WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 104
  1. #1

    Default Dogs in the Shelters

    My NOBO hike is planned for mid March. My hiking buddy has an allergy to pet hair and is concerned about folks keeping their dogs in the shelter. How can this be handled tactfully?

  2. #2
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    High up in an old tree
    Posts
    14,440
    Journal Entries
    19
    Images
    16

    Default

    Education. He's not allegic to dogs - he's allegic to enzymes in animal saliva. Most dogs lick themselves and so do horses, cats as part of grooming. Pet the animal and touch your face or eye - and bang! The body reacts to it...

    Partial Solution - Bath your dog before you go - allow him/her to jump in streams - Rugby has a command for that "Get a drink"

    Real Solution - They get a dog. 6 months the allergic reactions stop because the human body can adjust. Measurable difference after three.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2011
    Location
    Somewhere near Parkville, Mo
    Age
    58
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Future Son in Law was terribly allergic to animals. We have 4 dogs and 3 cats. That was 3 years ago. No problems now.

  4. #4
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    High up in an old tree
    Posts
    14,440
    Journal Entries
    19
    Images
    16

    Default

    I forgot - You buddy can take benadryl too.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  5. #5

    Default

    That's interesting. I don't mind education. I'll let her know to start sleeping with a dog now in preparation as apparently she'll have to learn to do so as no one here disputed the fact that they will be in the shelters. Not sure she'll do it (I'm pretty sure she won't).

  6. #6
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    39
    Posts
    6,885
    Images
    78

    Default

    In all honesty the most tactful way to handle this would be for your hiking buddy to avoid shelters and stay in a tent. You're not going to find many people who have decided to stay in a shelter for the night that are going to move out just because you have an objection something they are doing. Shelters are a public space and if you plan to use it then you should be prepared to put up with whoever else is using it (this is another good reason to choose a tent over shelters in general). From what I understand there no are rules prohibiting dogs from being in them and shelters are tricky since in practice the "rules" are (with a few exceptions) unenforceable guidelines.

    Many dog owners including myself won't stay in shelters because we understand that not everyone wants a dog around and I don't always want my dog around everyone.

    For what it's worth, I think that once you get on the trail you will find this to be a fairly minimal problem.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  7. #7
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-21-2007
    Location
    Swedesboro, NJ
    Age
    65
    Posts
    5,341
    Images
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyofthewoods View Post
    How can this be handled tactfully?
    DON'T SLEEP IN SHELTERS! were you considering asking THEM to leave????
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  8. #8

    Default

    bring a tent
    Last edited by CrumbSnatcher; 01-14-2012 at 21:07.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-02-2010
    Location
    Bristol, CT
    Age
    36
    Posts
    270

    Default

    Since your a medical expert i guess..., there are people that are allergic to animal dandruff as well and not just their saliva. My sister can just sit in a house with an animal in it for awhile and will have her allergies start going crazy. You don't have to touch them.
    "We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." George Orwell

  10. #10
    Registered User SassyWindsor's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-19-2007
    Location
    Knightsbridge, London UK
    Posts
    969

    Default Expect disappointment

    Tell the hikers with the dog(s) about the allergy and see how that works out. I'll bet you'll get zero to leave a shelter or to not enter a shelter you've occupied. May even get a smart reply or two. Take a tent and stay clear of shelters. Otherwise, you may have trouble.

  11. #11

    Default

    For lots of reasons, I think we'll be tenting a lot. But, on occasion, I know we'll be in a shelter. I don't wish to have arguments just wondering how she'll be able to handle this issue.

  12. #12
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-21-2007
    Location
    Swedesboro, NJ
    Age
    65
    Posts
    5,341
    Images
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyofthewoods View Post
    For lots of reasons, I think we'll be tenting a lot. But, on occasion, I know we'll be in a shelter. I don't wish to have arguments just wondering how she'll be able to handle this issue.
    don't sleep with the dogs. why do you have more rights then the people with dogs????
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  13. #13

    Default

    A considerate owner will not let thier dog into a shelter in the first place. Of course, there are pleanty of inconsiderate dog owners out there, most of whom are not thru-hikers.

