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  1. #1

    Default Anyone training for their hike?

    Anyone else doing any special training before they leave for the AT? I have talked to a friend of mine who runs track at Marist, and she told me that the kids wow run long distance dont weight train at all, and they just run 5-6 days a week, totaling around 60 miles a week. since I'm leaving June 1st I figure I can get myself to that number by that time. I'm starting by running 5 days a week, totaling around 25 miles a week, ad building up to the 50-60 mile a week range. I'll also be mixing in a bunch of push ups and sit ups, to built over all strength. I offer this as "one mans opinion" and I am eager to hear what other '05 ers are doing to prepare. I also have planned some weekend hikes (3 days and 2 nites) to prepare as well. Can't wait to hear some responces....gnite!
    Maine2Georgia.com
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  2. #2
    Jay, Class of 2005 MoBeach42's Avatar
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    Default training? well, kindof...

    My philosophy is that I don't need to be ready to do 15 or 20 miles right out of the gate in GA, but be in a place from which to build the strength to do that. As long as I can happily do the approach trail and do a couple more miles the next day, I think I'll be happy.

    My training program is simple: go about daily life with more weight attached to yourself. I've been walking to work - about 3 miles each way, with increasing weight in my back pack (I'm still only using my day pack, but I've gotten around 15-20 lbs in it depending on the size of my lunch). I'm doing a bunch of day hikes up in NH with some pack weight. I'm not doing any winter camping, but I climbed both Mousilake and Cannon last weekend. I'm hoping to do some more of that before march.

    Thoughts, comments? What's everybody else doing?
    Journal * Photos
    "The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know.... Do justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough." -John Adams

  3. #3

    Default

    First of all, I am not an avid weight lifter, but in training for this hike I have been hitting the weights at the Y, both upper and lower body. I figure having stronger thighs, hamstrings, shoulders, etc. can't hurt to start with.

    I have also been running - I participated in a half-marathon at Halloween and several 10ks since. My philospohy here is that I need to "beat up" my joints a little bit and get them prepared for the shock they will receive when I begin.

    Lastly, I have gone backpacking once a month with a fully loaded pack (even though it was only for the weekend). I have used Coosa Backcountry Trail in GA as my training run - I like it because it mimics the AT but it isn't the AT.

    I figure nothing can actually prepare you for a thru-hike, but weights, running, and actual hiking can at least begin the transition to hiking shape. I'm not going to just sit around and "hope" that I can make it...

    dave

  4. #4

    Default

    Its a pretty simple formula.

    Lift,Run,Lift,Run,Lift,Run,Lift,Run

    etc......

    Semper Fi

  5. #5
    Registered User gravityman's Avatar
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    Default No more than 10% more mileage each week...

    Quote Originally Posted by UCONNMike
    Anyone else doing any special training before they leave for the AT? I have talked to a friend of mine who runs track at Marist, and she told me that the kids wow run long distance dont weight train at all, and they just run 5-6 days a week, totaling around 60 miles a week. since I'm leaving June 1st I figure I can get myself to that number by that time. I'm starting by running 5 days a week, totaling around 25 miles a week, ad building up to the 50-60 mile a week range. I'll also be mixing in a bunch of push ups and sit ups, to built over all strength. I offer this as "one mans opinion" and I am eager to hear what other '05 ers are doing to prepare. I also have planned some weekend hikes (3 days and 2 nites) to prepare as well. Can't wait to hear some responces....gnite!
    Careful. You don't want to injure yourself. The rule of thumb for marathoners is not to add more than 10% per week to the total mileage of that week. If you aren't a runner currently, I would suggest taking a look at hal higdon's beginner's marathon training program as a good place to start. It takes about 4 months to work up to the marathon. Also has good advice about step back weeks : http://www.halhigdon.com/marathon/Mar00novice.htm

    We are training, although not nearly as much as we wanted to be at this point. Trying to prepare to leave work for 10 months is taking a lot more time and energy than I expected it would.

    One piece of advice is hike with you full pack on. We trained for the Long Trail this summer, but did it with a much lighter pack, and the full weight of the backpack really hit us hard when we started.

    Gravity

  6. #6
    Livin' life in the drive thru! hikerjohnd's Avatar
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    Default Training

    I've been reading about what others advise and so forth so I took each bit of wisdom and designed my own plan. I started just walking around the neighborhood and added to that. I bought a pack just like the one I plan to start with off of ebay and loaded it with weight (I didn't want to wear out my pack prematurely) and have been walking around my neighborhood. Additionally, I bought a treadmill and set it to an 8% incline and walk 1-2 miles a day uphill. I figure between walking around the neighborhood and on the incline, I'll be ready for the mountains!

  7. #7
    Registered User Capt Chaos's Avatar
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    Default

    Wildcat(2004 AT Thru Hiker) and I have been walking up and down steps outside of our local Hospital. There is something like 120 of them in one flight. We have packed day packs with about 40 pounds(overload) and walked for about an hour. We do this various times throughout the week and then go backpacking on the weekends. It is a great workout and gives us something to do. I decided not to run because of the stress it puts onto your knees. Another things is actually walking with your pack simulates the same form of muscle activity that you will experience on the trail.

    Thats just my .02 cents worth.
    "After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality, and so on—have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently wear—what remains? Nature remains." -Walt Whitman

    Captain Chaos
    http://www.trailjournals.com/captainchaos/

  8. #8
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    Default pre hike training regime...

