Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31
  1. #1

    Default MILLION $$ SHOE ??'s

    Below is a modified response to something we just posted in the VFF thread. We're getting lots of calls with footwear inquiries and questions as NOBO season begins. Each year, the same individual preferences come up and the same problems send people home early. Its our hope that as many thru-hikers as possible take this to heart, we know how important finishing is - and its means so much to us to be a part of you all accomplishing your goals...

    Consider this first...Your chances of getting to Maine go up exponentially regardless of how good/light the gear is on your back when your feet are truly taken care of.

    There have been endless posts inquiring on general consensus of shoes... We all want light shoes that let us stretch our gate, be more nimble and increase efficiency. Here's the catch ...without seeing your feet and knowing what your background is, save yourself the headache of asking strangers opinions of shoes.

    There's basically 2 schools of thought when it comes to caring for your feet ...your feet are like your teeth, eyes...etc - they don't get better as you get older, so take care of them. The flip-side is (with age and physiology on your side), make them stronger through safe conditioning so the muscles can mitigate the load going to the connective tissue. Its the same reason a baseball team only gets 1-2 games a week on their best pitcher. If he overused his arm, the connective tissues in his arm would suffer injuries that take extremely long terms to recover because the muscle loses its ability to stabilize. Your feet are the same way - even MORE complex. A lot of people start too neutral and too light, get 100 miles in to us and decide to make changes. Unfortunately, a plantars issue, achilles tendonitis or an alignment issue has created a problem that REALLY needs weeks or longer with no use to heal. So, with that being said - this is VERY grey area, and getting a shoe plug on a forum can be really bad news despite all other good preparation.

    So what about conditioning your feet pre-hike with neutral shoes of barefoot shoes? Another really tough call... a 40yr old can't just join a gym and expect to lift what he did in highschool - if he ever gets to that point again, it could take months of conditioning. Accelerating the process could (and is likely) to cause something worse than ANY benefits you would ever receive with adaptation. We've seen AT hikers in their early-mid 20's in stellar physical condition have jacked-up feet. Everybody's adaptation is very different - and physiology rulesSo there really is no way to give a true shoe recommendation without having your feet looked at.

    Generalizing trail runners - this is probably one of the most sketchy invitations for a foot problem. People throw that term ("trail runner") around so liberally, but fail to recognize that a shoe does 2 things. Its 1st job is that its a garment for your foot. It protects from hot/cold, water, sharp things, dirt.... Its SECOND job is the most important - BIOMECHANICS!! I can pull 10 different trail runners that all do different things - but all most people know is that its a "trail runner". A shoe is a tool and you might need a different tool than the next guy to get the job done. You might very well be able to use a trail runner ...but do you need a posting, heel stability, shank ... what about volume distribution?? There are tons of questions. I can show (5) Salomons that all look like trail runners but range in comparable utility, similar to the differences between a Ford F-150 and a Porsche 911. What is best for your foot? You might like the Porsche but NEED the F-150.

    Then comes the way we fit - the cornerstone of being in the right shoe. Many fail to recognize that fitting is about 10% finding your size and 90% finding a shoe that fits your foot. A shoe should be reactive to YOUR foot, not the other way around ... most people put a shoe on and feel for the toe and call it a day. If you go somewhere and thats the first thing they do ...or if they ask what size YOU want - WALK AWAY!! They're clueless.

    Go get fit ..and let a pedorthist or someone pedorthist-trained that knows feet get you in what you need to be. You chances of getting to Maine go up exponentially regardless of how good your gear is on your back. If you have any specific questions, feel free to call us - we'll be happy to do our best to help you out.

    Outdoor 76
    76 E Main St. - Franklin, NC

  2. #2

    Default

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    The threads here are stuffed to the gills with folks saying what works for them and suggesting that the same will work for others.

    If it does, it's more freak luck than anything else.

