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  1. #1
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    Default March 2013 NOBO Gear List- Amateur Hiker

    I am starting my thru-hike on March 1, 2013 and my gear list is as follows. Nothing is final yet but a lot of it I have already or am about to order so I can test them out before I leave next year. If anyone has any advice please share.

    -Pack:
    Osprey Kestrel 38

    -Sleeping Bag
    Kelty Light Year 40 degree Down

    -Sleep Pad
    Thermarest RidgeRest SOLite Sleeping Pad


    -Tent
    Eureka Solitaire 1 person tent

    -Stove/ Kitchen/ Water
    MSR Pocket Rocket w/ msr fuel (or whatever is available on the AT)
    Snow Peak Titanium Spork
    Snow Peak Trek 900 Titanium Cook Set
    2 or 3 Large Powerade type bottles for water

    -Misc
    Petzl Tikka Plus 2 headlamp
    Stuff sacks for clothes/ food and bear bag
    50ft cord
    Leatherman multi tool
    Gerber LED mini flashlight
    Basic homemade firstaid kit
    TP, and other basic toiletries
    Still debating on Trekking Poles

    -Clothes
    EMS Teckwick midweight top/bottoms base layers- 1 set
    Hiking Pants- 1 set
    Russel DriPower T-Shirt- 2 each
    Smartwool Merino Wool Socks- 2 pair
    Injinji Sock liners- 3 pair
    Outdoor Research Low Gaiters
    Running Shorts- 1 each
    Burton Mittens w/ removable liners
    Outdoor Research Beanie
    Turtle Fur Neck/ Face guard
    North Face fleece- doubles as pillow

    -Rain Gear
    Marmot Precip Jacket
    Columbia Thunderstorm II rain pants

    -Shoes
    Montrail Sabino Gore-tex trail running shoes

    I am still thinking about the food I am going to bring. Trail mix, nuts, jerkey, ramen, rice sides, clif bars, dried fruit, oatmeal, etc.
    I am going by the if you cant wear it dont bring it method so when if warms up I will be shipping most of my cold weather gear home with the exception of a few items.

    If there is anything you think I could use or not bring let me know, and let me what you think of my gear list overall. Like I said I am an amatuer hiker, but I have been doing lots of research so I think I am headed in the right direction. This isnt my final gear list but it is close to it.

  2. #2
    Punchline RWheeler's Avatar
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    You're going to want a warmer bag, at least through the Smokies.

    Why do you have so many socks?

    Down jacket, or other warm layer to throw on while taking breaks, or sitting in camp?

    Duct tape, lighter are also good things to carry.

    That's what jumps out at me right away, anyway.

  3. #3
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    I am through hiking the AT this march, so my advice is from years of experience as a hiker but not a former thru-hiker if that makes a difference to you.

    rain pants- have you used them, if not you may find that they are very hot and sweaty and not worth thier weight.
    leatherman- unless its the micro dont bring this its too heavy for its usefulness (get the micro or gerber makes a similar one for 20 bucks at 3 oz).
    40 degree bag- you will be cold for March 1st, upgrade to 20 degrees.

    Eureka tent- will do the job but its kinda bare bones and not the best. It was my first tent before I switched to MSR skinny one (discontinued) for room, comfort, lenght, overall set up, ability to pitch dry in rain and never looked back.
    Food- dehydrated whatever you like. I like to cut cake/brownie mix into my oatmeal to pack on calories.
    Treking poles- hope your debating on brand and not whether to bring them. Get a carbon cork black diamond they are amazing. Or cheap leki because of the awesome warranty, but not the best to use.

    Shoes- Never used that brand so I am just speculating but gortex and trail runner is an oxymoron. You cant have both in reality, the gortex in the trail runner will not keep you dry at all, it just add a lot of weight to the shoe. I have a pair of gortex scarpa boots that do stay 100 percent waterproof (4lbs ish). Also a pair of 16 oz inov-8 talon 212 runners. So pick one but dont expect to get both in the same shoe.
    Rain gear- whatever you bring just make sure its not more than 16 oz total and is 100 percent waterproof, not water resistant not 95 percent waterproof. I have had name brand rain gear in the past let water through when totally saturated and its not fun if your cold.

    Down vest- consider one in place of a fleece cause it usually weighs 4-7 oz less and is warmer. If you keep it dry its just better.
    Stuff sacks- make sure that they are waterproof.
    Osprey 38- Seems small, but if you can fit everything go for it. Although most people have a 65L. Also I think the osprey 38 is around the same weight as the osprey 65L so your not really gaining anything and with food and water it will be near impossible to fit it all.