    It sounds that most of the dreamers are doing some sort of training. I moved to Tennessee several months ago with visions of training and planning. Since then, I have scrapped any such training. Any training I've done has been just hiking. So I'll just be sore and tired until I am better conditioned. I'll likely be the guy taking many breaks within the first few days. But to me, its not going to be a race.

    I am getting anxious to get started. Will be a late Feb or early March NOBO start.

    All you NOBO thru-hikers planning to hike the approach trail, and not wanting to hike the entire 8.8 miles, the Len Foote hikers inn is a nice stop on the way to Springer. Its a blue blaze to get there on the BMC but will break up the hike. They serve a meal and you can shower.

    Happy Trails,
    TDS

  9. #9

    Default

    My husband and I have been going out twice a week with a training rucksack filled with rocks. It weighs about 15 kilo (45 pounds). It was hard at first, but it's getting easier to take. We won't have nearly that weight in our "real" rucksacks.

    Where we hike here in Clevedon, UK, is a combo of steep hill, and steep decline, and some flat (and loads of lovely English MUD). It's a lot easier than when I first took it out a month ago...but it's still an unforviging weight! Rocks suck for training, but the water bottles kept leaking...

  10. #10
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    Default

    Howdy all,
    I got a membership at the local gym. I initially have been doing weight training and cardiovascular work. I am preparing to enter the pre-long a**ed walk training. Which is going to be me strapping on my pack, with every damn thing I am taking, then walking on the treadmill with a 50% incline. I figure getting used to going up hill will be the bitch. On the downhill I reckon gravity and balance will get me along.
    If that does not work I figure giving myself plenty of time on the trail itself will whip my a** into shape.
    Rob
    I swear -- by my life and my love of it -- that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

  11. #11
    2006 Thru-hiker in planning willyhort0w2's Avatar
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    Default prep for thruer

    However i am not hiking until 06 I am laid off work so I have been hiking in about 12-14 inches of snow with a 20 lb daypack on. Me and my dog

  12. #12

    Default

    this web-site is great that you gave a link to, im on week one, and feeling great, i signed up at teh local ymca, and i cant wait to see teh results 18 weeks from now
    i feel liek this will give me an advantage as far as my endurance levels.
    Maine2Georgia.com
    A Southbound Adventure


  13. #13

    Default

    I've been running about 6 to 9 miles per week with plenty of stretches and crunches. Recently added climbing/decending 10 flights of stairs at a brisk pace. Have completed several long (12+ mile) hikes with a full pack. Need one more cold weather shakedown backpacking trip between now and a 3/6 start date. Can't wait!
    --Bob from Raleigh

  14. #14
    avatar= bushwhackin' mount kancamagus nh 5-8-04 neighbor dave's Avatar
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    :banana workin' out????

    i'm doin' as many 12 ounce curls as i can stand!
    plus hikin' every weekend!

  15. #15
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    Default

    I ain't doin' nothin!!! ...hope to start walking or running a few weeks before I leave (which is drawing NEAR!). But I figure I'll just take it slow for the first week or so of hiking if I have to. Who else out there is a slacker ? (ha ha)

  16. #16

    Default Training for my section hike that's 2 - 6 weeks from now...

    I walked 5 miles 3 days ago, 5.5 miles yesterday, took today off (partly due to work overload), and will do between 4 and 6 miles tomorrow, depending upon how the old bod feels. I'm walking on variably but gently sloping rural dirt roads that are often quite muddy in parts. I walk relatively slow for the 1st 20 minutes, and am moving along at a pretty good clip by the last half of the day's walk. As soon as I get to a thrift store, I'm going to start wearing a pack that I put 20 or 30 pounds of rocks in to partially simulate a hiking pack load.

  17. #17

    Default What I'm doing for my upcoming section hike 2- 6 weeks away...

    I walked 5 miles day before yesterday, and 5.5 miles yesterday. Tomorrow I'll walk between 4 - 6 mils, depending on how the old bod tells me it's doing halfway through. I'm walking in heavy boots on variably but gently sloping rural dirt roads that are often quite muddy in parts. As soon as I remember to go by a thrift store, I'll pick up an old rucksack/schoolboy's backpack, and put 20 - 30 pounds of bricks in it to partially simulate carrying a hiker's pack.

    Oh, nthadley; according to the AT books I have, if you don't train before through-hiking, you can expect to have lousy mileage (and more aches and pains in general) for an average of the first month of your through-hike, even if your body weight is where it's supposed to be and your pack weight is reasonable. It won't be just one week that you'll be taking it easy compared to your fellow hikers (WRT daily mileage, not WRT how you'll feel).

  18. #18
    GAVA '04; GAME '05
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    Default

    Having done some of the AT before and knowing what it's like, to train for my upcoming hike, once a day I'm having my brother punch me in the stomach then throw me in a snow bank. It's the closest replication I've found so far.

  19. #19

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    I am going up a local trail as many days a week as I can with 26 lbs in my pack. The hill is about 2000 ft. and 3.5 miles round trip. Today I snowshoed up in the new snow and storm. With the wind I think it was the coldest day all winter for my hike. I joined a gym in Sept and never went. Planned on losing weight and doing a lot more but didn't so I guess I will just start slow, very slow.

  20. #20
    Registered User
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    Default

    i bet she likes fried SPAM sandwiches

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