    Get fitted by an expert, and accept the FACT that what you might WANT is NOT necessarily the best for you.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  3. #3

    Default

    Regarding trail runners, what can be done to differentiate them better in discussions? It's kind of like just saying sneakers. I know that the trail runner I use for hiking is not what I want to use for actual trail running.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  4. #4
    Donating Member Cuffs's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-20-2005
    Location
    Right here.
    Posts
    3,280
    Images
    36

    Default

    Who are you and who do you work for? TNF?
    ~If you cant do it with one bullet, dont do it at all.
    ~Well behaved women rarely make history.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuffs View Post
    Who are you and who do you work for? TNF?
    Says right at the bottom of his post. Outdoor 76 at 76 E Main St. in Franklin, NC. He's introduced himself here before.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuffs View Post
    Who are you and who do you work for? TNF?
    We're an outfitter that is deeply committed to serving thru-hikers. We're not doing this to promote any brand or even ourselves. Nothing would make us happier than to see people coming to us with NO foot issues. Our reason for posting this is to give insight to all that don't know that there are really important issues with footwear.

  7. #7
    Registered User Mother's Finest's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-02-2006
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Age
    48
    Posts
    649

    Default good post

    good post

    droppin some science on y'all

    peace
    mf

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alligator View Post
    Regarding trail runners, what can be done to differentiate them better in discussions? It's kind of like just saying sneakers. I know that the trail runner I use for hiking is not what I want to use for actual trail running.
    That's all relative to the foot they're going on ...and yes, its like "Kleenex" - just a term. A trail runner could easily be generalized as a sneaker with an aggressive sole. Differentiation is in the technical biomechanic features of a shoe - from posting to volume distribution and everything in between. And you're not the norm - many think the shoe they run in could/should be the same shoe they hike in.

  9. #9
    13-45 Section Hiker Trash
    Join Date
    04-09-2008
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    47
    Posts
    1,080
    Images
    1

    Default

    I think this is some great advice. I’m not a shoe expert by any means, but I have bought a lot of different pairs of shoes…and I mean a lot so I have a good bit of experience in dealing with the frustrations of not having the right footwear.

    The one thing I really liked was the mention of conditioning, and I wanted to expand on that a bit from my point of view. I used to wear boots, and decided to try out the trail runners. I read many threads on WB and other sites where people give advice to jump right into trail runners. This may work for some, but for me it took quite a while to build up the muscles in my feet and ankles to be able to handle the stresses of backpacking in trail runners. So I went through maybe about 6 months of discomfort when I started, but then magically my muscles got built up and viola now I exclusively hike in trail runners (although I’ll break out the boots for deep snow).

    That was 2009 when I started using the trail runners, and since then I’ve just kept everything conditioned so I can handle hiking in them. So all that to say don’t underestimate how important conditioning is when considering more minimal types of footwear for hiking.

  10. #10
    Registered User ekeverette's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-08-2010
    Location
    greenville,north carolina
    Age
    62
    Posts
    387
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    thanks alot, i may be seeing you if my poor feet take me that far. went to the foot dr. yesterday, she's making me some inserts... but thanks, hope to visit your place.
    eveready

  11. #11
    Donating Member Cuffs's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-20-2005
    Location
    Right here.
    Posts
    3,280
    Images
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by waywardfool View Post
    Says right at the bottom of his post. Outdoor 76 at 76 E Main St. in Franklin, NC. He's introduced himself here before.
    Thanks captain obvious. However, when using an iPhone and the tapatalk app, that info is not provided.
    ~If you cant do it with one bullet, dont do it at all.
    ~Well behaved women rarely make history.

  12. #12

    Default

    Outdoor76, thanks so much for your post. I could tell by it that you really do want potential thru-hikers to be successful and you are correct to assert that taking care of your feet is of vital importance. For what it's worth, many years ago I lightened my load and was able to convert from boots to shoes and this has worked for me. Not sure it would have worked with a heavy load so what works for me might not work for others. This past weekend, I bet I went to ten different stores and could not find what i was looking for. They carried "trail runners" which tended to be on the heavy side almost like a low cut boot. I was looking more for a high-end running shoe with a tread made for the trail. I was disappointed the Asics, Brooks and even New Balance selection at these stores did not really have an agressive enough tread for the trail. Not asking what would work best for me as I would have to try it on first, but does anyone have a suggested model of shoe in these three brands to try?

