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  1. #1
    GA-ME 78, sectional 81-01 HIKER7s's Avatar
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    Default The BOOT Question

    Hey all,

    Wanted to just get a sampling of who is using what on their feet these days.


    I guess you can keep it to the warm weather months. Interested in developing a profile of sorts to be able to give some sound advice in regards to the "BOOT" issue.

    I have been using the Vasque Zephyr's this year and I am about ready to bail on them after 150miles.

    This post is not specifically for me I have some hikers who want the best info (the best info IMO is from the community)

    The thought here also is, if I direct them to a link, they'll stay here too.

    Brian
    I hiked that ridge Pop told me not to that morning.
    Each time out, I see that same ridge- only different.
    Each one is an adventure in itself. Leading to what is beyond the next- HIKER7s


  2. #2
    Registered User Maren's Avatar
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    No boots! Brooks Cascadia 7.

  3. #3
    GA-ME 78, sectional 81-01 HIKER7s's Avatar
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    Thanks Maren, this is what I am looking for; the issue of the BOOT vs Trail-runner or low cuff to emerge.
    I hiked that ridge Pop told me not to that morning.
    Each time out, I see that same ridge- only different.
    Each one is an adventure in itself. Leading to what is beyond the next- HIKER7s


  4. #4
    Ickybod jburgasser's Avatar
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    I still use a pair of Merrills boot from 2002. I'll probably switch to shoes when (if!) these wear out.

    JB
    I gotta get my head out of the clouds, but that is where my heart is.

  5. #5
    lemon b's Avatar
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    Merrill Refuge Core Mids. My sneaker days are over because of age. Specfically the toenails.

  6. #6

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    I just got a pair of Vasque trail runners. They look like they might last a month. I hope to be surprised. When they fall apart I'll replace them with an even more poorly constructed pair of Nike cross trainers.
    Then I'll be out of shoes, but I will have hopefully found a pair someone else was wearing that were awesome and I'll order those through the magical wed of information and transportation networks we have created.
    My feet hurt most of the time, so I expect them to continue to hurt.

  7. #7
    Registered User
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    The most important criterion is that the boots/shoes fit well. The whole boots vs. trail runners thing has been beaten to death.

  8. #8
    Working on Forestry Grad schol
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    Default

    there's three groups of people:
    1. Older folks that use boots for a variety of reasons (habit and or health, I'm not sure )
    2. Folks that hike frequently and use some sort of runner/trail runner
    3. folks that don't hike much and advocate boots.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ScottP View Post
    there's three groups of people:
    1. Older folks that use boots for a variety of reasons (habit and or health, I'm not sure )
    2. Folks that hike frequently and use some sort of runner/trail runner
    3. folks that don't hike much and advocate boots.
    Add '4' to your list:
    4. Older folks that have switched from boots to trail runners after they saw the benefit of lighter footwear (as well as lighter packs)....but it's still a HYOH. What works for one, does not always work for all. Us? Trail runners all the time now for us. I'm sure you've heard the 'a pound on the foot is like 5 pounds on your back'. IMHO, I think there really is some truth to that.

  10. #10
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by royalusa View Post
    Add '4' to your list:
    4. Older folks that have switched from boots to trail runners after they saw the benefit of lighter footwear (as well as lighter packs)....but it's still a HYOH.
    For any trail I have on my list it is trail runners and I am 53. I got boots and mids collecting dust in the gear room. Those Keens mids in my avatar pic have a lot of miles left in em. I just don't see wearing them again.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  11. #11
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    I've hiked in both and still use boots. My boots are lighter than they used to be but I still wish I could buy another pair of Vasque Sundowners made like my old pair. Weight isn't everything. The bottom line is this.... I hike typically between 12-15 miles/day. Whatever makes that most pleasant in the conidtions I'm hiking in are what goes on my feet. The other upside to the Sundowners was lifespan. I could put 2K miles on a pair whereas with the light weight boots/shoes you blow through them like they are disposable. In the long run the heavier boot was a better value.

  12. #12
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevperro View Post
    I've hiked in both and still use boots. My boots are lighter than they used to be but I still wish I could buy another pair of Vasque Sundowners made like my old pair.
    I got some original Italian Sundowners collecting dust too.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  13. #13

    Default

    #5 old people who've become frugal over the years prefer boots.

    $200 Boots will last for multiple seasons of heavy hiking and $100 trail runners won't (because they're not meant to). I use trail runners for day hikes and mid summer 1-3 nighters, but I do kill a pair a season. I wear boots in fall, winter, spring and for extended hikes....the same ones I've had for 6 years.

    Like the post above stated.....it's a matter of lifespan.

  14. #14
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCountryWoods View Post
    .....it's a matter of lifespan.
    For me, the various "lifespans" of different footwear means almost nothing. Comfort is #1.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  15. #15

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    Boots rule,trial runners drool

  16. #16
    Registered User Old Boots's Avatar
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    I just got off the trail after 200 miles using Oboz Windrivers. No blisters or even hotspots the entire 4weeks.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChinMusic View Post
    For me, the various "lifespans" of different footwear means almost nothing. Comfort is #1.
    Don't remember stating it wasn't......

    .....but lets infer comfort was close to equal. For myself and many of my frugal trail squirrels.....quality of materials and longevity play a big role in the choice.

    It's your money, spend it how you wish.

  18. #18
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    I use boots for trailwork and once in a great while during 'mud season'. That's about it for anything remotely hiking related.

    (Skiing is another ball o' wax. )
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  19. #19
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCountryWoods View Post
    Don't remember stating it wasn't......
    And I remember stating "for me". In fact, I opened with it.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  20. #20
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthCountryWoods View Post
    #5 old people who've become frugal over the years prefer boots.

    $200 Boots will last for multiple seasons of heavy hiking and $100 trail runners won't (because they're not meant to). I use trail runners for day hikes and mid summer 1-3 nighters, but I do kill a pair a season. I wear boots in fall, winter, spring and for extended hikes....the same ones I've had for 6 years.

    Like the post above stated.....it's a matter of lifespan.
    The solution to this dilemma is don't buy $100 trail runners. Sierra Trading Post right now has probably 20 pairs of trail runners under $50 bucks. Sign up, get a 35% off and $2.50 shipping coupon and take your pick of $30-$35 trail running shoes then you can buy 5-7 pairs of trail runners per one pair of boots.

    I just bought these Columbia shoes for I think $27. http://www.sierratradingpost.com/col...colorFamily=01

    Before that I found some at Endless.com (free shipping to and back if you don't like, same as Zappos.com) The North Face that I really like I think I paid less than $40 for them.

    The bonus to me is these are normal looking shoes so you can wear them out and about, on vacation then seamlessly transition to a day hike...all blister free.

    My question to the boot users...be honest...are you constantly managing blisters? Almost everyone I know that uses boots are always dealing with blisters (and hot sweaty feet). Since I switched to trail runners, I haven't even had a hot spot much less a blister. I didn't know that it could be that way until I switched. No need for camp shoes, hardly any need to take your shoes off at lunch breaks to cool and dry your socks (still do but dont have to). Its just so much more...like normal. Your footwear just becomes something on your feet not something that needs to be managed.

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