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  1. #1

    Default Keeping Warm at The Beginning of the hike

    If i have on Thermal longjohn's, shorts, lightweight pants, long sleeve shirt, insulated jacket, and I am sleeping in a hammock with a 20 degree sleeping bag, a rain tarp, bug net and insulated air core pad am I going to be cold in Georgia in March-April ?

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    Garlic
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    If you get a chance, try a mid-teens night on a weekend car camping trip before you start your thru hike. I had several nights in the teens, with blowing snow, in the high country in the South in April. Nobody can really answer how you will do, not knowing your physical condition, your basal metabolism, what you've eaten, and if you'll be exhausted, dehydrated, or wet when you go to bed. Good luck dialing in your set-up.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darwin S and A View Post
    If i have on Thermal long johns, shorts, lightweight pants, long sleeve shirt, insulated jacket, and I am sleeping in a hammock with a 20 degree sleeping bag, a rain tarp, bug net and insulated air core pad am I going to be cold in Georgia in March-April ?
    Go take a walk done by the river...right now,pretty cold out there.....but it will give you a good idea of probably the coldest you'll endure,just don't get mugged,bring your hiking poles or eh hem.....whatever you got!The wind died down here in NJ but it is still 31 degrees where I am.

  4. #4
    Registered User Edwardo Rodriguez's Avatar
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    Well last year on the John Muir Trail, in the mornings what I wear is a fleece pants and a fleece hoodie and a beanie (apart from what i have on underneath). If I need to I can wear my down jacket until i get warm up. Next year am planing on taken the same combo on the AT.

  5. #5
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Question: why use an air-core pad with a hammock? A closed cell foam pad is much warmer. The hammock provides the comfort. And the CCF pad can be used at every break and lunch stop - very useful. The air-core pad, not so much.

    Make sure whatever bottom insulation you bring (like your pad) wraps around your shoulders, and extends to your feet. The 20-F bag should be enough, especially as you'll get a little more loft using it as a quilt, but the insulation beneath you is *critical*.

    While we can still have something of a cold snap (it was 36-F here overnight), I don't expect the really frigid temps this April that we've had on occasion in the past. Be prepared for below-freezing temps and you should be fine.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    Question: why use an air-core pad with a hammock? A closed cell foam pad is much warmer. The hammock provides the comfort. And the CCF pad can be used at every break and lunch stop - very useful. The air-core pad, not so much.

    Make sure whatever bottom insulation you bring (like your pad) wraps around your shoulders, and extends to your feet. The 20-F bag should be enough, especially as you'll get a little more loft using it as a quilt, but the insulation beneath you is *critical*.

    While we can still have something of a cold snap (it was 36-F here overnight), I don't expect the really frigid temps this April that we've had on occasion in the past. Be prepared for below-freezing temps and you should be fine.


    I have the air core pad thats the only reason why I would use it. As for padding when you sit and stuff that's not something I'm worrying about. For my spring break a few weeks ago I hiked part of the NY section. Some of the mornings were absolutely freezing but only when I got out of my sleeping bag. I slept outside for some of those days and found that when I woke up and got out I was cold but would warm up with my extra clothes or when i started hiking. I took my sleeping bag, pad and gloves, hat warm clothes.

  7. #7
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    Perhaps, but it really depends on you. Are you a cold or warm sleeper, etc.....

    One thing most people don't realize, especially when first starting out, is how important it is to pump calories into your body before bedtime. Seems like so many new hikers are so worn out at the end of the day they skip or minimize the evening meal then lay shoving in their sleeping bag wondering why. I saw way too many section hikers fall prey to this on my thru hike.

    You gotta fuel our body!
    Last edited by Spokes; 03-27-2012 at 12:23.

  8. #8

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    I am a college athlete and take nutrition very seriously. I run hot and was breaking into a sweat sleeping outside in my sleeping bag this March. I am a big dude and NEED to eat or I will fail. I will make sure to eat enough though.

  9. #9

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    If the temps stay the same as they have been for the last few weeks, you should be ok.

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    Yes. Looking getting an overquilt for your hammock. Check out:

    http://www.jacksrbetter.com/ AND

    I can't access YouTube at work. Search for Shugemery and check out his videos. He hikes in a hammock in sub zero temps in Minnesota.
    Pain is a by-product of a good time.

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