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  1. #1
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    Default Thru Hikers to those who aspire: list top 5 gear and clothing items people send home

    I thought it might be fun instead of picking apart gear lists so much to just list items everyone seems to think they need and then end up sending home. Here is my list:

    1) Water Pump
    2) Spare Clothes (list if you want)
    3) Gaiters
    4) Boots - traded for shoes
    5) Extensive first aid equipment

    (if not limited to 5, I could go on forever ; axes, compasses, poop shovels, laptop computers, .......)

  2. #2
    Punchline RWheeler's Avatar
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    This is an excellent idea! Thanks for starting it. I'll be interested to see what my 5 will be once I finish

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    I agree, good idea. Your list is solid. Other popular items sent home - books and/or journals (although I kept one the whole trip), personal hygiene items (deodarant, soap,etc.), camp towels, and musical instruments (esp. trumpets, dulcimers, banjoes and french horns with the occasional clarinet and oboe being jettisoned along the way). I think I saw an abandoned tuba on the approach trail.

    Do not even think about starting with a laptop or a plasma HDTV or a llama - odds are that you will not finish. Although I think strapping your gear to a llama should increase your chances. Does anyone know anything about llamas in the GSMNP or at BSP? If so, respond elsewhere to keep this thread on topic. I suggest you post your response in the straightforward forum. If bychance you do so and people respond by asking wth, please link this so they will understand that you have not completely lost your mind.

    If you are keen on hiking with an instrument or a laptop or a beast of burden, then by all means do so - after all, the overarching strategy for a succesful hike is but of course to HYOH.

  5. #5
    Registered User 4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    Only seeing eye Llamas are allowed in NP's.

  6. #6
    Punchline RWheeler's Avatar
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    Unless the llama has two powered USB ports, then they're also allowed in any federal land north of Jersey. But it can't be one that recharges from water. Too many "Oh, let me pee on your llama to charge my phone" incidents in Western MA.

  7. #7
    BYGE "Biggie" TOMP's Avatar
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    Dont be a gaiter hater, mine are waterproof and only 1.6 oz for the pair.

    I also wonder how many people that start with guns or rambo knifes actually finish with them or finish at all for that matter.

  8. #8
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMP View Post
    Dont be a gaiter hater, mine are waterproof and only 1.6 oz for the pair.

    I also wonder how many people that start with guns or rambo knifes actually finish with them or finish at all for that matter.
    oh yeah, I forgot Rambo knives - pretty funny Tomp - what's the deal with big knives? I have a little gerber knife and I use it to cut block cheese and sometimes (maybe) a piece of cord but it hardly ever gets pulled out of the pack - what do people DO with these knives?

  9. #9
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMP View Post
    Dont be a gaiter hater, mine are waterproof and only 1.6 oz for the pair.

    I also wonder how many people that start with guns or rambo knifes actually finish with them or finish at all for that matter.
    I'm not a gaiter hater - I also don't hate my skis or my ice axes or my kayak or my Mom - I just don't need them on the AT

  10. #10
    BYGE "Biggie" TOMP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa D View Post
    I'm not a gaiter hater - I also don't hate my skis or my ice axes or my kayak or my Mom - I just don't need them on the AT
    you dont need the AT guide either but its nice to have.

  11. #11
    BYGE "Biggie" TOMP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa D View Post
    oh yeah, I forgot Rambo knives - pretty funny Tomp - what's the deal with big knives? I have a little gerber knife and I use it to cut block cheese and sometimes (maybe) a piece of cord but it hardly ever gets pulled out of the pack - what do people DO with these knives?
    No idea, I've done a fair amount of survialist training over the years so I know a lot of uses for rambo knives, just none that make any sense on the AT. I wore my gerber rambo esq knife (22 oz) in the leg holster once to freak out a friend of mine that I finally convinced to come backpacking in the Catskills. I was like what you didnt bring one, you know you need it right? Well good luck...

  12. #12
    Registered User Papa D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMP View Post
    No idea, I've done a fair amount of survialist training over the years so I know a lot of uses for rambo knives, just none that make any sense on the AT. I wore my gerber rambo esq knife (22 oz) in the leg holster once to freak out a friend of mine that I finally convinced to come backpacking in the Catskills. I was like what you didnt bring one, you know you need it right? Well good luck...
    ha ha - sort of like the new kid on the carpentry crew - hey Billy, bring be that board stretcher over there, the red one - we need to load it on the sky hook

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    so many lessons, I found my pack weight much lighter when I dumped these items:

    1) Fishing pole w/tackle box and the coffee can full of earthworms
    2) Cast iron pancake griddle
    3) Extra town clothes in that *am Samsonite suitcase
    4) PS2 gameset
    5) that 6 person NW Territory dome tent I got at Kmart on sale the nite before the hike

    a virtual flea market of camping gear along the Approach Trail





    Quote Originally Posted by Papa D View Post
    I thought it might be fun instead of picking apart gear lists so much to just list items everyone seems to think they need and then end up sending home. Here is my list:

    1) Water Pump
    2) Spare Clothes (list if you want)
    3) Gaiters
    4) Boots - traded for shoes
    5) Extensive first aid equipment

    (if not limited to 5, I could go on forever ; axes, compasses, poop shovels, laptop computers, .......)

  14. #14
    Punchline RWheeler's Avatar
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    So as for clothes - 1 set to hike in (but spare socks?) and 1 set that stays dry for camp/sleeping, right?

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    I go with one set of clothes, that will be warm enough if I get a historic low for that month. From that I am able to pick out some dedicated sleep layers that are only used out and about if I get near the historic low. Same idea as what you said, but I make sure the sleep layers can be layered in efficiently with the other layers. I usually go with 3 socks, with any two of the 3 pair being able to be worn at the same time if needed. Depending on the season, 1 thin wool dress socks, 1 less thin wool hiking socks, and 1 pair of high ankle or knee socks. I can use one pair as mitts, or overmitts, to dry them out and multi-use.

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