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Thread: Backpack weight

  1. #1
    Registered User Drybones's Avatar
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    Default Backpack weight

    I have a fairly new REI Flash 65 that weighs 3lb, 3oz and is a pretty decent pack. I have my cold weather pack weight down to 26-27 (includes supplies for 4 days) pounds depending on what exactly I end up taking. I'm considering the purchase of the new Granite Gear Crown A.C. 60 when it becomes available. I believe it weighs 2lb, 2oz...is it worth $220 to save a pound?

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    It depends on how much walking comfort is worth to you, and if the AC60 rides as comfortably has the Flash.

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    Garlic
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    I made the leap from a three-plus pound pack similar to the REI to a one-pound frameless pack for only about $120, and that was certainly worth it for me. No, I don't think I would spend $220 on that pack. There are plenty of frameless packs that can handle 30 pounds (Gossamer Gear, SixMoon, et al), but are you ready to make that leap?
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    but are you ready to make that leap?
    That's a scary leap...one I expect I will make one day. sddavis: I recently made a similar move to the one you are asking about, dropping down to the ULA Circuit (from the GG Nibus Ozone) and feel that was worth it, probably not in economic terms, but in the fact that I had to continue to "simplify" my gear.

    Moving to the frameless pack brings me back to that "fear" discussion. I just worry (fear!!) that I might need the extra carrying capacity for long hauls between food or water sources, especially since I'm not the fastest hiker out there!!

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    Registered User dandandan's Avatar
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    That is a lot of money to drop a pound. While I dont know exactly what you're taking, you could probably drop over a pound for free by simply leaving some things at home.
    I've seen more spine in jellyfish

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    Registered User Loneoak's Avatar
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    Lightest one I have seen is the Z pack cuban fiber at 9 oz.....now that is light

  7. #7

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    I have a REI Morningstar pack from the mid - 1980s that I modified back in the early 2000s by shortening all the straps and removing the top pocket. I can't remember exactly what it weighs now, but I believe that I took 1-1/2 lb. off of it. Without the top pocket I really need to use a rain cover now, since the closure is just a draw cord, but, since I've purchased a couple of much lighter frameless packs I don't use it for hiking anymore. It's my trail maintenance pack. The back padding, stays, and heavier fabric make it a good hauler for my chainsaw and clippers.

    OP - Try removing your frame stays and replacing them with a blue foam pad unrolled vertically in your pack. For the weight of the pad you'll have a free "frame" which doubles as a sleeping pad (if you can stand the firmness).

    Since I've gone frameless I've only used my blue foam on a couple of near emergency occasions for sleeping, and did ok. It's not hammocking, though!
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  8. #8

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    www.golite.com is having a mega sale now. Jam packs were something like $69.00.

    Just double-checked.

    Yep - $69.00. Wrongway_08 used one on his thru.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    Try removing your frame stays and replacing them with a blue foam pad unrolled vertically in your pack.
    That will give you the chance to see how you might do with a frameless pack...I like that!!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pyroman53 View Post
    That will give you the chance to see how you might do with a frameless pack...I like that!!
    If you get a frameless pack it's more crucial that it fit your torso length well. I lucked out with my large Golite Dawn and my large Granite Gear Virga pack. Have a qualified salesperson measure your torso and keep the measurements for future reference.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinker View Post
    OP - Try removing your frame stays and replacing them with a blue foam pad unrolled vertically in your pack. For the weight of the pad you'll have a free "frame" which doubles as a sleeping pad (if you can stand the firmness).
    I just got back yesterday from 43 miles on the PCT doing this. I took the frame out of my ULA Catalyst and used a blue foam pad. It worked great as a frame, but I wasn't really crazy about how it influenced the order in which I packed and unpacked.

    I've also borrowed a pack that uses a z-rest for the back pad. I liked it as a pack, but hated the short pad when I was sleeping...I kept wiggling around and the pad wouldn't stay under me like a longer pad would.

  12. #12

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    I had a GVP G4 pack which had a pocket for a pad. It was good padding for the back but very poor as far as supporting the load is concerned. I tried my old method of placing the pad inside the pack (been doing this for years - since 1993 with a heavy Thermarest), and found that the shape of the pack (big at the bottom) did not work well with this arrangement - so I sold it and bought the Golite Dawn - I love that pack and wish they would bring it back. It is awesome in its simplicity - fewer seams to fray or split than most packs, with a solid Dyneema bottom - fantastic! (but, unfortunately, too basic - not enough bells and whistles- for the regular hiking crowd - so they discontinued it in favor of sleeker looking packs with hydration sleeves and more pockets). A pack shaped like a bucket is best for the "ccf pad used as a pack liner/frame" method.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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    Quote Originally Posted by sddavis View Post
    I have a fairly new REI Flash 65 that weighs 3lb, 3oz and is a pretty decent pack. I have my cold weather pack weight down to 26-27 (includes supplies for 4 days) pounds depending on what exactly I end up taking. I'm considering the purchase of the new Granite Gear Crown A.C. 60 when it becomes available. I believe it weighs 2lb, 2oz...is it worth $220 to save a pound?

    It might be worth it to have a pack that doesnt fall apart on you. Heard of more than one REI falling apart on the trail.

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    Registered User Ohio Grown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    It might be worth it to have a pack that doesnt fall apart on you. Heard of more than one REI falling apart on the trail.
    Yes. I recently spoke to a REI employee and former thru-hiker who told me while some of their packs are decent and good buys for short trips, they probably wouldn't last an entire thu-hike.

  15. #15

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    I started with a Gregory Baltero 75 (5 lbs) - sold that, bought a Flash 65 3 lbs 2 oz (still have it) - and went to a Zpacks Exo http://zpacks.com/backpacks.shtml under a pound, so $ saved me 2 lbs. I'm done!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    It might be worth it to have a pack that doesnt fall apart on you. Heard of more than one REI falling apart on the trail.
    Here's a lesson on how a piece of gear with good nylon fabric is only as good (as a tool) as the quality of the thread and stitching.

    Cheap thread is a death sentence for any sewn piece of gear (as is poor stitching). (Learned second-hand - I don't sew any gear -except for hand-sewn loops and minor repairs -, I'm more into mechanical stuff).
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  17. #17
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    As far if it is worth $220 to save a pound, see if there is a cheaper pound to pare first.

    Make a list of your gear and look to see if there is a comparable piece of gear that you can cut that weight for less money. When I first made the lightweight leap (still ongoing...), I lost 7 lbs for $350 (pack and bag) or $50 a lb and alchy stove/pot for $60/lb that was the low hanging fruit. Tent cost ~$100/lb and my most recent purchase (montbell ex light down) cost ~$300/lb but has the added advantage of being awesome. Every upgrade gets more and more expensive per oz/pound.

    Those changes were without any real performance decline. See if there are any lower hanging fruit than your pack. If there isn't then decide if you have $220 to spend vs all your other priorities. $220 can buy a lot (~440 cans of bud light), 1 lb over 2200 miles may make sense.

  18. #18

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    The ULA Circuit claims 35 lbs is the max weight but I have gone over that and was fine. Plus you can take the stay and frame out.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loneoak View Post
    Lightest one I have seen is the Z pack cuban fiber at 9 oz.....now that is light
    My ZPacks Blast 30 with a few attachments weighs 8.6 oz...and carries like a dream...of course though my last hike was 17 lbs with 4 days worth of food, my water and fuel...so, there's that...
    ...take nothing but memories and pictures, leave nothing but footprints, and kill only time... (Bette Filley in Discovering the Wonders of the Wonderland Trail)

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandandan View Post
    That is a lot of money to drop a pound. While I dont know exactly what you're taking, you could probably drop over a pound for free by simply leaving some things at home.
    My assumption exactly. At least, that's what I do. I have a Gregory pack, a Kelty, and two REIs (45 and 60). My REIs are my "go to" packs, though I might experiment with the 60, leaving the two stays at home for a trip (but will weigh them first to see if it's worth it).

    Gram weenies can get lost in the trees and sometimes don't seem able to see the forest.

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