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  1. #1
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    10-16-2010
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    Default early march start(snowshoes?)

    A combination things may move my start to the first week in march. Is anyone starting then? Are you bringing snowshows? The snow is pretty deep up here (massachusetts) Next week I'm going to do a mini shakedown in n.h. and I am definitely bringing them there.Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    04-15-2010
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    Default early birds

    I did the first nobo section in mid February. It was slow going where there were unmelted snow drifts, but making good progress was generally not a problem. I was wearing light goretex boots and did not have snowshoes.

  3. #3

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    Man, the way this winter is going, no way can you judge by the past. There could be a chance snowshoes will be helpful in the Smokies, but not before there.

    If your coming up to NH, definately bring your snowshoes or your not going anywhere. While we haven't gotten quite as much snow here as towards the coast and down state, we still have a lot!

    I read a perdiction on accuweather.com which says the type of winter we're having now will be the norm for the next few years, similer to the type of winters we had in the late 60's and early 70's. March starts might be a thing of the past until the cycle changes again...
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I suggest that you don't bring snowshoes. I agree with Slo-go'en that the Smokies are the place they could potentially be helpful, at least based on last year, but as he also says, no way to be sure.

    My personal attitude, and I think this might be common among thru-hikers on all three of the major trails (?) is that anytime snowshoes are really and truly needed, that's the signal that I should either take a bit of time off trail or flip to some other part of the trail, where I can do decent daily mileage. (or roadwalk around a bit as everyone was doing just past Clingman's dome when I was going through in March of last year). Snowshoeing is relatively slow, so if you have to do much of it --- well, IMO best not to do much (or any) of it on the thru-hike.

    It's amazing how much snow a person can deal with in just shoes; I used trail runners throughout, using Yaktraks a handful of times for icy conditions in Feb/March.
    Gadget
    PCT: 2008 NOBO, AT: 2010 NOBO, CDT: 2011 SOBO, PNT: 2014+2016

  5. #5

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    We hiked from Rock Gap to Dicks Crrek Gap early March of last year..We were on ice most of the trip and in 3 ft snow going over standing Indian...we had ice cleats which worked fine..Never needed snow shoes..We have changed toKahoola mictospike for our thruhike this year...i agree with previous post that if snow shoe are the only way through the Smokies you probably should go round or wait..

  6. #6

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    This is an interesting subject. On my last two trips of about 28 days, I definitely needed snowshoes between 3,500 and 5.300 feet. Did I bring any? Heck no. Who carries snowshoes in the Southeast? Will I bring any on my next long trip? Nope.

  7. #7
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    10-16-2010
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    lynnfield, massachusetts
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    Default

    Sorry, I have been on roofs with 24 to 72 inches of snow(drifts)without them for the last week. Bad safety problem up in New England.Haven't spent much time down south since 70and 71.

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