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Thread: Hiking gloves

  1. #1
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    Default Hiking gloves

    Does anyone have any suggestions for hiking gloves? A rugged palm-side is required, but what about the material? I'm thinking a good glove would wick rain away from the skin. eVent mitts are too expensive.

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  3. #3

    Default gloves

    Gloves are problematice for me. On my thru attempt this year I finally went with event mitts ( I know they are expensive ) and wool liners. I started out with insulated gloves but the sweat just made my hands cold. I tried silnylon mits but sweating was an even bigger problem with them. Good luck.

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    How did the Event mitts work sweat wise?

    Any links to wool liners?

  5. #5

    Default Gloves

    Event worked well although most of the cold weather was gone by the time I got them. I use Ibex wool liners. They are expensive but feel really good wearing and wick the sweat away pretty good. http://ibex.com/shop/product/1651/92...ex-glove-liner I have some Smartwool liners also. They are good but not as comfortable as the Ibex.

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    I would reccomend good thin, wicking poly-pro liners and Burton snowboard gloves. The pair I have now are 4 years old, have stood up to sharp edges, tree branches and about 25 days of riding a year. My hands have NEVER been cold with this combo depsite sub-zero Vermont winters and sweating them through on warm spring days. You can get them in the gauntlet style over glove (my preference) or an under-glove that will tuck under your jacket like the park-rats wear.
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    I use full fingered cycling gloves. They fit great which means I don't have to take them off to do most things. Decent price and I've beaten the hell out of mine and most pairs can take it.

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    I think all gloves suck. They're either too cold, they leak or get sweaty. Sometimes all at once. If I use anything, I use mittens.

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    Yeah i'm a mitten lover too... I'm in the market for new gloves/mitts and ultimately would love to find a good liner glove, preferabily marino wool, and a good all weather lightly insulated over mitt.

    I want something light while hiking in them, with something warmer I can slip over while in camp.

    Suggestions?

    What's your setup leaftye?

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    DAJA.
    For shame. For wool mitts and hats you should be using Briggs & Little wool.

    Actually in really cold dry conditions, merino wool or alpaca is nice, and can be somewhat warmer than a hand knit british type wool. For that head and neck area too, even in cold wet weather, merino or alpaca is good. For skin layers, I think merino wool or cashmere is the way to go. But for cold wet conditions you really do want to try a pair of hand knit wool mitts, using a Briggs & Little Wool, either a 100% wool of some local breed, or perhaps that Tuffy stuff that has a little nylon in it. I am not exactly sure what type of Briggs & Little wool my mitts are. But they are really warm, even in a cold wind with the wind and rain blowing through them. They defy science, they really do. I think it is some sort of heat recovery thing going on. When I do need to slip something over them I jut pull my sleeves over them or put them in my pockets or front pouch.

    Try a pair of heavy hand-knit socks also. They are not as durable as you might like, but they really do something for your feet that smartwool type socks do not. They work well as an oversock or as a single layer. As a single layer they are great for revitalizing cold damp feet and toes. Again you want a tough british type wool.

    If you do your own knitting projects, use a thick coarse wool because you will get a much thicker sock or mitts or neck tube or peruvian type hat or sweater, and alot less stitches. For thinner items, just get a thrift store sweater or smartwool socks or maybe some pricey icebreaker tops or boxers. But for something thick you should really consider having something hand knit. There are knitting machines also, which might be something to try for a blanket or poncho. I might try some primitive weaving some day also.

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    DAJA, if I bring anything for my hands at all, it's usually just my convertible mittens. I have two inexpensive sets, one wool, other fleece. I don't think I've ever hiked or camped in anything below 20 degrees fahrenheit, and the convertible mittens have performed very well in those conditions. I have brought shells a few times, but never used them since I found that the convertible mittens were still warm enough even when damp. The only time I've wanted a glove was this spring, and not for warmth. I wanted them to protect my knuckles from getting bloodied up as I self arrested dozens of times on icy snow. I was using my convertible mittens with the top up for dexterity, but I was scraping my 2nd & 3rd knuckles.

    I may make an effort to improve my mitten situation for next winter. I'd like to replace the mitten part of my convertible mitten with a lighter more compressible down version. I'm still looking for my ideal latex or nitrile mittens to use as an emergency vapor barrier....they should also be enough all by itself to keep my hands warm when it rains. Lastly, very lastly, I'd like to make my own set of superlight shells. I've never needed them, but for some reason I think I might need them someday.

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    Default bike gloves

    Quote Originally Posted by twosticks View Post
    I use full fingered cycling gloves. They fit great which means I don't have to take them off to do most things. Decent price and I've beaten the hell out of mine and most pairs can take it.
    ditto on bike gloves.

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    Here is a good wool. I think it is best to go with something hnd-knit in a single layer. Don't bother with double layers, or thrumbing, or felting, or any of that nonsense. Just a single layer, using a thick coarse yarn of a british-type wool. Holds up better when wet than a merino wool, although I do have a merino sweater that is very good when wet also. I just think for really cold and wet conditions, you go with sheep that live in really cold and wet conditions, and least for thicker layers like mitts and hats and heavy socks and heavy sweaters and blankets.

    Good mitt wools for tough single knit thick mitts or socks:

    Medium:
    http://www.briggsandlittle.com/wool/...yarn&PROD=4001
    http://www.briggsandlittle.com/wool/...yarn&PROD=4004
    Thicker:
    http://www.briggsandlittle.com/wool/...yarn&PROD=4006
    Thickest:
    http://www.briggsandlittle.com/wool/...yarn&PROD=4007

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    All four seasons I use military surplus wool glove liners and a shell mitt of some sort.

    For backcountry skiing, I'll add some thicker wool mittens if need be (rarely while moving).

    I found over the years that layering works well not just core and legs, but also for my hands.

    When moving in winter, I find the liner gloves to be enough. Throw on the shells? I am good in many conditions (Again, esp while moving).


    As for an emergency vapor barrier? It's called Bagtex! Use bread bags..works for hands or feet. I keep two ofthem in my winter stuff sack.
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    For what temp range? WP or not? Thru-hiking? Climbing? Some combination of activities? UL?

    Different gloves for different uses!

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    Would you need glove/mittens for a SOBO thru?

    I never even thought of this...
    21.1% Done

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    I haven't yet had to wear gloves while hiking, but your question got me thinking - I used to have a pair of golf gloves - fleece, but the palm and fingers were dotted with a rubber material to help securely grip the golf club. I wonder if they would work out well on the trail and help hold onto my hiking poles?
    Everyone's first question:
    "Wow - How tall are you?"
    Answer: "I'm 6'6""
    Ergo, my trail name: 'Six-Six'

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    I have considered using Mechanix gloves. They are not too expensive, they give you a good grip, they breathe and give some protection from the elements. They are not waterproof, but they dry quick. They should also be easy to replace for Thru Hikers. My pack has Mechanix gloves and a pair of fleece gloves for when it get really cold.

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    make sure they are waterproof...i hate when making a snowball ruins my gloves for days...fleece gloves are NO GOOD...
    Check out my website: www.serialhiking.com

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    You should try making snowballs with some handknit mitts or gloves, using a coarse british type wool like Briggs&Little yarns. They don't need to be waterprrof to be warm when wet or good in snow. You don't even need doubleknit or nylon overmitts. Squeeze 'em out if they get wet. Beat the snow off them if it builds up. Wicked warm.

    http://www.briggsandlittle.ca/wool/p...yarn&PROD=4001

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