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  1. #1

    Default Light 1-man tent?

    Hey everyone,
    Im looking to buy a lightweight (under 27oz) 1-man tent today under the $300 range.

    I've looked at the light heart gear solo tents and and unsure about how the spreader poles set in.
    Checked out the Six Moons Designs Skyscaper Trekker

    I'm a 6' male of average weight. Any recommendations?

    -BFH11

  2. #2
    Registered User Tuckahoe's Avatar
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    I'd recommend the Lightheart solo tent. The ridge pole is simply held in place with velcro loops and your trekking poles or tent poles the fit into the open ends of that ridge pole. The pole support is on the inside of the tent.
    igne et ferrum est potentas
    "In the beginning, all America was Virginia." -​William Byrd

  3. #3
    Registered User Glogg's Avatar
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    The Tarptent Notch is 26 oz including stakes and stuff sack, pitches very fast with only 4 stakes needed along with a pair of trekking poles. Well within your budget, check it out at http://tarptent.com/notch.html. I have one and am very satisfied with it. Easy to pitch taut, can pitch either the net inner or the fly alone if so inclined, two doors and generously sized vestibules.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuckahoe64 View Post
    I'd recommend the Lightheart solo tent. The ridge pole is simply held in place with velcro loops and your trekking poles or tent poles the fit into the open ends of that ridge pole. The pole support is on the inside of the tent.
    I second this one https://whiteblaze.net/forum/show...Tent&highlight=

    Another one worth a good look is the Tarptent Moment. http://www.tarptent.com/moment.html
    A friend of mine has one and it's probably the best single walled solo tent design I've seen for those who don't use hiking poles. The footprint is a bit smaller than the Lightheart tent and it has a roomy vestibule (but not as much floor space).
    You can't beat the setup time of the Moment,
    On the other hand, Lightheart Gear is a true cottage industry (if you get a tent sewn by Judy, which will cost you a few more $$). Her standard tents are made in the far east somewhere. I'm not sure if Tarptent shelters are made in the USA, but they've become pretty mainstream, (not that there's anything wrong with that, really).
    With the Lightheart tents, you can completely roll up the fly to the ridgeline, making it just like sleeping in the open (without bugs).
    With the TT Moment you can slide the fly up the pole for better views, but some of the stars will be hidden.
    Neither has a removeable fly.

    Here is an excerpt from the original thread above regarding the Lightheart Tent:
    Update: Actual usage on the AT (NY).
    I used the tent for three nights the third week in Sept. There was only one brief sprinkle on the last night when I camped by the West Mountain Shelter. The pullouts proved to be invaluable in the increase in usable head and foot room. I got a reply from the busy owner of the company and she thought that the extra tabs were a good idea. We'll see if she implements them. If not, they're very easy to sew on and they don't take a ton of stress, anyhow.
    All three nights proved to be warmer than expected and I slept half out of my 50 degree (approx) one pound Montbell ultralight semi-rectangular bag. I used my Big Agnes Air core mummy pad and slept almost as well as in my hammock.
    Since I can't use my camera software with my computer you'll have to use your imaginations as to the placement of the pullouts.
    With the addition of the pullout tabs and ultralight spectra guylines the tent now weighs 1# 11-1/2 oz. (in the stuffsack). Not too shabby.
    With the addition of a pair of velcro strips at the ridgeline to secure the plastic ridge pole (it doesn't move unless you move your trekking poles, really), it would be a fantastic deal for a long distance ground dweller.

    Judy has implemented both the pullout and velcro spreader bar holders in her tents.
    Last edited by Tinker; 02-16-2012 at 16:06.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  5. #5
    Registered User mad4scrapping's Avatar
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    I also recommend the lightheart. great tent. easy to pitch and feels very roomy inside.
    Lead me to the long green tunnel.

  6. #6
    Registered User timmy_toes's Avatar
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    why not take a the zpack heximid solo i have one and love it! total of 7.3oz with stakes, guide lines and ground sheet I have used mine in 20 degree weather, windy, and rainy conditions and it withstood all of the elements! also there is a carbon pole option for another 1.5oz if you dont use trekking poles

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    Registered User rusty bumper's Avatar
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    I also recommend the Tarptent Moment. I used one on my hike last year and absolutely loved it. It weighs 30 oz. before seam-sealing and has a single hoop pole and 2 pegs. I could put it up in less than 2 minutes and it came down just as fast.

