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  1. #1
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    Default "Training" for my 2010 thru??? Any advice or critique?

    I've decided to "train" for my thru. I figure, it might make those first three weeks slightly more pleasant if I was a bit in shape.

    So this morning, I hit the gym. Everyone there (at the hour of 7:45, three people, the janitor and the front desk person) seemed to think it was really weird when I started on the elliptical/cross trainer, whatever they call it machine in my hiking boots and loaded pack. I know, I know. The best training is just to hike. But, I have limited time, and it is so much easier sometimes to get on the machine and get back off.

    So I'm startng out a bit slow- just on a "level" setting, did about two or three miles- I'll gradually increase slope and distance.

    Does this sound like a good approach? Or is there something better I could be doing?

    Is anyone else "training" for their upcoming thru?

  2. #2
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    And my pack wasn't fully loaded. I kind of didn't want to train for the thru- just wanted to start and see how well I do, and honestly, I've always done well enough on other hikes I've done, but I think it might actually make a bit of a difference... Any thoughts?

  3. #3
    Registered User Pacific Tortuga's Avatar
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    Any and all training will not hurt. IMO the best thing you can do is listen to your body and feet while on the Trail. Carry a good supply of Advil.
    At 19 you will be able to over come many more pain's than most, good luck and have fun.

  4. #4
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    Thanks Tortuga- I plan to have a hearty supply of advil/ ibuprofin (shoprite brand, perhaps).

  5. #5

    Default

    Ditch the pack and find one of these:

    http://www.globalfitness.com/detail_...hine.asp?id=48

    Get on it 2-3 times each week, just hike/walk with your pack for an "easy day" workout.

    The most efficient(especially time-wise), effective conditioning program in the world is www.crossfit.com This will take a while to get up to speed on, there is quite a learning curve, and you can't do a lot of it while you are on your thru, though there are lots of bodyweight exercises.

  6. #6

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    Aleve works much better for me. Good luck on the training. Sounds good.

  7. #7

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    IMO, if you don't live in the mountains where you can actually hike to train, then running is the best preparation. Keep in mind that running is a very high-injury activity, so don't let your training cause you to miss your event. Easy does it at first.

    litefoot 2000

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pacific Tortuga View Post
    Any and all training will not hurt. IMO the best thing you can do is listen to your body and feet while on the Trail. Carry a good supply of Advil.
    At 19 you will be able to over come many more pain's than most, good luck and have fun.
    If you are "eating" NSAIDs (advil, motrin, etc) days on end, you are suffering from chronic inflammation. If you are suffering from chronic inflammation, your sugar-laden diet is likely the culprit. Days 2 thru 5 give me moderately sore legs as I start hiking in the morning, after that, I'm typically pain free, not that the soreness is that bad. I seldom need to take anything. I believe this is because I eat a diet that is based on Zone Diet parameters (40/30/30) carbs,protein and fat.

  9. #9
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    I'm hoping not to take too much advil or whatnot, because in my opinion, the more you take, the less it they works. (I'm not really sure about that though)

  10. #10
    Registered User lazy river road's Avatar
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    The stair master that takes a knee posted is a great machine...the machine that I am using to train for my E2E of the long trail is called the versa climb...it is a vertical climbing machine. If you can find a gym that has this I would highly suggest start using this machine. Also instead of using your pack...you might want to buy a weight vest. Just get your body used to carrying xtra weight
    Half of the people can be part right all of the time,Some of the people can be all right part of the time. But all the people can't be all right all the time

  11. #11
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    I think I'll stick to the pack- it is, after all, what I'll be carrying for six months. Might as well get used to that instead of a weight vest. (I might drop the pack until about a month before I leave though- it is a bit uneccesary for now)

  12. #12
    Garlic
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShelterLeopard View Post
    I'm hoping not to take too much advil or whatnot, because in my opinion, the more you take, the less it they works. (I'm not really sure about that though)
    That's good. Taking pain relief meds is like removing a smoke detector during a fire. Your body's trying to tell you something with the pain--it's best to listen, rest, then try something that doesn't hurt. Not only that, the meds are pretty toxic.

    Good advice above about not injuring yourself while training, and running is a good way to get hurt. The elliptical trainer is low impact, at least. So is just plain walking, but yes, it takes a lot of time. Nobody said an AT thru hike is easy or pain-free.

    Concentrate on your body weight--hopefully you're not obese. Work on aerobic capacity too, for the climbs, and thigh and calf strength with squats. Eat well.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  13. #13
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    I'll admit, I'm a bit overweight. But not "obese". And hopefully by the end of the trail, I be a lean, mean hiking machine! (I'll have to remember not to be an eating machine once I stop hiking)

  14. #14
    Registered User Pacific Tortuga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by take-a-knee View Post
    If you are "eating" NSAIDs (advil, motrin, etc) days on end, you are suffering from chronic inflammation. If you are suffering from chronic inflammation, your sugar-laden diet is likely the culprit. Days 2 thru 5 give me moderately sore legs as I start hiking in the morning, after that, I'm typically pain free, not that the soreness is that bad. I seldom need to take anything. I believe this is because I eat a diet that is based on Zone Diet parameters (40/30/30) carbs,protein and fat.
    Advil's never hurt me but knowing it's contraindication's could be helpful.

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    I was in the same boat you are in preparing for my thru. there are not alot of good trails around me and time was an issue. What i did was get on the treadmill for 30 minuites starting at an incline of 0.0 i increased the incline by 1 every minuite up to 15 and decreased it by 1 every minuite back down to zero which equals 30 min, and repeat. It will be easy for the first 5 or 10 minuites and gets harder as you get closer to 15, if it becomes too easy to complete a circuit increase the speed. This wont do anything for your feet so get some trail miles on the weekends or whenever you have the time.

  16. #16

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    I train for long distance trails by getting up from the couch to change channels instead of using the remote.

    I recommend not taking any pain medication at all. You can't listen to your body if the drugs are yelling that everything is fine.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  17. #17
    Registered User le loupe's Avatar
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    I'm a section hiker and I used a treadmill also (like Oklahoma).

    I went right for the gusto and started on the 12% grade. Speed was generally 3 or 3 1/2 MPH. I started out with a mile and gradually increased the distance as I got more comfortable. From time to time i would even run the final 1/10 mile.

  18. #18
    Registered User Pacific Tortuga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    I train for long distance trails by getting up from the couch to change channels instead of using the remote.

    I recommend not taking any pain medication at all. You can't listen to your body if the drugs are yelling that everything is fine.

    With out pain med's how can you look in the mirror

    don't forget your treks to the fridge.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pacific Tortuga View Post
    With out pain med's how can you look in the mirror

    don't forget your treks to the fridge.
    I avoid mirrors entirely, not just because of the pain but also the whole soul-stealing aspect.

    You're right, though. I forgot about all of the walks to the fridge, which, strangely, is on the second floor of my place and therefore gives me some stair climbing exercise.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  20. #20

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    I practiced balance by walking the sidewalk curb, first without a pack, and then, with a pack.

    I was told not to do deep knee bends. The explanation was shallow knee-bends are better for walking with a pack in the mountains.

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