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Thread: Water pump

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    Default Water pump

    I've done quite a bit of reading and self-experimentation, and have come to the conclusion that I'm gonna start leaving my water filter at home. What I'm looking for now is a lightweight simple way to get water pumped into my bladder. I was thinking if I had a hose with one of those balls (kinda like a boat fuel line with the primer ball) to pump the water into my bladder. Any Ideas?

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    Registered User Northern Lights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird312 View Post
    What I'm looking for now is a lightweight simple way to get water pumped into my bladder. I was thinking if I had a hose with one of those balls (kinda like a boat fuel line with the primer ball) to pump the water into my bladder. Any Ideas?
    Just drink it, it makes it's way to your bladder eventually :P Sorry Couldn't help myself.
    Last edited by Northern Lights; 12-26-2011 at 22:25.

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    haha! thanks for the laugh! My other bladder :P

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    Why do you want to pump it? I just cut the bottom off of a disposable water bottle and use it to scoop water into a bladder. It's light and fairly quick.

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    I've just got used to pumping it in through the tube I suppose. Seems like it would be a pita to take the bladder out of my overstuffed pack to fill it, but thanks for the bottle idea, I've been thinking of how to get the water without my filter.

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    just use your filter

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    The filter is HEAVY, that's why I want to leave it. I've been drinking unfiltered water and read alot of other people drink it unfiltered no problem. If i can find a pump that weighs a couple oz.'s I could pump water into my bladder without removing it from my pack, and as an added bonus, I could easily get water out of little puddles that would be otherwise very hard to retrieve water from.

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    Cut the top off a 20 oz plastic coke bottle and use that for a dipper. Faster than a pump and you get the floaties too. (I hear they're nutritious... )

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    Buy the Sawyer filter by itself. It's 3 ounces with the sports bottle spout and a bladder, so should be closer to 2 ounces with just the bladder. Cut the tube in your current hydration bladder and insert the filter. Now all you have to do is fill your hydration bladder with unfiltered water. Add the bottle 'cup' for maybe another 1/2 ounce, and you have only added maybe 2 1/2 ounces to your system and you have filtered water that you can drink and filter at the same time.

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    is there a difference in colder temps verses warmer temps as far as bacteria?? Like if I'm winter hiking & it's consistantly below freezing, does that kill most or all bacteria & it's safer to not filter? I would assume that the warmer seasons make for much more bacteria??
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    That's what I've been told. Hotter equals more risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird312 View Post
    That's what I've been told. Hotter equals more risk.
    That's my understanding as well hence the invention of refrigerators.

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    The force is strong in you I see.....Your wisdom surpasses all understanding.
    Fortune favors the brave--Virgil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird312 View Post
    The force is strong in you I see.....Your wisdom surpasses all understanding.
    ROTFL That's a great phrase I'm so stealing it.

    We were talking about bacteria growth, bacteria does better in warm temperatures as opposed to cold temperatures http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/how_temperatures_affect_food/index.asp

    T
    his is a basic concept that we've all bought into to as evidenced by the big white boxes in our kitchens.

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    haha, yeah, your comment cracked me up too, I though I'd try to return the favor.

    I've been lugging around a water filter that I use sometimes, and don't use sometimes. I've come to the conclusion that the majority of the water is 100% safe, 99% of the time. I might get some aqua-mira to use if I think I need it.
    Fortune favors the brave--Virgil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird312 View Post
    I've been lugging around a water filter that I use sometimes, and don't use sometimes. I've come to the conclusion that the majority of the water is 100% safe, 99% of the time. I might get some aqua-mira to use if I think I need it.
    Yeah, that's a pretty common sentiment. As for getting water into your pack more easily, I don't know. The Katadyn hiker pro with it's quick connect valve is neat that way but also 11oz. I also suppose you could do something similar to the sawyer gravity filter scheme and leave out the filter so that you've got a water bag that you dump directly into your water bladder via a quick connect, but that doesn't get you the pumping ability that you want.

    I don't know maybe look into the pumps that homebrewers use for siphoning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird312 View Post
    I've just got used to pumping it in through the tube I suppose. Seems like it would be a pita to take the bladder out of my overstuffed pack to fill it, but thanks for the bottle idea, I've been thinking of how to get the water without my filter.
    Pumping water into the bladder, what you were doing before, used the motive force of the filter pump to push the water up and into the bladder. The shaker siphon tube you're talking about doesn't 'pump' anything - it just gets a siphon action going without you have to suck the end of the tube. But remember that all siphon action, except capillary action, requires the receptacle (the bladder) to be lower than the source (spring, stream, lake, puddle, etc.). And if you managed to contort yourself into a position to make it happen, you wouldn't be able to see or stop the alligators from going into the bladder.

    The scooper suggestions are all good, but you're going to have to set your pack down, get the bladder out, and scoop and fill. My thought was to pack one of those plastic cocktail glasses. This would give you a magnified view of what went into the glass before you poured it into the bladder.

    On the subject of waterborne microbes and parasites, those buggers are in the water whether it's hot or cold. Guess what happens when they hit the 98.6F in your stomach? And beaver fever (giardiasis) is endemic in most ponds and streams in the Northeast, and that water stays cold most of the year.

  18. #18

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    We have a simple water system. Used water bottles from the store, I usually carry 2, one for water, one for mixing drinks then a 2 liter platy for drinking while hiking and fill as needed. I usually will carry an extra little bit in my water bottle if I need extra before getting to water sources. Usually gets me enough water for 4-5 miles. All 3 full when its warm. No filter, aquaria for sketch water. Typically don't treat unless Im skeptical. Use the water bottle or my pot to scoop water.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmout View Post
    On the subject of waterborne microbes and parasites, those buggers are in the water whether it's hot or cold. Guess what happens when they hit the 98.6F in your stomach? And beaver fever (giardiasis) is endemic in most ponds and streams in the Northeast, and that water stays cold most of the year.
    Oh if we're talking giardia, cold actually preserves that.

    "How long can Giardia cysts survive in the
    environment?
    The survival of Giardia cysts in the
    environment is significantly affected by
    temperature; survivability decreases as the
    temperature increases. A small fraction of
    cysts can withstand a single freeze-thaw cycle.
    Cysts can survive for 2 to 3 months in water
    temperatures of less than 10 C, and at 21 C,
    cysts have remained viable for almost one
    month. Cysts are killed in 10 minutes at a
    water temperature of 54 C. Raising the water
    temperature to boiling immediately kills cysts."

    http://water.epa.gov/action/advisori..._giardiafs.pdf

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    Just because they're not in the water one day doesn't mean they won't be there the next day. If you are doing the trail, or part of it, any farmland you pass has the potential to wash animal waste into the watershed. And even if you say you are only going to get it from freshwater streams, that is not possible on some parts of the trail. Water filters would allow you to get it out of a puddle if you really had to. You say it's not worth the weight, but it's probably good to have one as a backup. Sell the one you have and buy a Katadyn Hiker Pro - it's the lightest filter available. Here's a review of the Hiker Pro I found. Think about it.

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