able to afford more modern hiking attire. But as Mags and others have pointed out so well, you can find good stuff cheap (check out thrift stores - you won't believe the great things there).

    Some bad trail memories for me involve unasked for/unwanted critiquing of my gear. I don't ever offer any opinion on another person's gear unless asked directly, and even then I try to spin positive on their choice.

    Most of all, just be comfortable in your own skin and enjoy yourself.

  17. #17
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    All of these discusions about "proper" gear and the "right" way to do it....blah, blah blah...

    Everyone is so freaking spoiled now. I hope you all realise that for decades before the widespread availibility of silnylon and other "miracle" modern fabrics those old-timers were humping heavy gear up and down all of your trails. So I ask who the "real" hikers are: the gram wienies or those folks that pioneered the way with canvas tents and external frame packs?

    I'm not saying you are wrong for making your pack as light as you can--I do it too but lets get off this pseudo-religion of UL Ok? As long as you are safe, enjoying yourself and not ruining it for others there is no right or wrong way to pack.
    Take almost nothing I say seriously--if it seems to make no sense what so ever it's probably meant as a joke....but do treat your water!

  18. #18

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    All I wore back in the 70s and 80s for regular winter hiking was jeans and a flannel shirt. Also packed or wore wool socks, wool sweater, down vest, polarguard parka, regular thermals, Tent.

    For a short hike it doesnt matter as long as you dont get wet.

    In 74 I hitched around the entire country and went on numorous hiking excursions, trail hikes, NM, Utah, Colo, Grand Canyon, Cali. I was gone for months. All I had was jeans and a couple of shirts, one flannel. Never had a problem except one time when we were sleeping in a bad spot and I woke up in my down bag with the bottom soaked.

  19. #19
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tammons View Post

    For a short hike it doesnt matter as long as you dont get wet.
    Bingo.

    Spend the $10 total for an old pair of Dickies and some synthetic blend of shirts (again, the 65/35 blend is OK. Blair sells 100% acrlyic shirts for cheap and they often wind up in the thrifter). I am not macho..I don't see why I have to make myself uncomfortable and possibly unsafe when you can spend a a 10 spot.

    Anyway, this type of discussion comes up often. "I have older gear that may not be functional as I like...but I don't want to spend a lot of money"

    I don't blame people. Who wants to spend a lot of $$$ for the simple act of walking. But, you DON'T have to spend a lot of money to get basic, functional and relatively comfortable gear. Again, I am a wus.. and I suspect the uber-macho men who carried canvas tents and similar would prefer lighter, functional gear, too. (Eric Ryback, he of the 70bs lbs ND first person to thru-hike the PCT said as such at a recent PCT gathering!)

    The main thing, though, is what I call the three only real rules of the outdoors:


    1. Be safe
    2. Be courteous to other outdoor users
    3. Have fun!


    1 and 3 are easier to do with some functional gear that won't leave you cold and wet. Not too mention the countless people who now hate camping and backpacking because they were cold, wet and miserable.




    BOILER PLATE COPY AND PASTE FROM
    http://www.pmags.com/joomla/index.ph...rs-Primer.html



    Quality Gear on the Cheap: If you read those glossy outdoor magazines, you'd think you need a $300 pack, a $300 shell and a $300 fleece. You do not need expensive gear to enjoy backpacking. Often the brand name gear, besides being expensive, is heavy, bulky and overkill for what is supposed to be for the simple joy of walking.
    Though written for the Appalachian Trail, the general concepts apply for quality gear on the cheap:
    http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...678#post206678


    Some additional information I will add is that you should invest in a decent sleeping bag. The Campmor down bag is rated to 20F and is known as a good budget bag.
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___40065


    Need long underwear, hats, gloves, socks, etc? Check out Warm Stuff Distributing (aka The Underwear Guys) . Run, in part, by the well-know thru-hiker Fiddlehead, it features the basics for very reasonable prices. It is mainly surplus, seconds and irregulars. I find this type of clothing is not functionally different from the Patagucci clothing, is sometimes lighter and it is always less expensive!

    If you are looking for a light, compressible and warm jacket check out an army liner jacket
    (mentioned in the above article, but deserves to be emphasized) :

    http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q=field+jacket+liner&scoring=p


    If you don't mind a bit of sewing, you can make a Montbell Thermawrap clone for less than $20 with the above liner jacket. A men's large comes in at 12oz! Considering a Montbell Thermawrap is $150 and weights 10oz, the cheap way is nice for those on a budget on who need something warm, light and cheap!

    Check it out: http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=41034


    For high altitude/desert hiking I suggest a long sleeve synthetic shirt for the princely sum of $4 from many thrift stores. (Old uniform shirts, acrylic shirts from Blair, rayon blends, heck,,.even the 65/35 blends are fine!) I've used this type of shirt for literally several thousand miles of backpacking.
    Last edited by Mags; 10-21-2009 at 12:37.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  20. #20

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    I never wear cotton now if I am going to be out for even a few days. Those were the post Hipie days and I would not be caught dead without jeans.

    Wearing cotton now is just not worth the risk and its heavy. I hit the salvation army every week on 50% off day. I usually find something that works, silk shirts, poly, wool, etc.

    Found a new down vest there a couple of weeks ago for $5.

    There are always wool suit pants and sweaters there of some sort.
    Always a ton of fleece too, but I dont care for fleece to much.

    I would say if you are going to spend decent $ on something to do with clothing, go for good shoes, wool socks, merino base layer and good breathable rain gear. Maybe a good insulated jacket like a montbell thermawarp. Other than that you can get everything else for pretty cheap.

    I have found 2 sets of insulated pants at the Salvation army. Both $4. One weighs 14 oz which is not too bad. The others are thick, black ski bibs. 1#4oz. Still not too bad for what they are.

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