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    Some quick points on the TT models.
    At 6' you will comfortably fit inside any of them.
    The Moment is the fastest to put up but having its own pole is a bit heavier (about 30oz inc pegs, only needs 2 )
    The Notch at 26oz is lighter if you already use poles.
    Somewhat similar to the Moment but it has a fully detachable bug inner that can be set up by itself .
    Having two doors/vestibules you can choose which side you want to use and also leave one side partially or fully open under rain.
    BTW, all of the TT are made in Seattle.(Henry only makes the prototypes)
    Franco
    franco@tarptent.com

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    Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo at 23 oz. They go one sale in Feb., I got mine last year for $185. I used it almost every night for my thru-hke last year.
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  10. #10
    Registered User Drybones's Avatar
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    I have the Tarptent Notch at 26 oz and am well pleased. After I seam sealed it and put silicon strips on the floor and got 8" stakes the weight is now 29 oz...which I'm okay with. Goes up fast and comes down fast. I recommend getting the 8" stakes as you only have 4 stakes holding the tent down. I had two days of hard rain to soften the ground and high winds and had a stake come loose...converted to 8" stakes. I was concerned with it being too tight but at 6'2" it has worked well...plenty of room. Go to their web site and watch the set up videos.

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    Registered User q-tip's Avatar
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    TT Contrail

  12. #12

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    The Lightheart Solo has a Hydrostatic Head of 3500, and is a double walled tent. The others only have a 1200-2000 Hydrostatic Head.
    Singletrack

  13. #13
    Wanna-be hiker trash Sarcasm the elf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singletrack View Post
    The Lightheart Solo has a Hydrostatic Head of 3500, and is a double walled tent. The others only have a 1200-2000 Hydrostatic Head.

    What does that mean in real world conditions?
    "This sucks and I love it."

  14. #14
    Registered User HeartFire's Avatar
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    The hydrostatic head is the amount of pressure it takes to force water through the fabric. so the 'standard' LightHeart tents are about 3 times more waterproof than the others. These tents were manufactured in China the fabric is from Korea. There will be no 'misting' or water seepage through the fabric.

    Condensation on the other hand has to do with many factors - weather conditions, dew point, location of where you set up, ventilation of the tent etc.
    The LightHeart Solo will just fit a 6' 0" person, for a really roomy tent at essentially the same weight a SoLong 6 will provide much more room. The SoLong 6's are made in North Carolina only (by me) and are made with the 1200 mm HH fabric (all that is available in the US). The SoLong 6 is a 'hybrid' part double, part single wall, with 2 ridge vents on the single wall area. 8 inch bathtub floor, you don't quite get the same star gazing as in the Solo, but it opens up pretty well, Numerous options for color, fly configuration etc.

    Thanks

    Judy - LightHeart Gear

  15. #15

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    From Franco:

    (BTW, all of the TT are made in Seattle.(Henry only makes the prototypes)

    Thanks for the info, Franco. Any idea who makes the tents in Seattle? (Just wondering if it's a subsidiary of REI).
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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    "Just wondering if it's a subsidiary of REI"
    No, nothing to do with REI that I know of.
    Franco

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    Registered User Loneoak's Avatar
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    Lightheart..... love mine

  18. #18
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    TT Moment, great tent

  19. #19
    Garlic
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    Ditto the Contrail from Tarptent. The design might be archaic by now with the one front door, but it's completely reliable. It will pitch with only one trekking pole if you break one, and does not have any hoop poles to break or lose, both of which I've done with other tents. I do admit, the newer designs sure look tempting for their features, but I'm voting for simplicity and reliability, not to mention cost.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  20. #20
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    Garlic
    You will be pleased to know that having a full range of TT solo tents on my last trip I used again the Contrail.
    The reason was that we had to pay $23 per pad (about 10'x10' each) and the Contrail was the only one that I could fit in with the Strato Spire 2 used by my two mates.
    As it turned out we were the only ones camping at each spot for the 5 nights so ended up using two pads anyway but still happy with the size and weight of the Contrail
    (I am looking forward to use the Notch though...)
    GOW-SS2--Contrail.jpgGOW-SS-CON-2.jpg
    Franco

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