    If you show up and there is already a dog in the shelter, not much you can do or say, the damage has been done. Best to move on. If you get there first and a dog shows up, politely or not so politely ask them to keep the dog away because of allergies. And because the dog is muddy, soaking wet and your down sleeping bag is already spread out.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, Florida
    Age
    67
    Posts
    3,605

    Default

    You will soon find that the hikers that sleep their dogs in shelters are neither interested in you or their dogs comfort. Probably wouldn't want to be around them anyway.
    The trouble I have with campfires are the folks that carry a bottle in one hand and a Bible in the other.
    You never know which one is talking.

  15. #15
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2010
    Location
    Chillicothe, OH
    Age
    66
    Posts
    582

    Default

    Why should the hiker allergic to dogs have to stay in a tent. If you are hiking with a dog you should be considerate of others. This includes on the trail and at shelter sites. I have 4 dogs and leave them at home when I am hiking. On my 2010 thru hike I was awakened by a dog at the Overmountain shelter because an inconsiderate owner came in late with his dog and let the dog sleep on my sleeping bag.

  16. #16
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    39
    Posts
    6,885
    Images
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by soilman View Post
    Why should the hiker allergic to dogs have to stay in a tent. If you are hiking with a dog you should be considerate of others. This includes on the trail and at shelter sites. I have 4 dogs and leave them at home when I am hiking. On my 2010 thru hike I was awakened by a dog at the Overmountain shelter because an inconsiderate owner came in late with his dog and let the dog sleep on my sleeping bag.
    The operative word in your reply above is SHOULD. Shelters are public places and if you stay in them you have to deal with whoever comes around regardless of whether or not they are considerate. In my experience, if you're not willing to deal with others using shelters on their own terms than the best way to deal with it is to not use them. Just my two cents.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  17. #17
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-22-2007
    Location
    Springfield, Illinois, United States
    Age
    63
    Posts
    6,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    A considerate owner will not let thier dog into a shelter in the first place.
    Correct. A dog owner even CONSIDERING having their dog in a shelter during peak thru season is not one which talking will do you any good. They are a lost cause.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  18. #18
    Registered User SassyWindsor's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-19-2007
    Location
    Knightsbridge, London UK
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinMusic View Post
    Correct. A dog owner even CONSIDERING having their dog in a shelter during peak thru season is not one which talking will do you any good. They are a lost cause.
    I'd apply rude, crude, and just inconsiderate jerk(s) to those hikers who set their tent up in a shelter, with or without their dog(s).

  19. #19
    GA-ME 2011
    Join Date
    03-17-2007
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,071
    Images
    9

    Default

    From the ATC website concerning dogs on the trail: "Take special measures at shelters. Keep your dog leashed in the shelter area, and ask permission of other hikers before allowing your dog in a shelter. Be prepared to "tent out" when a shelter is crowded, and on rainy days."

    So even if dog owners followed the ATC guidelines and asked you if it was OK for their dog to stay in the shelter you can't do anything about the dog that was in there the night before. Then you have the problem of mice which might also cause an allergic reaction.

    Do yourself a favor and stay in a tent. You won't have to worry about sleeping in a dirty crowded shelter with snoring, stinking hikers that come in late or leave before dawn. The only shelters I stayed in on my thru-hike were in the Smokys where it's required. You can usually tent near a shelter if you want company or somewhere along the trail if you want privacy. You can't plan on always staying in shelters since they might be full so you'll need to carry a tent anyway. You're not missing anything by staying out of the shelters.
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Don H View Post
    You're not missing anything by staying out of the shelters.
    Yea, but life is SO much easier when you can. Especially if it happens to rain.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •