Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: Thru-Hike FOOD

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2012
    Location
    Portland, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    3

    Default Thru-Hike FOOD

    I'll be starting a thru hike with 2 of my friends in early March. We have most of our gear ready, but the one area of preparation that we are most uncertain about is food. I'd like to get a general idea of the daily food intake/menu of other thru hikers, and how much food one may pack at any given time.

  2. #2
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-13-2010
    Location
    Kingsville, Texas
    Age
    70
    Posts
    2,224

    Default

    You are planning to leave in a couple of weeks or so and you haven't thought about food?

    I eat quick cooking oats, raisins, lotsa sugar and coffee, lotsa sugar for breakfast.

    Several lunches during the day peanutbutter on flour tortilla

    Several snacks, usually either peanuts or Snicker

    Dinner, from stuff like instant mashed potatoes, Knorr rice sides, Spam singles, Tyson chicken in pouch, Ramen, mac & cheese.

    I try to carry around three days to start but you may have to carry five or six on a couple of stretches, figure 2lbs/day.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2012
    Location
    Portland, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Lots of thought, purchasing no. Thanks for your advice. PB is atop our list, right alongside oats, couscous, Ramen, and pre-made dehydrated snack foods to be shipped by our support group along the way.

  4. #4
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-13-2010
    Location
    Kingsville, Texas
    Age
    70
    Posts
    2,224

    Default

    Check out the Knorr sides, cheap, easy to cook and high in calories. My favorite is red beans and rice. Mac & Cheese is the best calorie bang for the buck. Instant mashed potatoes are a hiker staple. Poptarts are popular

  5. #5
    Wanna-be hiker trash Sarcasm the elf's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    36
    Posts
    6,429
    Images
    78

    Default

    This may sound odd, but Mac and cheese inside a tortilla is one of my favorite trail foods. Almost anything on flatbread is good, even peanut utter and trail mix wrapped up.

    Eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables when in town and consider packing some out to eat the first day or two out of town. Lots of backpacking food is crap, so you need to get good stuff in when you can.

    Also, many people lose their appetite the first week or two hiking. This is normal, but make sure to keep track of your intake, you might need to convince yourself to eat from time to time. Eventually your appetite will come back with a vengeance.
    "This sucks and I love it."

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-28-2004
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Age
    55
    Posts
    11,112

    Default

    Classic article from Ryan Jordan and other's 2006 Arctic 1000 trek.
    http://backpackinglight.typepad.com/...d_and_coo.html

    Details from above article:
    Starting body weight = 155 pounds
    Ending body weight = 134 pounds (predicted)
    Calories from body = 36,000 calories (predicted)
    Calories from food = 94,000 calories (predicted)
    Total Calories = 130,000 calories
    Total Distance = 600 miles
    Cummulative Elevation Gain = 10 miles
    Duration = 24 miles

    Assumptions:
    Skin Out Weight = 15 pounds
    Average Total Weight on Feet = 160 pounds
    Total Effective Miles = 600 miles + 10 miles x 10 = 700 Flat Miles
    Base Calories per day = 145 pounds x 10 = 1450 calories / day
    Total Base Calories = 1450 x 24 = 34800 calories
    Hiking Calories = 130,000 - 34,800 = 95,200 calories
    Hiking Calories per mile = 95,200 / 600 = 159 calories per mile
    = roughly 1 calorie per Pound of Average Total Weight per Flat Mile

    So a rough estimate of total calories burned hiking hiking a trail:
    Base Calories = Average Body Weight in Pounds x 10 = Base Calories per Day
    Hiking Calories = Average Total Weight in Pounds x Flat Miles per Day = Hiking Calories per Day
    Flat Miles = Actual Miles + Cummulative Gain in Miles x 10
    Total Calories = Base Calories + Hiking Calories
    ( You will need more calories if you do extra activities beyond hiking and basic camping, i.e. town calories )

    Appalachian Trail Calories:

    Example 1:
    180 pound average body weight, 30 pounds average skin out weight, 150 days
    2184 miles + 98 miles cummulative elevation gain
    Base Calories = 180 pounds x 10 x 150 days = 270,000 calories
    Hiking Calories = 210 pounds x ( 2184 miles + 98 miles x 10 ) = 210 x 3164 = 664,440
    Total Calories per Day = ( 270,000 + 664,440 ) / 150 = 6230 calories per day ( 14.6 miles per day )

    Example 2:
    140 pound average body weight, 20 pounds average skin out weight, 100 days
    2184 miles + 98 miles cummulative elevation gain
    Base Calories = 140 pounds x 10 x 100 days = 140,000 calories
    Hiking Calories = 160 pounds x ( 2184 miles + 98 miles x 10 ) = 160 x 3164 = 506,240
    Total Calories per Day = ( 140,000 + 506,240 ) / 100 = 6462 calories per day ( 21.9 miles per day )

    Don't hold me to it.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-23-2009
    Location
    Coral Springs, FL
    Age
    42
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    Also, many people lose their appetite the first week or two hiking. This is normal, but make sure to keep track of your intake, you might need to convince yourself to eat from time to time. Eventually your appetite will come back with a vengeance.

    I've heard that. Why is that the case?

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-28-2004
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Age
    55
    Posts
    11,112

    Default

    I think I made a mistake somewhere. The calories per pound per flat miles should be somewhat lower, like 0.8 or so.
    Needs more work. Have at it.

  9. #9
    MEGA '11, LT '09,'13
    Join Date
    06-03-2009
    Location
    SLC, UT
    Age
    29
    Posts
    231
    Images
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    This may sound odd, but Mac and cheese inside a tortilla is one of my favorite trail foods. Almost anything on flatbread is good, even peanut utter and trail mix wrapped up.

