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  1. #1
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    Default UL trail runners, and camp shoes

    Looking for an UL trail runner. The New Balance ones are sticking out to me. Any feedback? I'm assuming most people get water resistant, not waterproof ones.

    Also, for a through hike, I'm going to want camp shoes. The best idea for this I've come up with is to use an UL racing shoe, has anyone else done this?

  2. #2
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    No point in water resistance. The low top means water can easily get in. Get the most breathable shoe you can to prevent blisters and help wet shoes dry out faster.

    Even racing shoes are pretty heavy compared to trail running shoes.

    If you want camp shoes to have something dry to wear in camp, then a better solution may be to wear a vapor barrier over thin socks and wear your shoes. This would help your shoes dry out faster while in camp.

  3. #3
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    Lafuma makes some very durable trail runner/UL hikers...i got 600 miles out of a pair that fit like a glove and broke in right out the box...
    Check out my website: www.serialhiking.com

  4. #4
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    Default UL Trail Runners

    It would be helpful if you shared your defintion of "UL."

    I loved the INOV-8 X-Talon 212 (212g/7.5oz) on the PCT, racking up ~1000 mi on my last pair.

    The NB 101 (221g/7.8oz), Inov-8 X-Talon 190 (190g/6.7oz), and F-lite 195 (195g/6.9oz) are new this fall.

    Is this what you're looking for, or are you thinking something more substantial?

    -ed

  5. #5
    Garlic
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    I've been using the NB 8XX series for six seasons now--started with 806, now have 813. They're great shoes if they fit you. They come in three widths to help that out. I can't quite get 1000 miles out of a pair, more like 800 max.

    If you use these, I see no need for camp shoes as well. One of the best reasons to use trail runners is that they're so comfortable you don't need to change shoes at the end of the day. Just loosen the laces.

    I use Leaftye's vapor barrier idea, too (Bagtex). I always carry a couple extra bread bags.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  6. #6
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    I'm hiking mainly in some Asics Hyperlight XC cross-country runners right now, and they're light and comfy enough for wearing all day in pretty much any conditions. At about 6 ounces and $50 I felt they were a pretty good deal. My only issue is the soles are not at all sticky; I value traction over durability. Next I'll probably get one of the new Inov8s Suttree mentioned.

    A big question is how much cushioning your feet require. My current shoes, and the ones mentioned by Suttree, have very very little cushioning and little or no heel raise. If your feet are used to a cushier ride, you might find such shoes uncomfortable unless you recondition your feet.

  7. #7
    Registered User Wags's Avatar
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    i've probably got 500 miles on my current pair of montrail hardrocks
    " It's what people know about themselves inside that makes 'em afraid." ~Clint Eastwood, High Plains Drifter

  8. #8

    Default

    If you really really want camp shoes, consider poking some holes in your insoles, or carry a spare pair of insoles for this purpose, and then threading a shoe-lace through to make a sandal. Remove the shoe lace to put the insole back in. It's a good idea to have spare shoelaces anyway. Another option is to use a bit of blue foam pad and some duct tape to make sandals. Carrying two pairs of fully functional shoes kind of isn't really Ultralight and camp shoes really aren't necessary unless you are doing some kind of river hike and will have permanently wet shoes or something like that.
    Some knew me as Piper, others as just Diane.
    I hiked the PCT: Mexico to Mt. Shasta, 2008. Santa Barbara to Canada, 2009.

  9. #9

    Default

    I use Sanuks for Campshoes. Light as flip flops, but secure on yer foot and comfy.

    They fit in the side open pocket on my pack and weigh next to nothing.

  10. #10

    Default

    Every shoe company has their own "fit". Find one that fits you best and forget about the name. New Balance doesn't cut it for me. My forefoot is too wide, my heel is too narrow, and I don't have any arch to speak of nor do my feet have much volume. Do some study on types of feet, determine which type is closest to yours, and start shopping.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11

    Default

    Every brand fits differently - I'm an ASICS man (size 11.0US slightly wide). Find a brand that fits. Buy it a 1/2 size big.

    For ASICS, I found the Kahana 3 to be the best. I tried 4 other models on 2 thru's (including some expensive models). The Kahana has a toe rand that enables the shoe to last >700miles. They dry quickly and have good traction.

