Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-20-2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    271
    Images
    9

    Default Sleeping Bag Liner

    Hey all,

    I recently purchased two new sleeping bags and I am looking to make myself a liner for each in order to promote their longevity. What types of fabrics would you recommend? I assume cotton is bad news but other than that I am not sure what would be best to go with. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Registered User Enic's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-09-2011
    Location
    Chambersburg, Pa
    Age
    33
    Posts
    92

    Default

    I saw silk on sale at JoAnne Fabrics a few weeks ago. Silk feels nice on the skin, is light and packs small... and is used for liners by big name manfacturing. Unless you want the bulk and insulation of fleece, I'd do silk.

  3. #3
    GA-ME 2011
    Join Date
    03-17-2007
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,007
    Images
    9

    Default

    Silk, it will add warm and keep your bag clean.
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-20-2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    271
    Images
    9

    Default

    I'll have to see if I can get a good deal on it!

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-06-2008
    Location
    Andrews, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    3,512

    Default

    Do you toss and turn in your sleep or thrash about like me? If so, you'll be a tangled mess in a liner (been there, done that). Sleeping in a clean pair of clothes or long johns may be a better option.

  6. #6
    bamboo bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-03-2005
    Location
    Rockingham VT and Boston, MA
    Age
    68
    Posts
    1,202
    Images
    1

    Default

    I have used a cotton liner for years. It's durable and can survive many washings on a long trip and it saves ruining a bag and of course the stink. The silk ones actually are lighter and work very well too but they are simply not durable on a long hike and cannot be washed repeatedly without being treated like your dainty underthings.
    Everything is in Walking Distance

  7. #7

    Default

    I made one from a satiny weight of polyester for my 2007 AT hike. However, I didn't take it since I made a RayWay quilt instead and was trying hard to keep the weight down.

    I still have it, so if you don't use it, it will last a long time without signs of wear or laundering damage.

    I did sleep in it one night at home, and noticed that it was a little tigt, but so are my current mummy down bags.

    I'd suggest that you make a prototype out of some polyester fabric. Then evaluate if you want to go on further and redesign it or use different fabric or resize it. Or do without.

    You'll also get some sewing practice in on larger items in case you want to make a tent or tarp or sleeping system in the future. You may not even want to sew large items, or even small ones. I am not excited by doing clothing as there is too much detail, but I will modify clothing such as putting in zippers or hemming or some drastic resizings.

    Have fun. That's most important.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-22-2009
    Location
    Ashburnham, MA
    Age
    73
    Posts
    1,925
    Images
    2

    Default

    For silk: http://www.thaisilks.com/index.php?cPath=1_2
    Cheap nylon or polyester would also work, or 100 weight fleece if you want to add a little warmth. Don't expect much additional warmth from a thin liner. Some people use lightweight long johns and socks to help keep their bag clean.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-20-2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts
    271
    Images
    9

    Default

    I went to JoAnn's today to see what I could come up with. I checked their silk section but it didnt seem to be the type I was looking for. One of the employees guided me over to the polyester "lining" section. I picked up some stuff that was "silk-like" in but is 100% polyester. After making two bags, I think these will do. I also plan on using some sort of long underwear or sleeping clothing but I figured a super lightweight liner might be more comfortable in the warmer months when I want to only sleep in underwear.

  10. #10

    Default

    The best liner is a clean set of long johns. It complicates getting into and out of a bag with a liner unless you sew or tie it in, and you can't wear the liner when you need to make a trip to the bushes in the middle of the night.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11
    Registered User Sandy of PA's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-10-2011
    Location
    Apollo, PA
    Age
    59
    Posts
    613
    Images
    2

    Default

    After struggling with a silk liner last year that just wouldn't stay put, I am going with a long silk nightgown instead. Weight is the same, works wonderful.

  12. #12
    Registered User Lyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-25-2006
    Location
    Croswell, MI
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,890
    Images
    68

    Default

    Silk.

    Warm, light, tiny packed size, slippery. Allows you to roll around inside your bag/under your quilt without getting into a tangled mess and without causing your bag/quilt to be pulled to one side or the other.

    Been using a silk liner for years now, and I'm a very restless sleeper. It is a bit of a hassle to get into your bag, but the advantages far outweigh this minor disadvantage. Relying on long johns still allows your dirty feet, arms, hands hair to soil your sleeping bag.

  13. #13

    Default

    I would be partial to a knitted silk jersey before I'd get a woven silk. Just like my longjohns. It would stretch a bit, and be less likely to tear. Similar to this: http://www.bonanza.com/listings/Moda...abric/21289554
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

  14. #14
    Registered User Sandy of PA's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-10-2011
    Location
    Apollo, PA
    Age
    59
    Posts
    613
    Images
    2

    Default

    Modal is not silk. It is bamboo based and will absorb and hold water!

