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  1. #21
    Registered User Drybones's Avatar
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    10-13-2010
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    You'll get as many opinions as there are tent owners, what works for one may not work for another, I went thru 4 tents before I discovered what works for me...good luck.

  2. #22
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    12-04-2009
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    Black Diamond Betalite

  3. #23
    Registered User Frog's Avatar
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    12-24-2003
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    Danbury N C
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    what works for one may not work for another. I have had too many tents to name since 1972 and found the Hillebergs to out last and be the best by far. They do have some new ones that are lighter. There design for putting the whole tent up at once and keeping the rain out of the sleeping area out does all the tents i have used. I use a RAJD during warmer months only two pounds and sets up in minutes. Yes it is a tarp type tent. For all around cooler months i use a nallo 2 which my brother owns. They pack up small. They do make a three season tent that is just a little over four pounds and is the 3 season version of the nallo. These tents for me anyway are the best bang for the buck that i have ever bought. I used a North Face V E 24 for winter in the 70s but it weighted in at 10 pounds and at the time it was the most bomb proof tent you could buy. Until you have spent a night or two in any tent you want know if it is what you really want in a tent.

  4. #24

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    I have a sierra designs mojo that I love. 2 man tent under 3 lbs. fly and netting are integrated. This helps keep it light, and is also great for keeping inside dry during rain pitches. Plenty of vestibule space under front door and 2 side vestibules certainly enough for two people. The stuff sack was a bit large for me on account that the length was double what was needed to encompass the stake and pole bag. I just use the stake and pole bag, which is neatly integrated, and stuff the fabric part of tent in a sea to summit xs stuff sack. Makes it extremely compact. Was a bit worried about the netting and faintly being integrated due to condensation but works really well. If its hot I just flip up the sides to expose the netting. Also like that I can still stargaze by leaving front vestibule open, due to the angle of the door.

  5. #25
    Registered User Chubbs4U's Avatar
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    01-11-2011
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    PA 20 min outside of Philadelphia
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    Watching this to see where it goes and I love the pictures...

  6. #26
    Registered User
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    01-23-2006
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    Melbourne,Australia
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    Ever noticed how two people of the same size have a totally different view of the same tent ?"I am 6'2" and fit really nicely inside the...."
    "anyone that is 6'2" or more will hate..(same tent) "
    Why is that ?
    Can simply be that one has longer legs then torso so he can sit up inside that shelter whilst the other has the head pressing against the roof.
    Or simply one does not care (or maybe even notice) that his head is rubbing against the roof...
    Another reason can be that one sleeps curled up , the other stretches out.


    This morning I read a negative comment (re :condensation) about a tent I like.
    Very likely we both experience exactly the same problem but see it from a different point of view.
    Specifically I always have a kitchen cloth with me inside the shelter.
    Before I go to sleep and when I wake up during the night (typically two or three times) if needed I wipe the top dry.
    The other person complains the it rains inside.
    It probably would "rain" inside mine too but as stated I just wipe, to me that is not a problem to others it is...
    Anyway as you might have seen that the OP's request is for a sub 4lbs tent , most here seem to recommend a 5 to 10 lbs version...

  7. #27

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    Hope it's not too late to offer my experiences to the pile. I tried the lightheart solo. Great design, light weight but.. I'm 6'6" also and couldn't sleep in it without my feet hitting the wall. In a single wall tent this means leaking onto my Western Engineering down bag. They were great about taking it back so you could try it and see. I then bought a Big Agnes UL3. It's a bit over 3lbs but super roomy and I love it. You can cut a few ounces here and there with less stakes etc. It's got plenty of room and is well made. Good luck

  8. #28

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    Hilleberg tents are bombproof and impeccably sewn. That said, I don't believe that they would make a very good tent for hot/humid conditions. They simply don't have many ventilation options. The mesh inner tent option might help, but it will add many $$ to the initial cost of the tent. The hooded vents near the peak of the tent are some of the best, but there is a lack of mesh or fabric backed mesh on most of the models that they offer.

    I've owned an Akto since 2005. Excellent solo winter tent. The floor is much tougher than on any tent I've seen in the past 10 years (heavier, too).
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

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