  12. #12
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    Default New Balance

    Footware is the most varied and contentious topic among hikers.. Okay food maybe the most contentious!
    Anyhow you asked about New Balance. I used 12 pairs of New Balance shoes to hike the PCT and CDT. I used the cheapest style they had(NB 476 & 479), not totally because they were cheap, just cause they fit the best. My feet never changed shape like some do on the trail. I liked and needed the extra width of EEEE that New Balance offers. As far as water resistant.. IMHO forget it. After hiking through snow and streams with abandon I found the choice of sock to be more important than the shoes ability to resist water.
    For example: In the Sierra on top of snow pack for a week and a half and crossing streams I would just let my feet get wet. Sometime throughout the day I would change my Smartwool socks, hanging the wet pair on the pack. Even if they don't totally dry just slinging them around a bit restores some of their cushioning qualities.
    Anyhow I am getting off topic. As far as New Balance I can recommend them myself.. That they worked well for me anyways. And the way i made them work well in wet conditions was sock strategy.
    Headed in to town.. You gotta rock the down! -fellow hikers mantra

  13. #13
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    Default Superfeet

    I wanted to add that I always put superfeet insoles in my cheap New Balance shoes. One outfitter I met (Shortt supply Hood River Oregon) said :" Youv'e turned a thirty dollar pair of shoes into a 90 dollar pair by adding those insoles".
    On the CDT '10 I learned to just put the superfeet in on top of the stock insole that comes in the shoe. The extra cushion meant absolutely no foot pain like I had after the PCT in '09.
    Crikey! I am sorry. I am going off about everything foot related. Anyhow HYOH, Your Mileage may very.. all that.
    Cheers
    Headed in to town.. You gotta rock the down! -fellow hikers mantra

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by frisbeefreek View Post
    Every brand fits differently - I'm an ASICS man (size 11.0US slightly wide). Find a brand that fits. Buy it a 1/2 size big.

    For ASICS, I found the Kahana 3 to be the best. I tried 4 other models on 2 thru's (including some expensive models). The Kahana has a toe rand that enables the shoe to last >700miles. They dry quickly and have good traction.
    I'm a bit curious to know whether or not you noticed my post.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  15. #15

    Default

    My fave is INOV8. I highly recommend these!
    Do not change out the insoles to superfeet, the original insole cups the the foot and is very comfortable as is.
    These are great for strong ankles:
    http://www.gearandtraining.com/gearn...&dept_id=14800

    These are great for me for ankle support:
    http://www.gearandtraining.com/gearn...&dept_id=14800

    Yes 315 and 390 are the weight in grams which tells you how light they are.

  16. #16

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    I bought some $30 new balance 400 series and I think they fit and feel best, too. They do tend to hold on to water more than other models with other fabrics. Other than that, I can see no reason for the difference in price.
    Some knew me as Piper, others as just Diane.
    I hiked the PCT: Mexico to Mt. Shasta, 2008. Santa Barbara to Canada, 2009.

  17. #17
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
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    I've been through a few pairs of the 390s and really like them.

    I liked the non-goretex version, the 370, even better but they quit making it. When the 390s get wet, they stay wet for a while.


    Quote Originally Posted by GADGETEER View Post
    My fave is INOV8. I highly recommend these!
    Do not change out the insoles to superfeet, the original insole cups the the foot and is very comfortable as is.
    These are great for strong ankles:
    http://www.gearandtraining.com/gearn...&dept_id=14800

    These are great for me for ankle support:
    http://www.gearandtraining.com/gearn...&dept_id=14800

    Yes 315 and 390 are the weight in grams which tells you how light they are.

  18. #18

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    Although I'm not one of them, many hikers DO wear camp shoes.
    I sell a lot of these (at 3 oz/pair for the size XL): http://theunderwearguys.com/product_...roducts_id=218
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  19. #19

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    Oh forgot to mention, mention "whiteblaze" and we'll give you $4 back (will give you a refund after we receive your order as you will be asked to pay $8 shipping fee) on the above camp shoes.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  20. #20

    Default

    well i love a business that loves us !

    just orderred two pair i'll give'em a try

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