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  1. #1
    Registered User Just Plain Jim's Avatar
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    Default Hiking the first 100 miles

    I have been planning to hike the first 100 miles of the LT since 2009. Unlucky me, I now have a full knee replacement since last April, thanks partly to 30 years of running.

    My niece and I want to hike the trail this August and my biggest concern is will I be able to.

    What can I expect as for as the layout of the trail, will there be any boulder hopping [ouch]? I don't mind ups and downs. I am slowly rehabilitating and am up to hiking 15 miles a week [5 days a week] with 7 months to go. I am still a little leary but rearing to go.


    Any advice will be appreciated..........................JPJ

  2. #2
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    The downhill into Bennington, VT (Route 9) can be pretty wicked on the knees.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spokes View Post
    The downhill into Bennington, VT (Route 9) can be pretty wicked on the knees.
    Stone steps - LOTS of them.

    I found that when it rained the trail became a mud slide in spots. One stretch was a sidehill which was so muddy I kept sliding off into the weeds. Overall, though, if it isn't very wet the southern Long Trail isn't any harder than the AT farther south.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  4. #4
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    Mostly you need to pay attention to footing with all the rocks, roots, mud, etc. There are some bigger rocks up towards the summit of Killington but nothing you can't just walk on - not like the stuff you'll find further north on the LT or like on the AT in the Whites and ME.

  5. #5
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    I would expect fairly normal, typical east coast type trail hiking. There is nothing overly unique about the southern 100 miles of the Long Trail, it's up and down, rocks an roots, etc...

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by stranger View Post
    I would expect fairly normal, typical east coast type trail hiking. There is nothing overly unique about the southern 100 miles of the Long Trail, it's up and down, rocks an roots, etc...
    It reminds me of hiking in NC TN sections, just better......cuz its Vermont. It gets wet in June, really wet, potential flooding

  7. #7

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    The Long Trail tends to be a pretty rough trail in a lot of places. We're talking 6 to 8 out of 10 in terms of difficulty. The Long Trail invented PUDs. If there is a big rock in the way, they make you go over it, not around. At 72 and with a new knee, I'd be looking for a little mellower section of trail to hike.
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  8. #8
    Registered User Nitrojoe's Avatar
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    I had a full knee replacement last March 31. Four months after my knee replacement I climbed Half Dome and since then have hiked several hundred miles of trails around my location. The key to near total recovery is exercising that knee area. You got to get as much bend in the knee that you replaced as your other good knee. Its painfull and it will cause tears to your eyes, but it has to be done. Just hiking normal trails wont do it. Go on some challenging trails and get some bending and flexing of that new knee joint. I also use hiking poles which helps alot. Just remember to shorten them when your going up hills and longer going down hills. Good luck to you and maybe well met on the AT this year. Ill be starting my thru on March 07.

  9. #9
    Registered User Just Plain Jim's Avatar
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    I like you Nitrojoe! My crying is behind me. Unlike a lot of other people that I know, I soaked up the therapy last year. Pain what pain? Ha! I'm not going until August and WILL be ready.

  10. #10

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    No need to worry about big miles. The good thing is that if you are a shelter hopper, you have multiple spots to decide if you are done for the day or moving on.

  11. #11
    Registered User Just Plain Jim's Avatar
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    What about mosqiitos??? Do I need a head net?

  12. #12
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain Jim View Post
    What about mosqiitos??? Do I need a head net?
    No. Not needed, especially from July on.

  13. #13
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    Southern VT is a special place...lots of ponds, views and shelter options. Best of all is that Christmas tree smell whenever you gain elevation. Have fun this summer.
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  14. #14
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    The southern LT is much, much easier than the northern portion. I don't remember the southern LT as all that difficult for a mountainous trail. The northern LT is a different story.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  15. #15
    Registered User Yukon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff View Post
    Southern VT is a special place...lots of ponds, views and shelter options. Best of all is that Christmas tree smell whenever you gain elevation. Have fun this summer.
    Couldn't agree more Jeff, the southern LT is awesome. My absolute favorite place to hike. My fiancee said she wishes she could bottle the smell of the woods up on Glastenbury and Stratton

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