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lyle View Post
    Silk.

    Warm, light, tiny packed size, slippery. Allows you to roll around inside your bag/under your quilt without getting into a tangled mess and without causing your bag/quilt to be pulled to one side or the other.

    Been using a silk liner for years now, and I'm a very restless sleeper. It is a bit of a hassle to get into your bag, but the advantages far outweigh this minor disadvantage. Relying on long johns still allows your dirty feet, arms, hands hair to soil your sleeping bag.
    Washing your hands and wearing clean socks (liner socks in summer) and a knit cap (many different weights available) will protect the whole sleeping bag. The only thing touching the inner of the bag will be the back of your neck.
    Getting into a bag with a liner is sometimes nearly impossible once you've gotten out of it. Sometimes the only solution is to remove the liner, get into that, and then get you and the liner back into the bag.
    And there's still the question of whether or not to carry an item which has very limited use (in this case, only two, at best - a liner, and a summer bag). You can't wear it when you need to go to the bathroom or while you cook at the campsite, like you can with long johns. Wearing a pair of unlined shorts over the long johns makes them more publicly acceptable, too.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  16. #16
    Registered User 4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    Rhome, TX / Monroe, NH
    Age
    60
    Posts
    7,277
    Images
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daddytwosticks View Post
    Do you toss and turn in your sleep or thrash about like me? If so, you'll be a tangled mess in a liner (been there, done that). Sleeping in a clean pair of clothes or long johns may be a better option.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    The best liner is a clean set of long johns. It complicates getting into and out of a bag with a liner unless you sew or tie it in, and you can't wear the liner when you need to make a trip to the bushes in the middle of the night.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy of PA View Post
    After struggling with a silk liner last year that just wouldn't stay put, I am going with a long silk nightgown instead. Weight is the same, works wonderful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    Washing your hands and wearing clean socks (liner socks in summer) and a knit cap (many different weights available) will protect the whole sleeping bag. The only thing touching the inner of the bag will be the back of your neck.
    Getting into a bag with a liner is sometimes nearly impossible once you've gotten out of it. Sometimes the only solution is to remove the liner, get into that, and then get you and the liner back into the bag.
    And there's still the question of whether or not to carry an item which has very limited use (in this case, only two, at best - a liner, and a summer bag). You can't wear it when you need to go to the bathroom or while you cook at the campsite, like you can with long johns. Wearing a pair of unlined shorts over the long johns makes them more publicly acceptable, too.
    What they all said. Get silk PJ's if you want dedicated sleepwear, they're not that heavy and can be justified as a luxury item. Otherwise, just use your base layer and keep a clean pair of sleep socks.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-18-2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    366
    Images
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    Getting into a bag with a liner is sometimes nearly impossible ...
    I love this kind of stuff! Very funny that the entire liner-using community manages, but the few who can't figure out how to slide into a sack shout "IMPOSSIBLE" from their virtual soap boxes. Thanks for the chuckle!

  18. #18
    Registered User Lyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-25-2006
    Location
    Croswell, MI
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,890
    Images
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by camping dave View Post
    i love this kind of stuff! Very funny that the entire liner-using community manages, but the few who can't figure out how to slide into a sack shout "impossible" from their virtual soap boxes. Thanks for the chuckle!

    :d .....................................

  19. #19

    Default

    [QUOTE] Originally Posted by Tinker [/QUOTE]



    Quote Originally Posted by Camping Dave View Post
    I love this kind of stuff! Very funny that the entire liner-using community manages, but the few who can't figure out how to slide into a sack shout "IMPOSSIBLE" from their virtual soap boxes. Thanks for the chuckle!
    At least he didn't say "Always" or "Completely" as qualifiers to his claim.

    A tight zipped up bag and an ample body circumference and putting the liner on after the bag is zipped tightly would be at least mildly difficult.If the bag is initially unzipped and keeping you warm, and then you slip into the liner and then you zip it up would be a lot easier.Stepping into the liner and then getting under the opened bag and then finishing the liner pullup and then zipping the bag is also a way to make the whole process easier.

    You could arrange a thing, using a good sized tree of climbing the tree, lowering yourself down into the liner held open by a limb below you, and then still lowering yourself into the zipped opened bag on a limb below that and then finally down to the groundcloth or tent entrance where you unclip the line and sink into blissful luxury is another option. This probably would appeal more to someone doing acrobatics for a circus.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy of PA View Post
    After struggling with a silk liner last year that just wouldn't stay put, I am going with a long silk nightgown instead. Weight is the same, works wonderful.
    Sounds good.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •