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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Highland Goat View Post
    I have used both vacuum-sealed bags and zip-top freezer bags for diverse trips of various durations and found that the best choice depends on the contents. Some freeze-dried foods have monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats that can oxidize easily, that is to say go rancid. I try to choose my storage method based on the ingredients list.
    Yup. The other aspect that comes into play is how long dehydrated food is going to be sitting around before being used. It's why some people write on the bags, whether Ziplocks or Vacuum sealed, the date made, contents and possibly prep instructions.


    I mostly Ziploc dehydrated food placing a leftover anti-dessicant packet inside( I save mine from vitamin bottles), seal it well after squeezing as much air out, roll it up and then place a small rubber band around it. I store it already divided up into dinners, b'fasts, and snacks into covered sealed plastic bins off the floor on shelves in an area not prone to temp, humidity, and insect extremes. This makes for easier food supply/resupply for this impromptu backpacking treks.

    All Ziplock are not equal. Some have better seals, thicker mils, etc than other versions. Sometime the word Ziplocks is used to describe any plastic bag with a top seal.

    Two of the most noted problems I had in contamination and lowered shelf life were 1) Poor sealing because messy filling of the Ziplocs. Do not get food, even food dust, oils(from nuts seeds, etc), spices, etc in the seals 2) Using too thin Dollar Store or Great Value Wally World "Ziploc" brands of bags for pints food. Crumbing up something like higher end Ramen can easily poke small holes in the bag.


    I typically get 10-14 months doing this with all my food whether dehydrated or not.


    One more thing that has assisted in less waste. Everything I eat on trail I readily eat at home so if I start seeing expiration dates of "trail food" nearing I use that first on trail and at home.

  2. #22

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    Using too thin Dollar Store or Great Value Wally World "Ziploc" brands of bags for pointy food.

    Attempting to overstuff Ziplocs also makes them prone to the seals being opened spoiling the contents. Again thin cheap brands of off brand Ziplocs when maxing out volume and then rolling and rubber banding the seams can blow out in small lengths not always easily reco
    gnized. I prefer reducing food bulk using Ziplocs as described rather than the vaccuum sealing bags. If I was to eat in the bag hot meals in the Ziploc I don't suggest one uses the thinnest bags that are also prone to seam failure.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    One reason why I tend to vacuum seal rather than Ziplocks is, that vacuum keeps all the smells inside, while Ziplocks let some vapors leak out.
    Not a technical problem at all, but a storage box full of Ziplocks spreads a tasty smell, while vacuum bags are almost smell-free (at least to humans - don't ask rodents)
    Are your vacuum seal bags ant proof? If you use the thick mil mylar bags, the ants might not be able to chew through them.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    Are your vacuum seal bags ant proof? If you use the thick mil mylar bags, the ants might not be able to chew through them.
    On our most recent desert trip we brought a couple of ziplock stored stuff, and we took extra care to keep them out of the reach of ants.
    Last year (and many years before) we hat loads of factory made dried food (Travellunch) that are not vacuum sealed, but made of extra heavy duty and very special material weld-sealed plastic bags the ants couldn't chew through.
    So yes, heavy-duty weld-sealed bags are ants-proof!

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    On our most recent desert trip we brought a couple of ziplock stored stuff, and we took extra care to keep them out of the reach of ants.
    Last year (and many years before) we hat loads of factory made dried food (Travellunch) that are not vacuum sealed, but made of extra heavy duty and very special material weld-sealed plastic bags the ants couldn't chew through.
    So yes, heavy-duty weld-sealed bags are ants-proof!
    That's awesome. I've been using a mylar bag with a unique closure system that is smell proof and child proof if that has any merit. Put candy in it and the little ones won't be able to get their little hands on the stash. I purchase Mountain House freeze dried food in #10 cans and transfer the entire contents into the mylar bag. The bottom of the bag expands with a 3 inch gusset. The gusset allows the bag to stand upright while filling and dispensing food. At meal time I open the bag and use my 1 cup mug to dip out 1 cup ingredients and add that to a 1 quart ziploc. I add 2 cups hot water to that and set aside to rehydrate or I pour directly into my pot of boiling water and let sit for 5 min.

    The bags are heat welded on 2 sides and the top sliding closure is high tech making it smell proof. The smell proof thing has worth in our world of bears and other critters that have high tech noses :-) They are child proof also due to the closure design thingy. I would think they are insect proof for sure.







    Last edited by zelph; 12-13-2018 at 10:58.

  6. #26

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    Sarah has the answers:

    http://www.trailcooking.com/trail-co...g-cooking-101/

    Great site, great book!
    "Adam & Eve are the first two persons who failed to read the Apple Permissions & Exclusions."

  7. #27

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    ATTENTION......ATTENTION......ATTENTION



    I followed your link and a warning screen opened that looks like this:

    .
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by zelph; 12-19-2018 at 00:10.

  8. #28

  9. #29
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    I have bought the #10 cans and reportioned them as well. You can use mylar bags (with an oxygen absorber) or vacuum sealed bags for longer term storage but a quart sized ziplock freezer bag works well IMPE (I haven't tried longer than that myself.) On the trail I just add water, stuff it in a homemade reflectix pouch, wait, and eat. The easy clean up is awesome too.
    Last edited by Jayne; 12-19-2018 at 18:07.

  10. #30

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    Sounds like you have some malware in your PC. Try the free version of this app and clean out your machine:

    https://www.spybot-free-download.com/

    Update it before you run it.

    No...I don't make any money off of this. It's just a good program.
    "Adam & Eve are the first two persons who failed to read the Apple Permissions & Exclusions."

  11. #31

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    Thank you. I downloaded it and it's scanning now. Going really slow and looks like it will take hours to complete.

  12. #32
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    There's something about the site that is triggering that warning, it's not malware. I am using a corporate pc with very high level firewall, and it displays that warning when I click on the link, which means there is an intrinsic security issue on the site (it may not subject you to malware, but it is possible through a security setting there). It's very unlikely I could have malware undetected. I've visited that site in the past multiple times with no problem on the same PC/network, so something has likely changed.

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by chef4 View Post
    There's something about the site that is triggering that warning, it's not malware. I am using a corporate pc with very high level firewall, and it displays that warning when I click on the link, which means there is an intrinsic security issue on the site (it may not subject you to malware, but it is possible through a security setting there). It's very unlikely I could have malware undetected. I've visited that site in the past multiple times with no problem on the same PC/network, so something has likely changed.
    Thank you "chef4" for verifying my findings.

    I clicked on the link again today and the same red notice pops up on my screen.
    Last edited by zelph; 01-06-2019 at 16:57.

  14. #34
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    Default deceptive site warning

    I think I figured it out, this appears to be a google Chrome feature; when I used a different browser it didn't come up, so it may not be the security of the network, but a browser feature (which apparently can be disabled, but you wouldn't want to do that unless you have excellent antivirus, etc). Chrome thinks there's a potential problem on that site.
    Last edited by chef4; 01-06-2019 at 18:20. Reason: add something

  15. #35
    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    My Norton AV says 3 threats- 2 fake tech support sites and one phishing site https://www.test.trailcooking.com. Basically drive by malware and a phishing script

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossup View Post
    My Norton AV says 3 threats- 2 fake tech support sites and one phishing site https://www.test.trailcooking.com. Basically drive by malware and a phishing script
    wow, that's impressive software to be able to pick that info out....thank you!

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    Thank you. I downloaded it and it's scanning now. Going really slow and looks like it will take hours to complete.
    The first time you run Spybot, it takes about 1 hour+, subsequent runs take about 30 minutes on my 500 G HD. When it is done, run the "Immuniztion" option to protect your PC from further incursions. It's not 100% effective, but nothing ever is.

    Every time Mr. Gates sends out the monthly updates for Win 10, I have to run Spybot, followed by Wise Disk Cleaner and Registry Cleaner, (also freebies), to get my PC running smoothly again.

    You will be amazed at the amount of junk most websites sneak into your OS. The disk cleaner app usually cleans over 1 G of cookies, etc., when I run it. But the record is 32 G of junk he program eliminated on my WIN 10 HP laptop after the January 2019 update was installed. I have found that running the diagnostic cleaning apps every week is the best option.

    An occasional disk de-frag doesn't hurt, either.
    Last edited by atraildreamer; 01-21-2019 at 12:08.
    "Adam & Eve are the first two persons who failed to read the Apple Permissions & Exclusions."

  18. #38

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    Every time Mr. Gates sends out the monthly updates for Win 10, I have to run Spybot, followed by Wise Disk Cleaner and Registry Cleaner, (also freebies), to get my PC running smoothly again.
    I got fed up with Mr. Gates and bought a Chrome Book in hopes of simplifying my life. I have been using Gmail and Chrome browser so I went all the way with Chromebook. I now feel "coordinated" LOL Just startred using the Book yesterday.

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    I got fed up with Mr. Gates and bought a Chrome Book in hopes of simplifying my life. I have been using Gmail and Chrome browser so I went all the way with Chromebook. I now feel "coordinated" LOL Just startred using the Book yesterday.
    Anything connected with Google, especially Chrome, is designed to track your browsing habits, buying preferences, etc. I use Firefox on my Win 10 machine, and the Brave privacy browser on an Android tablet and it drives me crazy to have to sign in to Google when I want to download an app. I try to stick to apps where I can get a direct download without a sign in. The less info Google has about my browsing habits, the better! After a while, there is so much junk loaded in the background of the tablet that I just reset it to the factory new condition and start over again.
    Last edited by atraildreamer; 01-18-2019 at 22:20.
    "Adam & Eve are the first two persons who failed to read the Apple Permissions & Exclusions."

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by atraildreamer View Post
    Anything connected with Google, especially Chrome, is designed to track your browsing habits, buying preferences, etc. I use Firefox on my Win 10 machine, and the Brave privacy browser on an Android tablet and it drives me crazy to have to sign in to Google when I want to download an app. I try to stick to apps where I can get a direct download without a sign in. The less info Google has about my browsing habits, the better! After a while, there is so much junk loaded in the background of the tablet that I just reset it to the factory new condition and start over again.

    Yup.

    Few things are free

    Most free software, apps, is glorified spyware.

    Thats what facebook is, thats what google is.
    Make money by collecting user data and selling it

    Even search engine results.....depend on who pays to be put at top of result list

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