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  1. #1

    Default Can we talk shoes?

    I have no experience buying long distance shoes for a thru. Everywhere I read trail runners are the way to go. I have been looking at the salomon xa pro and xa comp. I also like the crossmaxes and the vasque Juxt, which is actually a cross training/multisport shoe. I like the idea of these types of shoes over trail runners for the durability and suposed high milage. Can anyone give any other specific recomendations. Money is not an issue but I do not plan on buying 4 shoes as I make my way to maine. Also very curiouis about the vaswue juxt if anyone knows anything about them.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    please use the search function regarding shoes, its a subject that has no rules.you really need to get a few ideas already posted here and then get to an outfitter who can fit you properly. everyones foot is different and there is no one shoe that suits everone. personally id like to recommend my own boot of choice, Keen TargheeIIs(size 11.5)

  3. #3
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
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    You likely ain't gonna make it on one pair no matter what you use.

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    Registered User johnnybgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertyguy View Post
    Money is not an issue but I do not plan on buying 4 shoes as I make my way to maine.

    Thanks!
    One pair certainly won't hold up from GA-ME . The daily pounding of rocks and inclement weather will take it's toll on your shoes. Also, the size of your feet will certainly swell due to fluid retention so sizing up may be necessary as you make your way up the trail.

    I too like the Keen Targhees,but some on this board hate them and therefore I suggest trying different shoes until you find what feels good to you.
    Getting lost is a way to find yourself.

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    International Man of Mystery BobTheBuilder's Avatar
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    I've come to the conclusion that everybody's feet and shoe needs are different, but since you asked, this is my opinion. Your Mileage Will Definitely Vary.

    Stiff soles reduce bruising from miles and miles of rocks and roots. The type of super-light trail runners you can get from Nike don't feel to me like the sole is stiff enough hiking, more like for jogging on well-graded park trails. I never found that I needed the high ankle support, so I just wear well-fitting trail runners / lightweight hikers from Merrell or something similar.

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    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Shoes is journey of trial and error.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  7. #7
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
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    I was wearin' New Balance 883s, not even a trail runner, just a running shoe. Never had any problems with bruising. They don't last long. I only got 500 - 600 miles out of a pair, upper shot and soles pretty bad, too. Interstingly, my feet didn't grow/expand.

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    you need to go to an outfitter and try on lots and lots. The ones that you really are comfortable in will talk to you. Even then you may change your mind.

    I got some Innov-8s I liked, fit foot really good, , but I just cant get over the feeling that my heel is about to slip out. Its not, but the back of the shoe is just a tad lower than most others, and it FEELs that way. I cant handle that naked achiles feeling, so I dont wear em.

    psychological, yep.

  9. #9
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    I found that getting shoes/boots at an outfitter to be quite hit and miss.......mostly miss. I just never could judge how my feet would react to a shoe/boot by walking around a store. I have bought footwear at an outfitter only to sell it on eBay after giving up on it.

    What finally worked for me was to buy the same make of shoe I wear all the time. I was comfortable with the New Balance 609/621 for daily use and decided to try the 806. My search was over. If you have a shoe that you are comfortable with, maybe try a model of the same brand? YMMV
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChinMusic View Post
    Shoes is journey of trial and error.
    Quoted for truthiness

    How many monkey butlers will there be?

    One at first. But he'll train others.

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    Registered User Sensei's Avatar
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    As others have said, everyone's feet are different. I hiked the entire AT in two pairs of Brooks Cascadia trail runners. I didn't see a more durable shoe on the AT, for what it's worth.
    This is an adventure.

  12. #12

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    Research how shoes/boots are constructed and measured. Fit is the ONLY real important issue. Your feet WILL get wet so don't worry about waterproof boots (they may just take longer to dry). I have very wide feet with high arches and it has taken 4 years and too many tries to finally find the right pair. Find somewhere you can take them home and wear them for a week and still return them. Don't get suckered into buying what your outfitter may stock. If you educate yourself and find that you know more about shoes than your outfitter, then you may need to find a new outfitter. There are lots of different styles and shapes for different feet. Even in the same brand, given the same size, the shoes can be made from different "last" and will fit differently. Remember you feet will flatten and grow as you hike. A good rule of thumb is to get a shoe 1/2 too big.

  13. #13
    Registered User seasparrow's Avatar
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    Keen are known for their large toe box,end of shoe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seasparrow View Post
    Keen are known for their large toe box,end of shoe.
    I liked that about keens, but the sole started to peel away from the shoes in a matter of days. 4 or more pairs of shoes in a thru hike isn't uncommon. chances are you'll go through at least 3.

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    BYGE "Biggie" TOMP's Avatar
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    You said you read that trail runners are the way to go, but more importantly what do you usually hike in. What if you find out you hate trail runners as some do? Buy something try it out before you commit to anything on your thru-hike. Make sure you go on one long hike (plus 50 miles) in your life before doing a thru if you havent already, I think it will give you a good idea of how you and the footwear will do on long distance without much effort. Or since your in GA, and might be close to the trail, just give yourself a bailout point if the footwear you choose isnt working for you.

  16. #16

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    I have always hiked in Merrells, I currently own no less than 8 pair. I use the 49.99 Dr. Schulz orthotics that I get at Walmart.... FOR ME... its like hiking in slippers..maybe not for you, but I swear by Merrells.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertyguy View Post
    . Also very curiouis about the vaswue juxt if anyone knows anything about them. [sic]

    Thanks!
    I own 2 pair of Vasque, I got them because their parent company is Red Wing Boots and I own some of those too... But, the Vasque is not a terrible shoe and you can usually find them on closeout because many people kinda shy away from them. I still prefer my Merrells, but I have a pair of Vasques that I have about 700 miles in ...I have beat the hell out of them and they still hold up and perform as well as any New Balance or other 80-110 dollar priced, comparable shoe.

  18. #18

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    I've got Saloman Exit Aeros, Saloman XA Pro 3D, and Keen Siskiyou. They're all comfortable, break in easy, never had a blister. You really just have to try them...like everyone says it's hit or miss! As far as waterproof goes...they all seem to hold as much water as they can!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Badspeller View Post
    I have always hiked in Merrells, I currently own no less than 8 pair. I use the 49.99 Dr. Schulz orthotics that I get at Walmart.... FOR ME... its like hiking in slippers..maybe not for you, but I swear by Merrells.
    Just bought a pair today. Was only $80. Good support around ankles and roomy enough near toes. I like them so far. Will be hiking tomorrow to start breaking them in.

  20. #20
    Registered User GrassyNoel's Avatar
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    I've been doing a lot of hiking in the Merrell Thermo 6 boot and they're great. Always comfortable, always warm, fantastic. I also wear them around the city and have never encountered a sore spot. I walk about 2.5 miles to and from work every day and often another 2 during the day. The trail tends to be softer than the city street! They may be too hot to wear when the weather gets warm(er?) but for "winter" hiking in NY they're good. Everything else may be sore at the end of a hike, but my feet are never the culprit.

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