Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-25-2011
    Location
    Brigantine, NJ
    Posts
    12

    Default Best hiking boot?

    Hey all,

    I'm wondering if anyone has a recommendation for a pair of hiking boots?
    Or any boots to stay away from...
    Or and specs that I should particularly look out for?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    Footwear gets to be very personal, and one of your most important decisions. My ankles are weak, been turned, twisted and sprained too many times, I definitely need boots with good ankle support. Many do well with trail runners, some even to flip-flops, gators and barefoot. Find you a good hiking outfitter, find the best knowledgeable person there (frequently the owner) who is willing to spend time with you. Discuss what you need, get fitted properly, get the complete break-in recommendations from him/her, and have some very happy feet.

    I bought a pair of Vasque boots and 3 pairs of smartwool socks, nearly 2 months before hitting the trail, and had a pair of very happy feet with no blisters or hot spots at all (I section hike only).

  3. #3
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-14-2005
    Location
    Virginia, 10 miles from the AT near SNP
    Age
    54
    Posts
    10,470
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    171

    Default

    I love my Brooks Adrenaline ASR Trail Runners. They are good for my foot type (I pronate). Boots are not necessary on the AT.







    Hiking Blog
    AT NOBO and SOBO, LT, FHT, ALT
    Shenandoah NP Ridgerunner, Author, Speaker


  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-15-2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    3,949

    Default

    Depends. I agree with theoilman on using a good outfitter. Start trying on the various brands. Make sure you have plenty of toe room and use an incline board to test the fit, especially on the downhill. Consider inserts and adjust them for a good "volume fit". Consider your packs base weights and the boots or trailrunners amount of support.

    My 'go to" boot on my 2009 thru hike was the Keen Targhee II Mid boot. Light, comfy, and never got a blister. The tradeoff was they didn't last long. The soles started to delaminate between 250-300 miles. I did try a pair of Vasque trailrunners and despised them. Vasque products should be banned by Federal law and burned in the nearest incinerator............ hehehehheeee.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
    Registered User Sierra Echo's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-17-2010
    Location
    Buford, Georgia
    Posts
    1,615
    Images
    23

    Default

    I love my Keens. You will too if you have wide feet.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2007
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    1,599
    Images
    36

    Default

    I am as picky as they come, the new Vasque waterproof trail runners are super, hard to beat, I have a WIDE foot so there are a LOT less options. Am done with boots, makes no sense to me, the "ankle support" issue is really a falacy - now ski boots, they have ankle support, low top is the way to go in my view, opinions on waterproof or not varies widely,

  7. #7
    Registered User SassyWindsor's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-19-2007
    Location
    Knightsbridge, London UK
    Posts
    969

    Default No Thanks to China Made Boots

    Some of my friends, who do a lot of travel in hiking boots, tell me the results of quality, non-China made hiking boots, have now been downgraded to junk status when made in China. I wear European, mostly Italian made boots. Fabiano(no longer made) or "High End, all leather" Scarpa boots are very high quality and perform better than any other footwear I've owned. I do own footwear made in China, but I never get too far away that I couldn't walk home bear-footed if I had to. I would never backpack in them.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-28-2011
    Location
    Starkville Ms
    Age
    64
    Posts
    314

    Default

    I recently switched from Keen Targhee mid height boots to Patagonia Drifter trail shoes. I have had problems in the past with my ankles rolling over easily so I was a little nervous about switching! I have to say I loved these new shoes! I did 40 miles on the AT in 4 days and never had a blister or a problem with my ankles! These aren't the lightest trail shoes on the market, but the soles provided great protection from sharp rocks encountered on the trail! I give them a five star rating! :]

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-21-2011
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Age
    30
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I love the La Sportiva FC eco series. They come in different heights. I like the 3.0 Eco.

  10. #10
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-23-2008
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Age
    50
    Posts
    2,850
    Images
    7

    Default

    The best hiking boots (excepting deep snow) are SHOES - check out La Sportiva trail runners

  11. #11
    Registered User 4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    Rhome, TX / Monroe, NH
    Age
    61
    Posts
    7,280
    Images
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reilly View Post
    Hey all,

    I'm wondering if anyone has a recommendation for a pair of hiking boots?
    Or any boots to stay away from...
    Or and specs that I should particularly look out for?

