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  1. #21
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    Hoka One One (pronounced oh-ney, oh-ney) trail shoes are a big thing among the ultra running cult. The have EVA mid-soles and lots of cushion. I wouldn't be surprised if they don't start creeping into the hiker community next year.

    Here's a probably totally biased review of the shoe. Interesting the creators came from Saloman

    Heard it here first!

    CITA.jpg
    Last edited by Spokes; 10-07-2011 at 17:31.

  2. #22
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    I wore hedgehogs on my thru-hike (Hedgehog's gortex) and not a single blister. Most, if not all hikers wearing runners were extremely me happy with them. Not the same for hikers wearing boots.

  3. #23
    Registered User SassyWindsor's Avatar
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    It never fails to amaze me how someone can start a multi-day hike, much less a thru-hike, and not know what footwear is best for them. This learned by day or weekend hikes, in other words: short trips. I guess this is one of the main reasons REI has so many footwear returns and many scratch/dent sales.

  4. #24
    Git Bear rdaviskiwi's Avatar
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    I am preparing for a thru in march. I have been hiking with a full pack. I have been wearing a pair of vasque boots that was not cheap but have had a couple years but have not worn much. I have got blisters each hike I wore the boots then I went to a pair of merrell's that I had and went more miles than with boots and no blisters. Guess what I will be wearing in march. People should really test their gear, shoes and themselves before they actually leave on a thru hike. I know I am trying to test and prepare as much as I can.

  5. #25
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    Lighter and fairly fit people do better in trail runners. People that want a lot of "support" which I think is way overrated prefer boots. I wear trail runners until the snow is way too deep for them - and sometimes even when it is.

  6. #26

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    Trail runners are optimal if:

    you pack weight is relatively light (less than 30 all in)
    you have good ankles
    you are reasonably fit

    Boots are necessary if hiking in winter or if the above criteria are not met.

  7. #27
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    If you like The North Face Hedgehogs, check out the Crestone, I tried both, liked the lacing system better in the Crestone but I liked and would wear either. Also you can find them cheaper than REI if you shop around, I paid $67 for a pair of non-goretex, low tops recently.

    I do not believe in the boots = ankle support theory. I think that is a complete myth unless you are talking about really heavy, really high, mountaineering style. For any kind of hiking or backpacking boot, put your boot on, lace it up and then put weight on the side of your foot. Is that thing really going to stop your ankle from rolling? I have had several heavy leather hunting and hiking boots, most recently a 4300 pair of Zamberlan backpacking boots (not the typical REI kind, special order, heavy duty suckers) and I get no real ankle support from them. I have done this same experiment with about 20 pairs of high end backpacking boots from various Italian brands, Kennertrek, Hanwag, Asolo, etc and I see no real ankle support. I think that myth comes from the feeling of a high cut boot hugging your ankle, it makes you feel like it gives you ankle support in a way but your ankle does not stay stationary it moves inside the boot and the boot turns with the off camber pressure. After I switched to trail shoes now I feel like I was more likely to roll an ankle in a boot cause you have that high sole that puts leverage on your ankle.

  8. #28
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    I recently started using a pair of Keen trail shoes and so far so good. I am wondering one thing though .... Is waterproof or more breathable the preferred way to go?

  9. #29
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    Trail runners or low tops that you like..........we walk in low top shoes in our everday life...........less weight, ankle support is questionable with boots, ski boots, now they provide ankle support.

    My preference is low tops, works a lot better for me. I also stopped bringing crocs or flip flops, extra bulk and extra weight.........

  10. #30
    Registered User wwbriggs's Avatar
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    Trail Runners - Merrell Tough Glove, Trail Glove, or Sonic. New Balance Minimus. I have wore New Balance Minimus and Merrell Trail Gloves for hiking and backpacking. Don't see myself going back to boots or regular running shoes. I may wear my Merrell Gortex lightweight boots if it is really muddy and colder, but that is still a maybe as I am going to try to go the trail runners next trip this weekend along the Chattooga River. http://www.runblogger.com/2011/06/me...ove-first.html


    Billie Blazes

  11. #31
    Registered User wwbriggs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TyTy View Post
    I do not believe in the boots = ankle support theory. I think that is a complete myth unless you are talking about really heavy, really high, mountaineering style. For any kind of hiking or backpacking boot, put your boot on, lace it up and then put weight on the side of your foot. Is that thing really going to stop your ankle from rolling?
    I agree. I snapped my ankle and Achilles Tendon in a pair of full leather combat boots when I was in the Army. Boots do not equal ankle support, they do equal more weight and less feel of the trail in most cases. I personally like the feel of the trail as it lets me know when I am about to take something bad on that old injured ankle and I am able to shift my weight to compensate.


    Billie Blazes

  12. #32

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    I be honest with you I absolutely love my Vibram Five Fingers, I wear them for around 25 miles a week on the trail

  13. #33
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    I think the boots = ankle support just comes from the feeling of the leather hugging your ankle but if your boot is stiff enough, high enough, and laced tight enough to provide real stability...you are probably wearing some massive mountaineering boot that is super over kill. Any backpacking, hunting, or combat boot I think only provides a false sense of support.

  14. #34
    Registered User SassyWindsor's Avatar
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    Default Research on foot/ankle injuries vs footwear choice


    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=22522



    The military, UK and USA, have also done research in regards to this question. I, personally, opt for boots when traveling with backpack to lessen plantar pressure and whatever ankle support boots offer. Trail shoes are great when the weight is off and you're not traveling through briers and other obstacles.

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