    Bring aquamira too.

    Once you decide on a gear setup make sure it works for you. You say your an amateur (who is a professional?) I take that to mean you have low experience so I hope you didnt make this list by looking solely online at other people's lists. There are a lot of lists on here that work great for the person who posted it but I wouldnt want it for myself. Also figure out how much this weighs and see if that works for you. It is easier to pick lighter options when you know what your current gear weighs in comparsion.

  4. #4
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    I agree with RWheeler on the bag. Get something warmer and swap out when the weather warms up.

    Ditch the Leatherman- that's for car camping. A Victorinox Classic will do.

    50 ft of cord? Not paracord, 2mm cord is all you need. You'll appreciate a clothes line to dry wet stuff out. 10 ft of the same cord will do.

    Throw in a spare Lexan spoon in the bottom of your food bag. Carry the other in an easily accessible outer pack pocket in case you have a craving for a big scoop of peanut butter on a lunch break. BTW, your titanium spork is smart! It's great for attacking a frozen solid pint of Ben & Jerry's!

    Don't worry about the food stuff. You'll get enough ideas from fellow hikers along the way.

    Take a look at these two articles for more tips (ignore the popups)

    10 page article on hiking the AT from Backpacker Magazine. Great description of each section.

    The only gear list you need to compare against. It's tried and true. Add a 100 weight fleece if you want and trash compactor bag for a pack liner. 16-18 lbs for a cold weather pack isn't bad. Tweak for summer and go even lighter.

    Cheers!
    Last edited by Spokes; 02-06-2012 at 21:46.

  5. #5
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
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    I used the same bag last year. It will work if you wear some of your cold weather clothes on the occassional sub-freezing night.

  6. #6

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    Kestrel 68 is on sale at REI Outlet site.

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    I changed my tent to a Black Diamond Beta light Tarp. All of my gear fits in my pack and a lot of my cold weather gear will be on me so it wont take up extra room in my pack. When it warms up I will ship it home. If for some reason something doesnt fit in my pack I can strap it to the outside. I ditched the multi tool and went with a small knife that is very light. As for duct tape and aqua mira, I planned on bringing it, those were among the few things I forgot on my list.

  8. #8
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    More than likely, you will not wear any of your cold weather gear while hiking. It will only be used as a warm/dry change of clothes while in camp. Even in the snow/smokies, you will be working so hard that you will not need more than your regular hiking attire - ie: light pants and a t-shirt or lightweight thermal top.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighter503 View Post
    More than likely, you will not wear any of your cold weather gear while hiking. It will only be used as a warm/dry change of clothes while in camp. Even in the snow/smokies, you will be working so hard that you will not need more than your regular hiking attire - ie: light pants and a t-shirt or lightweight thermal top.
    cool beans.. I thought this would be so ( at least for me ) glad to hear that someone can back me up on it

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighter503 View Post
    More than likely, you will not wear any of your cold weather gear while hiking. It will only be used as a warm/dry change of clothes while in camp. Even in the snow/smokies, you will be working so hard that you will not need more than your regular hiking attire - ie: light pants and a t-shirt or lightweight thermal top.
    That makes sense about not wearing my cold weather gear a lot. I was messing around with my pack today and un clipped all the compression straps and I found that for it only being 38L it is pretty roomy so I am not worried about space anymore. I don't have that much if any excess stuff on my list so I should be fine. Plus I can hook stuff to the outside of the pack as well.

  11. #11
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    Sounds good Dodds. Glad to help Larry.

  12. #12
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    Pretty good. Lose the bottoms base layer, lose the mittens, lose The face guard and the rain pants IMO . Add a pair of socks and a warmer bag or a bivy. Hot days and cool nights.
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  13. #13
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    I made a gear list video. Some things were changed but most everything is the same.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ssOm...JKBaeqcJgQpXyY

  14. #14
    Registered User Moose2001's Avatar
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    Have to agree with the others on getting a warmer bag. March 1st will be cold in the southern mountains. Single digits are a very real possibility. I'd suggest a "good" 20 degree bag and a silk bag liner.

    Other things I see....Tikka and a flashlight? Ditch the flashlight.

    Hiking pants and rain pants? I'd forget the hiking pants and keep the rain pants. Unlike some others, I think it's a wise idea to have them. Once it warms up, you can always send them home. Plus, they make good wear on laundry day!