    Eat a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables when in town and consider packing some out to eat the first day or two out of town. Lots of backpacking food is crap, so you need to get good stuff in when you can.
    s
    My staple all along the LT was Mac N Cheese is tortillas with a tuna package, maybe some duck or mustard sauces from chinese take out, and a freshly cut up red onion. Cant go wrong mac N Cheese and (most) anything!

    I didnt carry a stove or pot for the first 1500 miles SOBO last year - my staples were instance mashed potatoes, ramen, avocados, hard cheese, fig newtons, honey buns, cookies, big bags of Malt-o-meal cereals (sold in the bag alone), mini carrots, individual ketchup and mustard packets (i would eat these by themselves sometimes) and tuna. When I picked my stove up for the last quarter of the trip, I started cooking "odd" stuff most reguarly, namely Quinoa (cooks best over open fires with sustained heat for simmer i found) CousCous, and egg noodles just for a warm meal.

    Truthfully though, I ate everything all the time. Didnt really matter what it was. My favorite was Boy Scout stew

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MJW155 View Post
    I've heard that. Why is that the case?

    I think hikers start burning their body fat more effectively those first few weeks.

  11. #11

    Default

    Ramen has more salt than all the oceans of the world in one serving. They forgot to leave room for the taste.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  12. #12
    AT 4000+, LT, FHT, ALT Blissful's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-14-2005
    Location
    Virginia, 10 miles from the AT near SNP
    Age
    54
    Posts
    10,470
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    171

    Default

    I blog about food ideas for a long distance hike.







    Hiking Blog
    AT NOBO and SOBO, LT, FHT, ALT
    Shenandoah NP Ridgerunner, Author, Speaker


  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-20-2012
    Location
    Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States
    Age
    25
    Posts
    30

    Default

    The more you hike the more creative you get with food. Don't limit yourself the whole idea of eating 'hiker food' half way made my stomach turn sour.

    Pancakes - these are fun add M&Ms - but you'll need a spatula and a frying pan. There was a hiker that introduced Pancakes to me on the trail. After I had them I just had to make my own.

    Hummus - You can use carrots it dip in. Some people dehydrate since it's pretty heavy. Uhh it tastes so good.

    Somersausage and barbecue sauce - Caution do not eat a lot of pepperoni. Unless you want heartburn and other unwanted feelings.

    Hot dogs - I made money selling dogs - a word of caution don't eat then after more than three days.

    Bacon - I started getting things partly because I wanted to make people jealous, since people are always talking about food, and Bacon smells so good.

  14. #14
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-13-2010
    Location
    Kingsville, Texas
    Age
    70
    Posts
    2,224

    Default

    Lotsa foods you can get for the first day or two after a town stop, cheese, hard sausages, fried chicken, fruit and veggies. Onions will last a long time.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-01-2012
    Location
    Lower Catskill Mountains
    Posts
    134

    Default

    Hi...


    I eat Ramen with only half the water and half the flavor packet.

    How come I've never heard anyone mention pemmican? I make mine with shredded beef jerkey, diced bacon and raisens. It's a fun food to experiment with...adding other or more items to it. I also usually carry a few tins of sardines or herring in mustard or tomato sauce. And some MRE crackers. Plus a baggie full of Jif smooth peannut butter, which has a high sugar content.

    Does anyone else use these items?

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-28-2004
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Age
    55
    Posts
    11,112

    Default

    I like the peanut butter that uses non-hydrogenated fat, or good old raisins and peanuts.

    I know for a fact that peanut butter goes awesome with bacon. I would like to try peanut butter with bacon and oats some morning. Maybe pour in a little oil from the non-hydrogenated peanut butter, then fry up the diced bacon in my pot, then dump in some oats to brown them up a bit, and then finally drop in some spoonfuls of peanut butter to goop it all up. Not exactly sure how it would all come together but I'll bet you could hike some serious miles if you could choke it all down, chasing it with cowboy coffee.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2009
    Location
    Spring Lake, MI
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,260

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    I know for a fact that peanut butter goes awesome with bacon. I would like to try peanut butter with bacon and oats some morning. Maybe pour in a little oil from the non-hydrogenated peanut butter, then fry up the diced bacon in my pot, then dump in some oats to brown them up a bit, and then finally drop in some spoonfuls of peanut butter to goop it all up. Not exactly sure how it would all come together but I'll bet you could hike some serious miles if you could choke it all down, chasing it with cowboy coffee.
    That actually sounds very good!

  18. #18

    Default

    Lol ugh! Give me chocolate or give me death

  19. #19
    Ohhh-Rraahhh!! Derek81pci's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-03-2011
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Age
    36
    Posts
    133

    Default

    I've read a lot that "empty calories" can actually be beneficial for LDHiking. Honey buns have an absurd amount of calories, Clif bars have the most calories (choco/coconut) and 1 other kind I cant recall at the moment have 220 calories per bar, Powerbar "Protien" like have 330 calories per, but Clif bars are almost a dollar cheaper, and weigh a bit more. That's good for snacking. In town... find a Chili's or TGIFridays... great for hikers but probably the reason for America's obesity issues. Just the blooming onion alone has almost 3,000 calories, the chicken fajitas are 2,8000. I've found that OceanSpran dried cranberry things are delicious, and the tiny little individual packs are 100 calories. I'm sure I could eat a whole bag of them, 600 calories for $1.59.
    Live your life and I'll live mine, perhaps one day they will intertwine. SEMPER FI! 2013 SOBO

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-08-2008
    Location
    Damascus! (Detroit originally)
    Posts
    738
    Images
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
    You are planning to leave in a couple of weeks or so and you haven't thought about food?
    HA! i left amicalola with 5 lbs. of quinoa and 2.5 lbs of not instant oatmeal...i had no idea what i was doing...
    Check out my website: www.serialhiking.com

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •