Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 129

Thread: tarps suck!!!!

  1. #61

    Default

    On my PCT hike I used a tent sometimes, and a tarp others, and cowboy camped as much as I could.

    I used an Etowah II alchohol stove for some of the trip, and also used an MSR Pocket Rocket.

    I liked all of my gear, and used different gear in different circumstances. I'm either switching back and forth between cults, or I'm in a third cult that believes that the "right" gear depends on where you are, what you're doing, the weather, the altitude, what other weight you're carrying, how many people you're traveling with, and other factors.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  2. #62
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-20-2003
    Location
    Lovely Mayretta
    Posts
    4,229
    Images
    10

    Default

    Do you honestly expect anyone to choose their gear based on where they're hiking, their abilities and expected weather, and not some cast-in-concrete notion of what's "right" and what's "wrong?"

    Get thee behind me, Satan!
    Me no care, me here free beer. Tap keg, please?

  3. #63

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Two Speed View Post
    Do you honestly expect anyone to choose their gear based on where they're hiking, their abilities and expected weather, and not some cast-in-concrete notion of what's "right" and what's "wrong?"

    Get thee behind me, Satan!
    Hahahahahaha! Reason runs counter to belief, which makes my cult evil.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  4. #64
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-20-2003
    Location
    Lovely Mayretta
    Posts
    4,229
    Images
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    Hahahahahaha! Reason runs counter to belief
    As well it should.
    which makes my cult evil.
    Was there any doubt? Now be gone!
    Me no care, me here free beer. Tap keg, please?

  5. #65
    Registered User 300winmag's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-01-2010
    Location
    Hennderson, Nevada
    Posts
    256

    Default Cults or "tribes"

    OK, maybe you tarpers (and hammockers) are not in cults, just "shelter tribes".

    But alky stove users ARE in a cult. Thsy love playing with them and building "better" ones and endlessly discussing the merits and demerits of different models. Having used them frequently in my checkered past I'll say the ONLY efficient alky stove I've seen is the Caldera cone, IMHO. And still, the fuel weight is not efficient after 3-4 days.

    Eric

  6. #66
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-20-2003
    Location
    Lovely Mayretta
    Posts
    4,229
    Images
    10

    Default

    Ah jeez, someone got a link to Rock's article on that subject?

    Found it. Short version is for most hikers on hikes less than 7 days* duration an alcohol stove was the lightest, the Cat Stove IIRC. Yeah, alky stoves burn more fuel per day, but the higher fixed weight of the canister and gasoline stoves screws you until the higher heat value of the fuel starts to kick in on longer duration hikes.

    * 10 days? Gonna have to re-read the article for understanding.
    Last edited by Two Speed; 01-13-2010 at 14:12.
    Me no care, me here free beer. Tap keg, please?

  7. #67
    Registered User sasquatch2014's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-19-2007
    Location
    Pawling NY
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,986
    Images
    785

    Default

    When I think soda can stoves and the like I always think of it as UL stuff and I was once told that one of the principles of this is that you should try to have items serve dual purposes, therefor if you use and Alcohol stove you should use fuel that you can also drink. Moonshine works fine for this then you can spend your time tinkering with your still instead.
    Often Accused, Often Guilty but Seldom Guilty of What I am Accused.

  8. #68
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    46
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 300winmag View Post
    O
    But alky stove users ARE in a cult. Thsy love playing with them and building "better" ones and endlessly discussing the merits and demerits of different models. Having used them frequently in my checkered past I'll say the ONLY efficient alky stove I've seen is the Caldera cone, IMHO. And still, the fuel weight is not efficient after 3-4 days.
    I used a cut-off soda can bottom for the majority of the CDT. Really haven't improved it much since (unless you count new foil for my windscreen. ) It boiled water in ~5 minutes.

    As an aside, an alchy stove loses efficiency after about 10 boils for the general standard ~2 cups for ea. meal. (I don't like thinking in terms of days as everyone is different in the amount of meals they do).

    For longer hikes, I now go stoveless.

    The only cult-like gear users are those who collect gear and hike less. As a person hikes more (generally speaking) gear is talked about less.

    Grandma Mags was an awesome cook. What she could whip on a Sunday was simply amazing. Christmas? Those Italian cookies people pay $$$ in the chi-chi bakeries? Out of her memory she could make a tray that would make any so-called foodie salivate. I never heard her discuss the knife to use, or what brand of pot or the merits of this type of cutting board vs. another one.