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Outdoor76 View Post
    a 40yr old can't just join a gym and expect to lift what he did in highschool - if he ever gets to that point again, it could take months of conditioning. Accelerating the process could (and is likely) to cause something worse than ANY benefits you would ever receive with adaptation.
    Been there, done that - spent the next 6 months slowly working through the healing process. I hit the gym way too hard and too fast, trying to get in shape for my next hike. I now know to increase my workout slowly over several months, rather than over just a couple weeks. You might get away with it, or you might just do some damage that really sets you back.

    Of course, its way better to just stay in shape. I know, but...life happens!

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chummin' for Bear View Post
    I was disappointed the Asics, Brooks and even New Balance selection at these stores did not really have an agressive enough tread for the trail. Not asking what would work best for me as I would have to try it on first, but does anyone have a suggested model of shoe in these three brands to try?
    This brings up a REALLY good point ...a lot of people base their perception of a shoe from their experience with one or 2 models. Or worse yet, associate the quality of a shoe with how much they spent on them.

    We have lots of people come in - ranging from EXTREMELY active, to soccer moms that walk the greenway once a week - and they might say "I've had 2 different pairs of New Balance and my feet still kill me". They take their shoes off and immediately we severe signs of overpronation and the NB's they wore in are as neutral as a shoe can get ...they liked the color, of course. Unfortunately, nobody ever told them the benefits of a posted shoe, regardless of size. Usually, its as simple as getting the biomechanics right. Almost all companies out there make a full range of shoe for every type of gate, stride and usage. Truthfully there's not really anyone that makes a bad shoe - we don't sell Saucony, but I love them and they work great for me. Salomon makes an incredible biomechanic shoe, but volume distribution might not work for some. A good shoe shop will study your foot hard and they should be able to combine that with a good knowledge of what's on their wall ...or even someone elses. Try to stay open minded

  15. #15

    Default

    MILLION $$ SHOE ??'s

    Uh, it's shoes........no apostrophe necessary. ..............

    From Mother's finest (apostrophe necessary to show ownership).
    droppin some science on y'all..........(the apostrophe here shows the replacement of a letter or letters with said apostrophe).

    and a little grammar.
    Last edited by Tinker; 01-26-2012 at 18:43.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  16. #16

    Default

    Usually, its as simple as getting the biomechanics right.

    Nope. Too simple. (That's what many people think, from what I've seen. They want to ask about waterproof/breathable, durability, grip, etc. etc).

    Thanks for setting it straight.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Outdoor76 View Post
    Below is a modified response to something we just posted in the VFF thread. We're getting lots of calls with footwear inquiries and questions as NOBO season begins. Each year, the same individual preferences come up and the same problems send people home early. Its our hope that as many thru-hikers as possible take this to heart, we know how important finishing is - and its means so much to us to be a part of you all accomplishing your goals...

    Consider this first...Your chances of getting to Maine go up exponentially regardless of how good/light the gear is on your back when your feet are truly taken care of.

    There have been endless posts inquiring on general consensus of shoes... We all want light shoes that let us stretch our gate, be more nimble and increase efficiency. Here's the catch ...without seeing your feet and knowing what your background is, save yourself the headache of asking strangers opinions of shoes.

    There's basically 2 schools of thought when it comes to caring for your feet ...your feet are like your teeth, eyes...etc - they don't get better as you get older, so take care of them. The flip-side is (with age and physiology on your side), make them stronger through safe conditioning so the muscles can mitigate the load going to the connective tissue. Its the same reason a baseball team only gets 1-2 games a week on their best pitcher. If he overused his arm, the connective tissues in his arm would suffer injuries that take extremely long terms to recover because the muscle loses its ability to stabilize. Your feet are the same way - even MORE complex. A lot of people start too neutral and too light, get 100 miles in to us and decide to make changes. Unfortunately, a plantars issue, achilles tendonitis or an alignment issue has created a problem that REALLY needs weeks or longer with no use to heal. So, with that being said - this is VERY grey area, and getting a shoe plug on a forum can be really bad news despite all other good preparation.