    Mittens with liners? A light pair of gloves will work fine.

    Turtle Fun neck face guard? Leave it at home.

    A 38 Liter pack is big enough? Hell.....I couldn't fit my food bag in a 38 Liter pack!
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  15. #15
    Registered User turtle fast's Avatar
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    1. You have a head lamp, you do not need the Gerber light.
    2. Consider zip off pants, the convertible shorts/pants that have zip off legs. It gives you more options for the weather.
    3. You may reconsider the MSR pocket rocket. The canisters are hard to find in small towns, use an alcohol stove the fuel is plentiful. Try the Etowah II stove, works well.
    4. A lot of socks, you may want to pair it down....however each persons feet are different and it may work for you. Standard is 2-3 pairs.
    5. Your Kelty bag may get cold in the Spring/Fall at 40 degrees rated...you would have to sleep with everything you got on and be uncomfortable. Or, use a bag liner to increase your temperature rating and send home when the weather gets warmer. Or, consider getting a warmer bag for Spring/Fall and send back home at a town and get a lighter sleeping bag for Summer.

  16. #16
    Registered User turtle fast's Avatar
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    Opps, trekking poles! Everyone has their own hiking style, but trekking poles help you with balance, pace, and footing. I have had poles help me from making a fall a few times and as an added benefit it can be used as a clothsline, emergency tent pole, weapon to brandish to ward off snarling dogs or ninjas. If you are looking for cheap, Walmart has some that are inexpensive...just check the baskets on the bottom they always tend to fall off and at under $20 is cheap.

  17. #17
    Punchline RWheeler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodds1990 View Post
    I made a gear list video. Some things were changed but most everything is the same.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ssOm...JKBaeqcJgQpXyY
    Looking good! I noticed that the cord is still unused. Sure, you have a year, but you want to get used to tying what you need for a bear bag and getting it set up. Try different methods (like the simple hoisting, or using the "PCT method") to figure out what you're most comfortable with. The best time to start ingraining something that you'll need to use over and over when you're tired is always yesterday!

    Glad to see you decided to grab some trekking poles.

    Also, just because it's winter doesn't mean you can't try out the rain pants. Put them on over a pair of shorts and just walk around the block or something. See how warm/sweaty you get from that. Because you know that if it gets you overheated during the winter, it's not gonna do much for you when it's warmer out.

  18. #18
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    You need to do one of the three: buy a far warmer sleeping bag (15 degrees) OR a buy very, very nice down jacket that you plan on wearing while in your sleeping bag OR to push back your start date by 6 weeks

    The following are things that I don't think are useful for an AT hike:
    rain pants
    gore-tex footwear
    TP
    gaiters
    leatherman


    Don't try to hard to avoid getting wet. Be prepared to dry out quickly.

    I dislike tents and strongly prefer tarps. YMMV

  19. #19
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    I am going on a 2 day 30 miles section hike this Monday and Tuesday from Delaware Water Gap to Sunrise Mountain in NJ. I will new testing out all my gear including my tarp so I will give an update how everything works out.

  20. #20
    Registered User cabbagehead's Avatar
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    I had a Eureka Solitaire, and every single pole segment broke. If you like this tent, get the Canadian version. It has 7000 series aluminum poles, and a few other differences. The poles from the Canadian version can easily be made to work with the American version. Also, if you get the Canadian version, use the seamseal, and spray it with waterproofer.

    The only thing I don't like about both versions is that there is no vestibule. I wouldn't want a large vestibule. I just want a place to store my shoes next to my tent without getting too much dirt in my tent.

    Other changes:

    That particular headlamp is reliable. Ditch the other light.

    Goretex boots are useful if you have gaiters over them, and rain pants over the gaiters. Trail runners don't have a long enough neck for gaiters. Goretex trail runners aren't a big deal, but non-goretex ones are better.

    It's a good idea to have a set of thin clothes that cover most of your body, and then spray them heavily with permethrin. These clothes will provide a barrier to mosquitoes and ticks, and will reduce the amount of deet you use. Also, spray permethrin in a ring around the top part of each shoe.

    Dry bags are important for sleeping bags and things you put at the bottom of the pack and need to keep dry.

    pack cover

    hiking poles
    BottleStoves.com alcohol stoves: lightweight, durable, efficient, made in USA (Ma), low cost
    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy5eDqBqQ-xXA4zw1bJ3sjQ

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