    She simply cooked. She simply baked. And it was awesome.

    The "foodies" who go to Peppercorn and spend $50 for a garlic press will never, ever cook as well as my grandmother with a simple knife, some heat, a trusty pot and a spoon.

    In the same way, those who drone on endlessly on why their choice is great and others suck (as opposed to saying why it works for THEIR way of backpacking. Subtle, but important difference), spend more time collecting gear and less time outdoors.

    On trips with friends, we don't compare stoves...we hike and enjoy the gorgeous Colorado night ski.

    On the thru-hikes, people who are gear centric are mostly ignored.

    It is just gear. The least important part of backpacking. Tell us why you use a piece of gear. Why it works for you. But to somehow think a piece of gear is "best" or "better" than another person's choice? Pure gear wankery for gear hobbyists who are online.
    Last edited by Mags; 01-13-2010 at 15:58.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  9. #69
    Registered User DavidNH's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2005
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,050

    Default tarps

    Tarps are great until you get to bug season. Then they are horrible.

    Solution: a tarp tent from henry Shire. loads of ventilation yet netting keeps out the bugs!

    I know this sounds like an ad but its the truth!

    DavidNH

  10. #70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mags View Post
    For longer hikes, I now go stoveless.
    I carry a stove on longer hikes, but I make up for the weight penalty by going pantsless.
    Drab as a Fool, as aloof as a Bard!

    http://www.wizardsofthepct.com

  11. #71
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    46
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    I carry a stove on longer hikes, but I make up for the weight penalty by going pantsless.
    Brings the concept of full moon hiking to another whole level....

    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  12. #72
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-19-2003
    Location
    Texas
    Age
    72
    Posts
    1,979
    Images
    1

    Default

    I have a Zoid, a Tarptent Rainbow, and a Warbonnet Blackbird hammock. Loved my Zoid, till I got the Tarptent (1 lb lighter)... Loved my Tarptent, till the rain in Maine fell mainly on me and the slant I had to sleep on cause I was too slow to get a real tentsite... Thus the hammock... No more worries! Dry and comfortable! So my MacCat tarp goes with me and my hammock. I don't think I'd use it alone, though.. So I love my hammock and my tarp!

  13. #73
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-06-2007
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Age
    63
    Posts
    2,000

    Default

    300winmag said:
    "But alky stove users ARE in a cult. Thsy love playing with them and building "better" ones and endlessly discussing the merits and demerits of different models."
    I know some car enthusiasts who are always talking about tweaking their cars, modifying them in some way, racing them, etc. In fact, however, a person can own and use a car without doing any of that. Ditto an alcohol stove.

    "Having used them frequently in my checkered past I'll say the ONLY efficient alky stove I've seen is the Caldera cone, IMHO. And still, the fuel weight is not efficient after 3-4 days."
    As a recent convert to a Caldera cone, I have no issues with the first sentence above. :-)
    But fuel weight efficiency --- it depends on different factors, IMO it shouldn't be considered so open-and-shut. For example, on a solo trip I heat 1.5 to 2 cups of water a day on a one time basis (dinner only). This requires less than a fluid oz of fuel, somewhere in the 1/2 to 2/3 fluid oz range. So 8 fluid ounces of fuel lasts me at least 12 days. A fluid ounce of alcohol fuel weighs less than an oz, about 0.82 oz.

    Even a small fuel cannister is a fairly heavy chunk of metal; an empty smaller size Snow Peak cannister weighs 2.6 oz, whereas an alcohol fuel bottle might weigh half that at most. At least my first two to three days of fuel are "free" just by dint of not carrying a heavy metal cannister (not factoring in here that the stove plus windscreen is likely lighter as well).

    So for myself, at least, I don't buy the "not efficient after 3-4 days" claim. Certainly if you're cooking multiple times a day or for multiple people the dynamics are different. Even so, another way to look at it is that if fuel weight makes the alcohol stove user start the trip with a heavier stove+fuel setup, at some point s/he hits a break even point and for the remaining trip days the alcohol setup is lighter. For this reason I still bring the alcohol stove when I'm hiking with my wife.

  14. #74
    Registered User gunner76's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-04-2009
    Location
    Otway North Carolina
    Age
    67
    Posts
    779
    Images
    21

    Default

    I take a tent but might not set it up depending on the weather but a few times the skeeters have forced me to use my tent when I had not planned on it. I did use a tarp one time when a friend and I were caught in a heavy rain and we could not find a level enough place for the tent but did find a spot just small enough for the tarp. Did not stay completly dry but we did survive the night.

    Its all a personal choice of what you like and conditions.
    Hammock Hanger by choice

    Warbonnet BlackBird 1.7 dbl


    www.neusioktrail.org

    Bears love people, they say we taste just like chicken.

  15. #75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mags View Post
    I used a cut-off soda can bottom for the majority of the CDT. Really haven't improved it much since (unless you count new foil for my windscreen. ) It boiled water in ~5 minutes.

    As an aside, an alchy stove loses efficiency after about 10 boils for the general standard ~2 cups for ea. meal. (I don't like thinking in terms of days as everyone is different in the amount of meals they do).

    For longer hikes, I now go stoveless.

    The only cult-like gear users are those who collect gear and hike less. As a person hikes more (generally speaking) gear is talked about less.

    Grandma Mags was an awesome cook. What she could whip on a Sunday was simply amazing. Christmas? Those Italian cookies people pay $$$ in the chi-chi bakeries? Out of her memory she could make a tray that would make any so-called foodie salivate. I never heard her discuss the knife to use, or what brand of pot or the merits of this type of cutting board vs. another one.

    She simply cooked. She simply baked. And it was awesome.

    The "foodies" who go to Peppercorn and spend $50 for a garlic press will never, ever cook as well as my grandmother with a simple knife, some heat, a trusty pot and a spoon.

    In the same way, those who drone on endlessly on why their choice is great and others suck (as opposed to saying why it works for THEIR way of backpacking. Subtle, but important difference), spend more time collecting gear and less time outdoors.

    On trips with friends, we don't compare stoves...we hike and enjoy the gorgeous Colorado night ski.

    On the thru-hikes, people who are gear centric are mostly ignored.

    It is just gear. The least important part of backpacking. Tell us why you use a piece of gear. Why it works for you. But to somehow think a piece of gear is "best" or "better" than another person's choice? Pure gear wankery for gear hobbyists who are online.
    shazzam!!

  16. #76
    Registered User LIhikers's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-2004
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,257
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jersey joe View Post
    Bugs are probably the main reason that I prefer tenting over tarping when backpacking. Especially when the mosquitos are out in full force.

    I'll second that!
    I can remember this one night in Massachusetts where the skeeters drove about 8 people out of a shelter, one by one.

  17. #77

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester2000 View Post
    Hahaha! Well, I do know an awful lot of dumbasses. Comes from being in Billville. But if you're really hungry, I suppose there are worse things to eat . . .
    Well said!....my socks taste far worse than my tent does!....just my opinion.

    geek

  18. #78

    Default

    Too many choices to call any single thing correct.

    I love tarping...should never get wet if you know what you are doing, have lots of space, can stand up for dressing, having visitors or just to wait out bad weather more comforably, can cook inside, can use DEET the few times that it is needed.

    Your HS tarptent will keep you from the bugs until you have to go outside every few hours to adjust it.

    Will never stop using my cannister stove because everything else that I've used is a hassle compared to it...light and cook...poof! Simmers, boils, always lighter than any alky stove that I have and no problem finding cannisters. If you use it alot, you know when you will run out of fuel...no need for a second cannister.

    Skunks will not spray or bother you if you just let them go their way...they are just nosey and curious.

    Careful that you don't step out of your hammock onto that rattle snake passing under you!

    Waaayyy too many scenarios!...Use what works for you because you will never change me.

    geek

  19. #79
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    687
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch2014 View Post
    And there is no chance that they could have picked up the tick while hiking to where they were setting up camp. Ticks like to drop onto their host so it is more likely that the tick was already there. Most ticks have a hard time getting through the sil-nylon. Not that it couldn't happen but then again I think that there are some people who may have slept in a tent and gotten lymes as well. Has been known to happen.
    Naw: it's just that ticks prefer tarps themselves.
    "Keep moving: death is very, very still."
    ---Lily Wagner (nee Hennessy)

  20. #80
    aka -OvertheEdge- :)
    Join Date
    09-08-2008
    Location
    Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, United States
    Age
    59
    Posts
    583
    Images
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Adams View Post
    Well said!....my socks taste far worse than my tent does!....just my opinion.

    geek
    And you know this HOW? Wow talk about hiker hunger!
    Alcohol was involved!

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •