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  1. #1

    Default GoLite terrono or ULA G-4

    Planning on leaving March 1, 2013 - and wondering about packs. I'm planning on hammocking if I can, and I sleep cold. Also, I don't like to over compress my bag, so I'm thinking a bigger pack is in order if I take top quilt and under quilt. If I make the quilts out of .75 oz ripstop and 900 fill down, I can keep the total weight of the quilts under 37 oz for both. I haven't made them yet, so I don't have the exact weights.

    So, with that weight of bag + my Hennessy ultralight hammock (with cuben tarp - not the Hennessy tarp) , I'm still wondering if I'd be better off to go with the Terrono, which is on sale today for about $50 less than it was yesterday.

    Huge weight difference, but I'm thinking I'd appreciate the space in the Terrono. Oh - and for the middle states (VA - VT) , I just have a double faced radiant barrier pad for the bottom - the bottom quilt will go, so I think I can use my ultra light pack. So, this is just for colder weather.
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

  2. #2

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    Down is made for compression. Why use weight-saving down only to get a bigger bag and negate the savings? Or are you not aiming for that? Maybe I'm just missing your logic (completely possible!)

  3. #3

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    I always thought - and reading I've done has confirmed that compression over time WILL affect the down. And I figure upwards of 180 days counts as too long to compress as tightly as I can get it. I DO plan to travel after I retire, although it will likely be more bicycle camping than hiking. I hope to be using the same equipment as I do for the trail, although I pretty much realize that the clothes will be trash.
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

  4. #4
    BYGE "Biggie" TOMP's Avatar
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    It looks like the Golite Quest is about 1 lb lighter and actually 72 L vs 70 L terrono. Also 20 bucks cheaper. I would think that is your best option of the 3.

  5. #5

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    Did you mean Gossamer Gear G-4? http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpa...ckpack-63.html

    I had one. Didn't carry well when not stuffed tightly. The broader hip area makes it ineffective when used with a closed cell foam pad used as an internal circumferential liner with other gear stuffed inside.

    Works better with the pad stuffed in the supplied mesh back pocket.

    Still does not carry as well as my Golite Dawn with ccf pad used as liner (and doormat and sleep mat for non-hanging options).

    A pack with straight sides (cylindrical bucket shaped) works best when used as above.

    If I hadn't stumbled upon the packing option I currently use, I would have switched back to internal aluminum stays long ago.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  6. #6
    Digger takethisbread's Avatar
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    Seems like a lot of work and expense on your quilts for what amounts to 3 weeks hiking.

    If you are going ultralight, why not just leave in April, sans the heavy quilts, and I would go with the GoLite pack. It packs small loads well, it's more durable on the AT where thorns and vines/branches may destroy the G4. The Go Lite will make it all the way and then be useful to you in the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by quilteresq View Post
    Planning on leaving March 1, 2013 - and wondering about packs. I'm planning on hammocking if I can, and I sleep cold. Also, I don't like to over compress my bag, so I'm thinking a bigger pack is in order if I take top quilt and under quilt. If I make the quilts out of .75 oz ripstop and 900 fill down, I can keep the total weight of the quilts under 37 oz for both. I haven't made them yet, so I don't have the exact weights.

    So, with that weight of bag + my Hennessy ultralight hammock (with cuben tarp - not the Hennessy tarp) , I'm still wondering if I'd be better off to go with the Terrono, which is on sale today for about $50 less than it was yesterday.

    Huge weight difference, but I'm thinking I'd appreciate the space in the Terrono. Oh - and for the middle states (VA - VT) , I just have a double faced radiant barrier pad for the bottom - the bottom quilt will go, so I think I can use my ultra light pack. So, this is just for colder weather.
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  7. #7
    Registered User Raul Perez's Avatar
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    I'd say make the quilts out of M90 fabric to save more weight and see if they stuff well with a weeks worth of food and such in your current pack.

    Down will lose its loft if overly compressed for a long period of time. Meaning if it stays in a compressed state for weeks or months. Having it compressed for 10-12 hours and then opened up and used won't cause much of a difference. Worst case scenario is that you go into town, buy some tennis balls and toss your quilts in the dryer for an hour. BAM!

    Raul

  8. #8
    Hike smarter, not harder.
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    Raul beat me to it. I still wouldn't use a compression sack on a down bag, but quality down can be compressed daily.
    Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe - Thomas Sowell

  9. #9
    Registered User Catavarie's Avatar
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    Listen to the Water Monkey, he knows his stuff.

    Down is far more resilient than many give it credit for. It can and does take daily compression extremely well. Just look at all the thruhikers every year that use down sleepingbags. Even if you're resonably going to be hiking for 16 hours a day you still have your down uncompressed for 8 hours each night. Long term compression may cause a loss of loft. But I've heard of people leaving down compressed for years and it still lofting up just fine after a little TLC.

    tl;dr Down is tougher than most people give it credit for.

  10. #10

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    Sounds like a plan. . . . I decided that despite the great bag sales about now, I just have to get the rest of the gear made before I figure out a bag. Good to know about the down, that it can take daily compression so long as it's out of the bag nightly.
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

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