    So what about conditioning your feet pre-hike with neutral shoes of barefoot shoes? Another really tough call... a 40yr old can't just join a gym and expect to lift what he did in highschool - if he ever gets to that point again, it could take months of conditioning. Accelerating the process could (and is likely) to cause something worse than ANY benefits you would ever receive with adaptation. We've seen AT hikers in their early-mid 20's in stellar physical condition have jacked-up feet. Everybody's adaptation is very different - and physiology rulesSo there really is no way to give a true shoe recommendation without having your feet looked at.

    Generalizing trail runners - this is probably one of the most sketchy invitations for a foot problem. People throw that term ("trail runner") around so liberally, but fail to recognize that a shoe does 2 things. Its 1st job is that its a garment for your foot. It protects from hot/cold, water, sharp things, dirt.... Its SECOND job is the most important - BIOMECHANICS!! I can pull 10 different trail runners that all do different things - but all most people know is that its a "trail runner". A shoe is a tool and you might need a different tool than the next guy to get the job done. You might very well be able to use a trail runner ...but do you need a posting, heel stability, shank ... what about volume distribution?? There are tons of questions. I can show (5) Salomons that all look like trail runners but range in comparable utility, similar to the differences between a Ford F-150 and a Porsche 911. What is best for your foot? You might like the Porsche but NEED the F-150.

    Then comes the way we fit - the cornerstone of being in the right shoe. Many fail to recognize that fitting is about 10% finding your size and 90% finding a shoe that fits your foot. A shoe should be reactive to YOUR foot, not the other way around ... most people put a shoe on and feel for the toe and call it a day. If you go somewhere and thats the first thing they do ...or if they ask what size YOU want - WALK AWAY!! They're clueless.

    Go get fit ..and let a pedorthist or someone pedorthist-trained that knows feet get you in what you need to be. You chances of getting to Maine go up exponentially regardless of how good your gear is on your back. If you have any specific questions, feel free to call us - we'll be happy to do our best to help you out.

    Outdoor 76
    76 E Main St. - Franklin, NC
    Great post and thank you, I may drive to Franklin next time for a great fit! Thanks again.
    Don't Die Before You've Had A Chance To Live!

  18. #18

    Default

    Hey,I like and appreciate your post.Often I've found that it's not the shoe that needs breaking in,but the foot to a new shoe,and feel this is normal.I don't recall a time when I've put on a shoe(trail runner,boots,sneaker,tinnies or what ever)and not felt some of these Biomechanics slowly taking over,,,but eventually they see it "my way".Or is it the other way around?

  19. #19

    Default

    Order of importance for me for a shoe: Weight, fit, tread, what's inside?.

    I have a nearby 2nd hand shoe store here that probably has 30,000 pair of shoes.

    I go through looking for my aprox size and pick them up, throwing the lightest weight ones on a pile.

    Then I start trying them on. I want them big, a little bit too big (at least one size) I've lost too many toenails over the years.

    Then I look at the tread as I'm on slippery surfaces a lot. the more tread the better (but still lightweight is no. 1 priority)

    Then I look inside. If it has a lot of arch support and crap, they get thrown on the "no" pile.

    I read the book, (born to run) switched to the least supportive shoes and my knee problems went away.

    Anyway, that's my 2 cents on this subject.
    I know what I do is not for everybody. But it works for me.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    Order of importance for me for a shoe: Weight, fit, tread, what's inside?.

    I have a nearby 2nd hand shoe store here that probably has 30,000 pair of shoes.

    I go through looking for my aprox size and pick them up, throwing the lightest weight ones on a pile.

    Then I start trying them on. I want them big, a little bit too big (at least one size) I've lost too many toenails over the years.

    Then I look at the tread as I'm on slippery surfaces a lot. the more tread the better (but still lightweight is no. 1 priority)

    Then I look inside. If it has a lot of arch support and crap, they get thrown on the "no" pile.

    I read the book, (born to run) switched to the least supportive shoes and my knee problems went away.

    Anyway, that's my 2 cents on this subject.
    I know what I do is not for everybody. But it works for me.
    I saw that book in the library(book store)and walked on by,think I'll take another look,thanks

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •