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  1. #1
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    Default Looking for lightweight hikers/trail runners

    I'm hiking the southern half starting March 1st. Any good ideas for a pair of lightweight hikers or trail runners. I think I'd prefer goretex and under 100$. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Trail Runners

    I'd think long and hard about the Goretex. Most brands are over $100 although you can find deals. If it were me (and I've been wearing Trail Runners exclusively) for the past 7 years or more I'd go with a nylon shoe. Gortex is a great product but dirt and grime break the membrane down. Your walking in dirt, your socks are dirty, as are your feet. Once wet it takes longer to dry, and often they take longer to break-in, also they seem to fit tighter than a similar non gore tex model. A nylon shoe with maybe some suede panels for support will generally fit right out of the box, and give you pretty good support and comfort over a days travel. If your planning to use custom supports or thicker socks allow for the extra room. Elsewhere in another forum I suggested finding an online store that has free shipping both ways,order your size plus another pair 1/2 to 1 size larger to get a perfect fit, seems like a hassle but most hike shops only carry a few brands. If you find a shoe you really like I'd buy several pairs companies change the style every few years and most of the improvements downgrade the shoe. It happened to me with the Montrail Hardrock! A few good sources are onlineshoes.com, joesnewbalance.com, bootbay.com
    Good Luck

  3. #3

    Default

    I second the non-Gore-tex shoe. When it rains your feet will get wet, no matter what you wear. A low shoe, especially, is susceptible to overwash, (when you step in a puddle and it goes over the top). If (when) that happens, Gore-tex will only slow the speed at which the inner part of the shoe dries as air and wind cannot pass through it as readily as an open nylon mesh.
    Other than that, buy what fits. Worry about features and durability later. Features and durability won't prevent blisters.
    I never dreamed that I'd be hiking in Asics trail runners, but, one day in Dick's Sporting Goods I saw them on sale and they looked to be the right volume and shape for my feet. I slipped my orthotics into them and, magic! They are my current favorites, but I have feet shaped like Donald Duck's - flat, narrow at the heel and wide at the ball. If your feet look like bricks with toes I guarantee they won't work for you.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  4. #4
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    Default

    Don't keep the water out. Let the water out.

    Check out Adidas Adizero.
    Wicked light, and they don't absorb water, and they have a drain.

    They have no tread though, as in zero, but I think they have similar models for trails.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks everyone for the advice, definitely skipping the Goretex!

  6. #6

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    I stopped getting blisters when I pitched the goretex boots and switched to trail runners. I either hike in an Adidas Trail Response or the Adidas outdoor shoe, Kumasi--has a bit more support but still lightweight. Adidas just happens to fit my narrow foot well, not a commercial...

  7. #7
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    Default

    Check out Inov-8. Most of them are under $100 at Zappos. Since shipping is free, you can order a bunch and return what doesn't fit. The Roclite's are a little narrow, so order up a size or more. The Terroc has a wider toebox, which is nice for long distance hiking. I believe the Mudroc has the same wide toebox as the Terroc, but it have very little padding, which is what led to the Terroc.

    Some people like the New Balance 800 & 900 series shoes, but I found their arch to be way too high and rearward for comfort. The Inov-8's are much flatter. Or, if you use Superfeet Green insoles, you may like the NB's, but you'll probably prefer Inov-8 if you use Superfeet Blue insoles.

  8. #8
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
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    Default

    Got some addidas shoes, don't know the model. Skip the Gortex EXCEPT I have found Gortex socks to be a good thing to have when you have to hike in snow in trail runners - especially that icewater that melting snow turns into.
    SGT Rock
    http://hikinghq.net

    My 2008 Trail Journal of the BMT/AT

    BMT Thru-Hikers' Guide
    -----------------------------------------

    NO SNIVELING

  9. #9
    Registered User Grimelowe's Avatar
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    I've got Adidas AdiZero XT (as in extreme trailrunners?) they have great traction without the holes in the bottoms like other AdiZeros I have. (I worry about rocks, or sticks poking me. I added my hard green Superfeet insoles and they still only weigh 746 grams for the pair. I love them. Adidas seems to fit my narrow feet much better than other runners, but I worry about tearing out the topmost lace holes since it isn't grommeted or reinforced well.
    YMMV.

    Found for $70 @ DSW.

    -Grimey

  10. #10

    Default

    OK Now you don't want Goretex. That's fine. But I would like to know why you wanted Goretex in the first place? If it was because you wanted a warmer waterproof trailrunner/light hiker there are other WP membranes that may meet your desires without some of the cons of a Goretex membrane shoe. There may also be other ways to acheive warmer drier feet without having a WP shoe, if that is your goal.

