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Thread: My Gear List

  1. #1
    Registered User YoungMoose's Avatar
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    Default My Gear List

    I am thinking about the rainpants. I dont know what im planning on carrying yet for a food bag. anyone have any suggstions. the max amount of days worth of food im carrying is 5 days. I am also thinking about getting midcut boots instead of my torre gtx.


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    Registered User YoungMoose's Avatar
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    damit. i just realized i put up hte wrong link. i will put up a new link once i reformat what im trying to put up.


  3. #3
    Registered User YoungMoose's Avatar
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    ok here is my gear list.


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    Great list, but dump the cotton tshirts and get some poly shirts at walmart. Cotton stays wet forever, gets real heavy with sweat, and doesn't provide any warmth when wet.
    Seems like minor detail, until you get out there.

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    The tent is heavier than needed (5 lb). You could use a tarp and mosquito net. Will you be staying in shelters? If so, then definitely dump the tent for a tarp.

    Have you thought through what you'll be doing for food? Most people manage with one pot and no frying pan, but that depends on how you're cooking. Also, a canister stove (like snowpeak gigapower) would be lighter. Alcohol stoves are lighter still, but most don't simmer which I like to be able to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowleopard View Post
    The tent is heavier than needed (5 lb). You could use a tarp and mosquito net. Will you be staying in shelters? If so, then definitely dump the tent for a tarp.

    Have you thought through what you'll be doing for food? Most people manage with one pot and no frying pan, but that depends on how you're cooking. Also, a canister stove (like snowpeak gigapower) would be lighter. Alcohol stoves are lighter still, but most don't simmer which I like to be able to do.
    Or you could make a Super Cat for > $1.
    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do."

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    What time of year are you planning this trip?
    If you don't make waves, it means you ain't paddling

  8. #8

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    Agree with losing the cotton.
    All your gear is on the heavy end of the spectrum, but if that's what you've got, use it. If you are going by yourself and plan to shelter, leave the tent and bring a tarp. Montrails are a good boot for the trail, albeit a bit heavy, but you will be grateful if it's real muddy. Keens are also very heavy for sandals. Crocs are like $20 and weigh almost nothing.

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    Registered User YoungMoose's Avatar
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    i was only bringing a tent just incase i didnt get to a shelter. but my primary plan is to be sheltering. i know everything of my stuff is on the heavier side. i was thinking about my food and im still not sure. so im still going to leave my pan in the list. i might take it out. The cotton shirts are much more comfortable then the other kind of shirt. im planning on doing it anytime between july-august.


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    I use cotton in summer fairly often. It is not a death sentence. Given the other clothing, I'd not worry about it. As for weight, clothing sizes suggest you can carry the load. You can change this and that for later trips. Have fun.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  11. #11

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    You've covered the basics and then some, especially for the LT. I wear cotton most of the summer as well, but always keep something dry to change into on over-nighters. You could swap 1 t-shirt for a synth or wool. Never used rain pants tho. I'm sure they could be helpful.

    The best way to figure out what works and what doesn't is to bring extra and get out there. You can always mail the excess home along the way.

    And bring a camera.

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    Registered User RGB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungMoose View Post
    i was only bringing a tent just incase i didnt get to a shelter. but my primary plan is to be sheltering. i know everything of my stuff is on the heavier side. i was thinking about my food and im still not sure. so im still going to leave my pan in the list. i might take it out. The cotton shirts are much more comfortable then the other kind of shirt. im planning on doing it anytime between july-august.
    This is absolutely a matter of opinion, and I say use what you like. But I absolutely HATE using cotton during the summer months. Having my back drenched from sweat where my pack is and having to pry the back of my shirt off with a cro-bar is not fun for me. I usually use my running clothes for hiking, and the Brookes running shirts feel amazing during the summer for me. They wick sweat like nobody's business.
    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do."

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    hooray for dr. bronners! good soap.

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    don't forget your map and compass.

    Panzer

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    I'd consider using the cotton shirts for camp/sleep wear and pick up a couple synthetics for the actual hiking. As others have said, once wet, cotton is pretty miserable and (to me at least) irritating. Keeping the sweat next to my skin for hours on end usually gives me a rash. Which sucks.

  16. #16

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    lose the soap , it ends up in the water source, and if you haven't licked the pot clean you probably haven't hiked enough that day

    and lose the shovel...use your heel or poles if you have them. privies are plentiful along the way, using the shovel once or twice isn't worth carrying it.

    i agree with the cotton thing...gets wet and stays wet, so make sure you don't bring cotton socks (you didn't specify). it really likes to rain in vermont and can be surprisingly cold, even in the height of summer

    july/august may be a tricky time to rely on getting a spot in the shelters on the AT section of the LT...see if you can come up with a lighter tent by then. you'll be glad you did

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    Registered User Over The Hill's Avatar
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    I didn't see any water Purifiers/Filters listed. What are you doing for water?
    If your solo-ing you might want to consider the Katadyn Base camp. It may be a bit bulky but I think it has some good features, specially for a solo hiker.
    1) Multi-task: gravity does the work, no pumping. Fill it, hang it, and let it fill your pot or bottle while you are pitching your tent, getting the stove going, whatever. When your alone, you have ALL the chores,your buddy isn't putting th tent up or getting the water boiled for for some more soggy noodles, so any time and effort saved is priceless.
    2) NO moving parts. Have run into far too many people who's handle or some other part broke on their water systems.
    3) Filter will do up to 200 gallons, more than sufficient to do the Long Trail. Carry a few tabs for emergencies and your all set.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vonfrick View Post
    lose the soap , it ends up in the water source, and if you haven't licked the pot clean you probably haven't hiked enough that day
    I'm sure that he'll be super popular with everyone else in the shelter after the first week and a half of not washing his pits out too...
    Planning my 2011 Long Trail E2E.

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