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  1. #1
    2012 NOBO AT Hiker In Planning Hairball's Avatar
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    Default Hammock and Sleeping Bag? N00b here.

    I'm new at distance hiking and I was wondering if I can pair a 3 season bag with my new TrekLight double hammock. I don't want to pack and set up a tent every night. I could use the huts/shelters or hang my hammock. Would putting the bag in the hammock be warm enough for a mid March start from Springer? Would it be too warm in June? It seems like a good way to combine gear without carrying too much stuff. I really don't even know if it will work but wanted to ask the experienced crowd in here first. Any advice or comments welcome. Thanks!

    ~Hairball

  2. #2
    Registered User Six-Six's Avatar
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    Your bag will probably be just fine. However, you will probably want to invest in an underquilt. At the very minimum you will need a pad in the sleeve of that double hammock. I assume that double means the same to the Treklight folks as double means to my Warbonnet hammock folks. Usually anything below 70 degrees and you will need something under your bag. At some point lower than that you're going to need the underquilt. don't worry, they are feather light. If you are going to use a shelter now and then, you will put your pad to good use again. You're on the right track - it will all work out. You just need to give it a test run a few times. Check out the sister forum - hammockforums.net
    Everyone's first question:
    "Wow - How tall are you?"
    Answer: "I'm 6'6""
    Ergo, my trail name: 'Six-Six'

  3. #3
    Registered User Six-Six's Avatar
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    This might help too:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9N3K...layer_embedded

    Shug is one of those guys who I would call an 'expert'.
    Everyone's first question:
    "Wow - How tall are you?"
    Answer: "I'm 6'6""
    Ergo, my trail name: 'Six-Six'

  4. #4

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    I just use a 35 degree bag in the summer with my hammock. You can't go very low in temps with just a sleeping bag because when you get it under you and compress the bag against the hammock it loses all of it's warmth. I would get an underquilt for the first month or two and the last month or so.

  5. #5
    Registered User BigHodag's Avatar
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    Default re: Hammock and Sleeping Bag? N00b here

    I use a Grandtrunk ultralight travel hammock on the AT. I use a solid foam pad and flip my sleeping bag upside down as a comforter. I used a cheap 40F bag this year in early May in NJ and was fine into the upper 30's because of the solid foam pad and a big 8X10 tarp pitched low.

    In the summer I forego the sleeping bag and use a 1 pound quilted military poncho liner. I've been comfortable into the mid-50's with it.

    If you're planning to use a hammock on the AT in March, now is the time to experiment and develop a safe sleeping system - pad, underquilt, etc. Do some test hangs in your backyard with various combinations of sleeping bags & clothing. While you can watch Shug and hang at at our sister board, nothing takes the place of test hangs before you venture onto the AT. Know your system. Also, practice putting up & taking down at night and in the rain.

    Might also consider bug protection. (I sleep with a head net and cap on.)
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  6. #6
    2012 NOBO AT Hiker In Planning Hairball's Avatar
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    WOW! Thanks for all the helpful information! I really appreciate every post and comment. I am going to be doing a lot of field testing in the next few weeks to find what works best for me. When I'm indoors, I rarely run the heat in the winter and usually sleep with my window open and a fan on. I prefer the cold temps but I am aware of the dangers of hypothermia when hiking. It's not so easy to toss on a robe and make coffee outdoors. I think I will have more of a problem during the summertime. I tested my hammock this past summer and I really love it. I was lucky enough to win the TrekLight Double Hammock (First Prize!) in a promotion they did this summer. Being a big and tall person, I like the extra room. I know I'm rambling, I apologize, it's late and I've been scouring YouTube all evening watching AT vids! Again, thank you to everyone who replied. Looking forward to the AT 90 days!

  7. #7

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    I think this link will be very helpful - it was for me http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/f...splay.php?f=33

  8. #8
    2012 NOBO AT Hiker In Planning Hairball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvnv1212 View Post
    I think this link will be very helpful - it was for me http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/f...splay.php?f=33
    Thanks! I just registered and joined the hammock site. Lots of good info there. I'm really trying to keep things simple both financially and physically. I suppose the same is true for any item but some of the stuff people add to their hammocks just seems redundant and too much work. I'd love to hear of any cheap and simple options. I am a VERY warm sleeper. Thanks!

  9. #9
    mountain squid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hairball View Post
    It seems like a good way to combine gear without carrying too much stuff. I really don't even know if it will work but wanted to ask the experienced crowd in here first. Any advice or comments welcome. Thanks!

    ~Hairball
    Be absolutely certain that you are comfortable in a hammock and that includes staying warm. In my opinion by the time you add all the 'extras' for a hammock you might end up 'carrying too much stuff'. Extras might include: underquilt, sleeping pad, bug netting, tarp, extra clothes, etc. All those extras take up space and add weight. If you are comfy in a hammock the extras probably won't matter . . . if you are not comfortable and can't get a good nights sleep . . .

    Good Luck!

    See you on the trail,
    mt squid

    how to hike

  10. #10

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    [/URL]

    I got the idea from Speer Hammocks Peapod and used a sleeping bag with a vent at the foot end (Golite Feather-Lite - no longer available).

    This is another way you can get insulation all around you.

    As with an underquilt, you must make sure that the insulation is in direct contact with the bottom of the hammock or it will not insulate proplerly (in this case meaning that the bag must be snug, an admitted disadvantage to using an underquilt). The advantage is that setup is much easier and the package is lighter (especially if you have a hammock with mesh and a ridgeline, which makes this setup impossible without removing the ridgeline, and it would also mean that you'd have to carry the insect netting whether you want to or not).
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11
    2012 NOBO AT Hiker In Planning Hairball's Avatar
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    I just watched a youtube vid on the peapod and love the concept. The "actual" PeaPod is $369.00! Too rich for my blood. LOL. Being a really warm sleeper I think having a good bag is key and for the colder times, a sleeping pad of some sort for the back insulation. Ballcap with netting and I'm set! I appreciate all the great input here, thanks again to everyone who posted. Feel free to toss out advice or suggestions.

  12. #12
    2012 NOBO AT Hiker In Planning Hairball's Avatar
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    Sorry if I ramble or don't make much sense, I've been up for over 24 hours trying to get used to living in the daylight again! I'm a night owl by nature so this has been tough. It's almost time for some chili n crackers, a hot shower and ...BED! I could almost sleep anywhere right now but I'd love to be haingin in my hammock. Soon. Very soon. 89 days to Springer!

  13. #13
    Registered User WILLIAM HAYES's Avatar
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    go with an underquilt check out Jacks R Better they have a good selection you may also want to use an overquilt-it is difficult to get in and out of a sleeping bag in a hammock you can also add a pad like a nitelite and you should be fine. if it gets really cold and it does in georgia during march you can always sleep in a shelter

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