    Before you totally ditch the idea of having a WP shoe you should know other options exist, especially considering you are coming from Safety Harbor FL, are used to warmer temps, having warm dry feet, and you are starting on Mar 1 when it could not only be wet but also be much colder than you are accustomed. You could also encounter snow. It does snow even in Georgia in April in the Appalacian Mnts. Wet feet in the middle of summer is one thing and wet feet in cold freezing temps is something else! And, although non-WP shoes tend to dry out faster than WP shoes even non-WP shoes can take quite awhile to dry out in freezing temps.

    Your start date is near at hand. It's time to get to a competent outfitter or shoe shop, like a running store, preferably one with a large selection of shoes and spend some time getting your shoes right.

  11. #11
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    Default Trail Runners

    I realize that you are coming from an area where the temps are quite a bit warmer and heading to areas that have had more snow than normal. It's been a record year for sure! There are ways to help keep you and your feet safe and within reason dry, warm, and comfortable. Heck even bums in New York City know to put bread bags on their feet. You could try Seal Skinz, they are kinda hard to find in the states (at least I've had trouble in Va.) Try sealskinz.com. You could try a gaiter or "over gaiter" or a lightweight overboot, Andrew Skurka used this method on a winter hike across Minn. with a lightweight shoe/boot. I use a product called Ezeefit, it's a thin neoprene sock that protects your foot from wet conditions. Inline skaters use them to cut down on blisters. I have used mine while crossing creeks in the winter, my shoe was soaked but my foot was totally dry, the cuff seals pretty good around the calf and water did not come in. There are various methods out there to insure your safety and comfort, plus you will learn from other hikers as you head up the trail. Please understand that any advise that I give is based on hiking over the past 30 years I and my gear have evolved somewhat faster than prehistoric man. But not by much! When I through hiked in 1980 ONE person was wearing a fleece jacket it was something new and untried, now everyone wears it. Enjoy your hike!

  12. #12
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    Default

    Rock has a good point about gortex oversocks being a good thing to carry,
    or something similar like neoprene or nylon or bread bags.

    For snow gators I think I would try and sew some light material directly onto the trail runners.

  13. #13
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    Default

    Lot of great ideas there from Rick also, and others. Thanks Rick.

  14. #14
    Registered User goedde2's Avatar
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    Default

    If you check www.SierraTradingPost.com you can pick up some bargains there.

  15. #15
    Registered User Graywolf's Avatar
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    Default

    Several years ago when I first started reading Trail Journals, lot of hikers were talking alot about the New Balance shoes..Last year when I was looking for a good show for hiking, I found one at a factory outlet store.. I tried them, at half the cost of retail..I was sold..Even though factory outlets usually sale shoes that re less then 100% these lasted me a year and over 500 miles of hiking, including my jaunt on the Southern AT section..I havnt gone back since..I love them..Just bought a new pair and will buy another pair before heading back out in August..

    I don't really like the "sneaker" style shoes as I twisted my my ankle back in 1995 in the Davis mountains..Now I never know when it wants to buckle on me..These shoes has doen the job for me..

    No matter what shoes you purchase, give them at least a week to break them in before hitting the trail, you will be glad you did..

    Graywolf
    "So what if theres a mountain, get over it!!!" - Graywolf, 2010

  16. #16
    Registered User 300winmag's Avatar
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    Default Merrill

    Look at the Merrill Moab series of boots/shoes. Excellent design and quality.

    Eric

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    I second the non-Gore-tex shoe. When it rains your feet will get wet, no matter what you wear. A low shoe, especially, is susceptible to overwash, (when you step in a puddle and it goes over the top). If (when) that happens, Gore-tex will only slow the speed at which the inner part of the shoe dries as air and wind cannot pass through it as readily as an open nylon mesh.
    Other than that, buy what fits. Worry about features and durability later. Features and durability won't prevent blisters.
    I never dreamed that I'd be hiking in Asics trail runners, but, one day in Dick's Sporting Goods I saw them on sale and they looked to be the right volume and shape for my feet. I slipped my orthotics into them and, magic! They are my current favorites, but I have feet shaped like Donald Duck's - flat, narrow at the heel and wide at the ball. If your feet look like bricks with toes I guarantee they won't work for you.
    Correction on the location of purchase. It was at Sports Authority. Major brain meltdown there.

    Did I say that Goretex is hot (as in "too warm").
    It is - for me at least.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  18. #18

    Default

    I personally am going with a pair of new balance minimus mt10 trail running shoes for my SOBO thru hike in june. My backups will be my Chaco Z1 sandals.

  19. #19
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    in my opinion - these are the best I've found for runnning on the AT

    http://www.sportiva.com/products/foo...nning/electron

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