    Thanks!
    For a thru-hike? For sectioning? Only on the AT? What seasons will you wear them?

    Most (not all) prefer low cut hiking shoes these days for thru-hikes and three season use. If you're hiking all four seasons a mid height boot is nice in the winter for warmth and snow / water repellency IMO. Others will disagree. YMMV.

    While not the lightest, I like LLBeans Trail Model II hiker shoe for price / quality / guaranty. $59.99 (79.99 in goretex) and one of the best soles in terms of traction I've seen. The downside is the insoles could be more comfortable and of higher quality - an easy fix with custom insoles. The outer soles have better grip than my current "vibram" Vasque Breeze low cuts or Asolo mid heights, both of which are good footwear IMO.

  12. #12
    Working on Forestry Grad schol
    Join Date
    01-21-2005
    Location
    Blacksburg, VA
    Age
    33
    Posts
    1,455

    Default

    I'd start at a high-quality running store. They'll have an order of magnitude more shoe choices than any outfitter and will likely know far more about active footwear than any other resource you'll get to.

  13. #13
    Registered User sailsET's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-15-2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    66
    Images
    8

    Default

    Another vote for Keens. Very comfortable with little break-in time. Good for wide feet. Make sure you get them big enough. I'm told your feet can swell while hiking, but didn't personally notice that. Have someone help you with fitting. The ones that were recommended to me were a full size larger than my usual shoe size. I purchased them at REI, where the staff are knowledgeable about fitting, - they measured and used an incline board. They did well on slippery surfaces, and gave good support; only had one incidence of "operator error" on the trail. I had very happy feet on my first hike!

  14. #14
    Registered User sloger's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-05-2011
    Location
    Southcentral PA and proud of it
    Age
    77
    Posts
    48
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default New boots

    I drove 60 miles to the Mountain Trails store in Winchester VA so I could try differnt boots, with the excellent advice of the staff there I ended up with Vasque Breeze boots -- excelent advice and choice. Thier prices were competive with REI and Campmor. Sloger

  15. #15
    Registered User Nutbrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-05-2011
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    531
    Images
    3

    Default

    I bought Asolo Stinger GTX, and they tore my feet up. They are fine if you need a stiff boot, but were too hard for my feet.

  16. #16
    Hike smarter, not harder.
    Join Date
    10-01-2008
    Location
    Midland, TX
    Age
    59
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    Trail runners unless you need ankle support. And you'll always get more ankle support with a trail runner and a real ankle brace than a boot.
    Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe - Thomas Sowell

  17. #17

    Default

    The best boots are the ones that fit you properly. Some people can get by with trail runners. I tried a couple of different kinds of trail runners, but alas, I ended up with lots blisters and really sore feet. (And I don't really care a lot of weight.) I went back to using boots.

    I also have wide feet, and I found that I need to buy men's boots to get the proper fit. Ladies boots simply don't fit me well. If you do buy boots, especially leather boots, be sure to break them in by wearing them around town before you hit the trail.

    Good luck!
    Some people take the straight and narrow. Others the road less traveled. I just cut through the woods.

  18. #18
    Pre Planning 2012 Thru Hike Switchback2012's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-27-2010
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
    Age
    45
    Posts
    15
    Images
    7

    Default

    I plan on starting out in my Asolo GTX but switch to Montrail trail runners when the weather warms up. I love both for different reasons. I agree with other posts - you need to find what fits you and a knowledgable outfitter to help you. Be wary of an outfitter that just wants to show you the most expensive pair. My first pair were Hi-Tec and they were great for section hiking. I wore them until the soles began to seperate from the shoe. Not sure I would consider them for a thru - hike but I was pleased with them and they were in economical.

    "Do, or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2007
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    1,599
    Images
    36

    Default

    Ankle support...............bull honkey!

    Low tops, comfy, solid support, strong tread to ease the rocks

    I am 52 and 230lbs (and dropping - recent case of giardia from NH hike helped!), plus a 30lb full pack = potential trouble, what I have learned, go light, low tops, poles.

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-07-2010
    Location
    Northeast TX
    Age
    62
    Posts
    51

    Default

    I agree with what many have said about individual fit; just like buying a backpack. Having said that, I've had good luck with Salomon and La Sportiva trail runners. Started with a pair of Lowe Renegade boots, and they're great boots, but quickly switched to TRs
    Good luck

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •